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Jacobite Receipt to Paisley Town Magistrates (1745 Rebellion)

Jacobite Receipt to Paisley Town Magistrates (1745 Rebellion)On 29 December 1745, exactly 275 years ago to the day, the Jacobites led by Bonnie Prince Charlie issued a summons to the then Paisley Town Council to meet and account for raising a local militia against them.

This summons, along with a receipt from the Prince’s Secretary for a £500 fine paid just five days later by the people of Paisley, will go on display when Paisley Museum reopens following its £42m redevelopment.

Jacobite Propaganda Medal commissioned by Charles Edward Stuart

Unlike other towns, that were also fined by the Jacobites but later reimbursed, Paisley’s money has never been returned. Glasgow received £10,000 for its loss in 1749, and in 1750 Dumfries was indemnified with £2,800, however every application Paisley made was refused.

Archie Henderson, Social History Research Assistant for Paisley Museum said: “The history of the Jacobites is full of fascinating tales and having the opportunity to reinterpret the museum’s collection, tell new stories and retell old stories in a more engaging way is all part of the museum’s redevelopment. On 30th December this year Bonnie Prince Charlie will celebrate his 300th birthday, so what better time for us to remind people of this part of our town’s history.” 

Originally, Bonnie Prince Charlie fined Paisley £1,000 and took Bailie Matthew Kyle and former Bailie William Park hostage to ensure the fine was paid. However, this fine was later reduced to £500 providing it was paid in full by the following evening. When the time came, the town only managed to pay £300, and the payment window was extended by 12 hours. At the final hour the remaining payment was made to the Jacobites and a receipt from the Prince’s Secretary John Murray of Broughton was issued.

Henderson goes on to explain: “After the Jacobites were defeated at Culloden, and money started to be repaid to other towns, Paisley Council was advised that they should take John Murray to court, which they did in 1753 and the case dragged on for seven years without success. In 1760 an appeal was launched but again there is no record of any response or positive outcome, so the debt has remained outstanding.”

It is believed that £500 in today’s money would be worth more than £100,000.

The redevelopment of the museum will enable the number of objects on display to be increased by 100%. Significant items from the Jacobite collection that will go on display alongside the summons (dated 29 Dec 1745) and the receipt (dated 3 Jan 1746) include a Culloden sword passed down from the Carlile family; a Jacobite silver medal commissioned by Bonnie Prince Charlie; a painting by David Wilkie (1819) of The Veteran Highlander; and a headstone originally from the grounds of Paisley Abbey commemorating John Orr, one of eight Paisley volunteers killed at the Battle of Falkirk in 1746.

Paisley Museum is part of the town’s radical regeneration plan, and the redesign of the campus is led by an international team including architects AL_A and exhibition designers Opera Amsterdam. When it reopens it is expected to attract over 125,000 visits each year and provide a £79 million economic boost to the area over the next 30 years.

Councillor Lisa-Marie Hughes, Chair of Renfrewshire Leisure, said: “Paisley’s collections are culturally significant and the museum’s refurbishment is a wonderful opportunity for the town to reinterpret our objects for public display in a way that is engaging and meaningful to visitors.

“It is also a real tribute to our curatorial teams past and present, that our objects are still in such good condition, and are able to illustrate the area’s rich culture and the people’s story.”

Paisley Museum Reimagined is supported by Renfrewshire Council, the National Lottery Heritage Fund and the Scottish Government’s Regeneration Capital Grant Fund. The museum’s final phase of fundraising is now under way, with the museum website reimagined.paisleymuseum.org showcasing the project’s ambitious vision.

new-baby

New parents could get up to £600 Pregnancy and Baby Payment

July and August are the months most of Scotland’s babies are born according to figures from National Records of Scotland.

new-baby

Almost 4,500 births were registered in July 2019 while 4,357 were registered in August. This is in comparison to an average of 4,062 across the remaining ten months.

Social Security Scotland is encouraging families who have recently welcomed a new baby into the family to find out if they are eligible for up to £600 to help with the costs of a newborn.

The Pregnancy and Baby Payment is open to parents or carers on certain benefits from the 24th week of pregnancy up to the day a baby is 6 months old.

It is not only for a first child – people who already have a child, and are expecting again or have had a baby in the past six months, could be entitled to £300.

Social Security Secretary Shirley-Anne Somerville said:

 

“If this year mirrors previous trends, many families will have recently welcomed a newborn into their lives. This will be a very exciting time for parents – but it can also be expensive. 

 

“The Pregnancy and Baby Payment can help ease some of the financial pressure – especially at a time when many people have been hit hard economically by Covid-19. 

 

“There is no cap on the number of children who can receive it – every eligible child in a qualifying family will get a payment. And if you were unable to apply on time due to Covid-19, Social Security Scotland may accept a late application. 

 

“Social Security Scotland also offers a pre-paid Best Start Foods card for eligible families that can be used to buy healthy foods for children under 3.

 

“I’d encourage anyone who thinks they might be eligible for these payments to find out more and apply today.”

 

Chief Executive of Early Years Scotland, Jane Brumpton said: 

 

“Early Years Scotland’s pledge that every child in Scotland deserves the best start in life has not waivered during these challenging times – we continue to support children and families in many innovative ways during the pandemic.

 

“Our team regularly signpost families that we support to this one-off payment, and many have benefited greatly to date.

 

“Many parents have expressed how helpful it’s been to alleviate some of the financial stresses and expenses that can occur during pregnancy and beyond.

 

“All eligible families should be supported at this critical time, to support investment in the very earliest years of a child’s life, leading to more positive outcomes for children overall.”

Background 

·       the payment is part of the Best Start Grant, a package of three payments delivered by Social Security Scotland to support families in receipt of certain benefits or tax credits

·       qualifying benefits include: Universal Credit, Income support, Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance, Income-related Employment and Support Allowance, Pension Credit, Housing Benefit, Child Tax Credit and Working Tax Credit

·       people can apply for the Pregnancy and Baby Payment whether they are in work or not.

·       people under 18 are automatically eligible and don’t have to be on a qualifying benefit.

·       people can find out more and apply at mygov.scot/beststart or by calling Social Security Scotland on 0800 182 2222

·       National Records of Scotland figures show that July and August were the most popular months for people having babies from 2015-2019.

·       National Records of Scotland birth rates publications can be found here: https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/general-publications/births-deaths-and-other-vital-events-quarterly-figures

·       In comparison, birth data from England and Wales reveals the highest number of births occur at the end of September: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/livebirths/articles/howpopularisyourbirthday/2015-12-18