Proposed front elevation

An innovative housing project in Renfrewshire will help to tackle climate change and could slash tenant’s annual heating bills to £150.

Proposed front elevation

Renfrewshire Council’s housing investment team has been given the green light to deliver a £4.5million retrofit of 75 terraced council houses.

The popular 1960s-built Paisley crosswall construction properties are being given a retrofit to reduce their carbon emissions and improve their energy efficiency.

Together with experts John Gilbert Architects, the Council team has developed a specialist, cost-effective package of works to radically reduce the amount of fuel being burned.

The completed works could enable carbon dioxide emissions to drop by almost 100 tonnes per property over the next 25 years, collectively preventing 7400 tonnes of Carbon Dioxide entering the environment.

And each property’s energy efficiency could rise from Band D to Band B, the second highest Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) rating, bringing the 60-year-old houses in line with most newbuild properties.

Councillor Marie McGurk, Convener of Renfrewshire Council’s Communities, Housing and Planning Board, said: “These houses are very popular with tenants as they have a front and back door, but unfortunately they weren’t built to meet modern energy efficiency standards.

“We’re very excited about this project which will improve the warmth and comfort levels for our tenants and ensure better ventilation all without the need for them to decant from their home, while at the same time tackling fuel poverty and making a critical contribution towards Renfrewshire being carbon neutral by 2030.

“Everyone should have homes to be proud of and this project will not only greatly improve the quality of Renfrewshire’s housing stock, but has the potential to be scaled up and adapted to fit other types of houses, becoming the blueprint to meet the highest energy efficiency standards.”

Renfrewshire councillors have approved the project plans and consultation will now get underway with tenants before work is scheduled to start this summer, taking around 18-months to complete.

An Energy Performance Survey will benchmark each home’s efficiency before the works start. New external wall insulation, roofing, solar panels, windows, external doors and underfloor insulation are all included, with off-site construction enabling the process at each home to be streamlined to take around 4-6 weeks.

The completed works will achieve the EnerPHit standard, one of the highest energy standards in the UK for an energy performance retrofit.

Lori McElroy, Director of Housing and Energy (Scotland) at the Building Research Establishment, said: “We’re pleased to help with the planning behind this project, which is taking innovative thinking to the next stage by demonstrating a clear solution to a complex issue. We are committed to supporting organisations to deliver the Scottish Government’s Energy Efficient Scotland targets and look forward to measuring and monitoring the project to ensure the best possible outcomes.”

Sarah Buchanan, Innovation Manager, Construction Scotland Innovation Centre, said: “We are delighted to be working with Renfrewshire Council and other partners on this innovative project which will bring positive change to the lives of the tenants whilst also creating economic development for Scotland and of course improving carbon emissions. There are an estimated 250,000 crosswall properties across the UK and this pilot project creates an affordable solution for housing stock which can be rolled out at scale.”

The project is part-funded through £1.8million secured from the UK Government Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Whole House Retrofit competition.

Primary - Heriot - HT, DHT and P2, P5 and P6 pupils - 17 Jan 2020 - JCON (23)

Pupils and teachers at two Paisley schools were over the moon to find out their latest positive inspection results.

Primary - Heriot - HT, DHT and P2, P5 and P6 pupils - 17 Jan 2020 - JCON (23)

Heriot Primary School and Mary Russell School received high praise by Education Scotland for their schools’ progress on improving attainment for children and young people.

Heriot primary was praised for the headteacher’s leadership within the school and the teachers’ creative approaches to learning numeracy and mathematics.

The positive, supportive and inclusive culture within Mary Russell was noted as making for confident children and young people who are achieving a range of national qualifications and wider awards.

Pupils talked positively about their schools, particularly on how they are benefitting from their schools’ ethos.

One pupil at Mary Russell said: “This school is a community and a family. I get lots of support.”

Another pupil added: “We get lots of support to help us decide what to study at college, or what job we want to get. We have visitors who come in and talk to us about our future options.”

At Heriot primary, pupils spoke of their love of maths.

One pupil said: “My favourite subject is maths. It gets your brain going and the teachers give us a challenge, which is fun.”

Another pupil added: “We use the blueprint boards, pictures and materials, like cereal and playdough, to learn maths.”

Hilary Paterson, Headteacher of Heriot primary, added: “I’m incredibly proud to be the Headteacher of Heriot Primary School and our very positive inspection report reflects the dedication and commitment of our staff team.

“Together we continually strive to improve our practice to better support our children and community and improve outcomes for all. We are delighted that our inspection team identified how highly-motivated, engaged and confident our children are due to the nurturing and creative approaches we use at Heriot.”

Headteacher of Mary Russell School, Julie McCallum, said: “We are delighted with the outcomes of the report and especially pleased that inspectors recognised the strong, positive ethos and inclusive culture in our school which is built on our school values.

“Our approaches to wellbeing are improving outcomes for our learners and are leading to positive and sustained destinations for our young people on leaving school.

“Our thanks go to everyone who is involved in the work of our school, our pupils, staff, parents and partners to ensure we continue to deliver high quality outcomes for children and young people with additional support needs.

“Our whole learning community is very proud of what we have achieved and is testament to our school motto of Be All We Can Be! Be Proud of Who We Are!”

To view the inspection reports, visit https://education.gov.scot/education-scotland.

single cover

Lisa has a lot happening in January before she heads off to Holland leave us in peace for a few months.

Her new single No More Time comes out on 31 January, followed shortly after by a video for the song and there is a single launch gig in Paisley at CC’s on 31 January.

lisa and new guitar

The video was funded by a grant from Creative Scotland Time to Shine.

As well as her single launch, its a send off, the last gig in UK until August and an early birthday party as she will be in Holland by time she is 20 on 6th February.

Im obviously keen to get as much attention for it as possible, especially as it has taken her a year to get to a place where she was ready to launch new music to the big bad world. I dont have the final copy of the video yet but will be happy to share it with you and a link to the single once its live.

Its not the Chef funded Paisley song but one she wrote a while back. She is also setting herself the challenge of writing and producing the Paisley song before she heads off. We might get a draft of it at the gig at CCs, Im not sure though.

electric warehouse

No More Time was written about 2 years ago but its release was delayed by Lisa’s mental health break earlier this year. The song is about one of the experiences that contributed to her depression, a very toxic relationship which she took her time to extricate herself from. Its positive though as its celebrating finally being able to make the break.

single cover

Its very unlike her previous material.  Lisa’s first time playing electric guitar on a track and she also produced a lot of it herself which was a major challenge at times but turned out well in the end.

Visit and Like Lisa’s Facebook page to keep informed about upcoming gigs/

Partners at the Bargeddie plant

A unique new contract will see a minimum of 90% of Renfrewshire’s waste transformed into energy as the area meets the Scottish Government’s landfill ban.

Partners at the Bargeddie plant

The £700 million, 25-year Clyde Valley Residual Waste Project between East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, North Ayrshire, North Lanarkshire and Renfrewshire Council and Viridor is now underway and will serve almost one-sixth of Scotland’s population.

It will see up to 190,000 tonnes of general waste diverted from landfill and converted to low-carbon energy and is expected provide a net saving of almost 50,000 tonnes of CO2e every year.

It will also deliver a guaranteed minimum increase in recycling for Renfrewshire, further enhancing the area’s growing environmental prospects having seen its recycling rate improve every quarter since December 2018.

Councillor Cathy McEwan, Convener of Renfrewshire Council’s Infrastructure, Land and Environment Policy Board, said: “A key priority of the council is tackling climate change and this project will make a significant difference to the level of C02 we produce by improving the way we deal with our waste.

“Anything that cannot be recycled will now no longer go to landfill and will be transformed into energy instead, making a real difference to our environment and taking our commitment to recycling to a new level.

“Our teams have been working hard over the last decade to make this a reality and we’re looking forward to working with our partnership authorities to ensure that the project achieves the environmental aims it sets out.”

This is the first partnership of its kind in Scotland and will see household waste taken from Renfrewshire and the other local authorities to a Materials Recovery Facility, where it will be further separated to remove recyclable materials before it is treated to produce a refuse derived fuel.

Then, at the brand-new Energy Recover Facility at Dunbar, it is burned at high temperatures, under carefully controlled conditions to produce 258GWh of low-carbon electricity for the national grid – enough to power more than 70,000 homes.

Steven Don, Viridor’s Head of Local Authority Contracts Scotland, said: “The Bargeddie Hub is now receiving waste as part of this contract just in time for the very busy post-festive season period.

“The Clyde Valley Partnership is an excellent example of how local authorities can work together to deliver effective waste management and contribute to a circular economy in Scotland.

“The sophisticated technology at Bargeddie improves recycling and non-recyclable waste treatment, maximising the opportunities to recycle while putting non-recyclable waste to work to generate electricity.”

The contract will also see Viridor deliver a number of community benefits, including annual apprenticeships, educational school visits and training workshops for businesses.

For more information on Renfrewshire’s approach to waste and recycling, visit www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/mybins.

St John Bosco Nursery Painting

Renfrewshire Council is recruiting for dozens of senior and entry-level jobs in nurseries across the area.

Ashlie McLaughlan is an Early Years Graduate at Heriot Early Learning and Childcare Class in Paisley, and says learning on-the-job is what’s great about working in nurseries.

St John Bosco Nursery Painting

St John Bosco Nursery Painting

“Being able to learn on-the-job in the early years sector is hugely important and it has helped me get where I am today.

“I’ve always wanted to work with children and support their learning and development and to make a difference in their lives. I’ve worked in several Renfrewshire nurseries, including Hillview Nursery, St Margaret’s ELCC and now Heriot ELCC, for around 14 years now. I have loved every single moment.

“The role of early years graduate is fairly new and it’s great that there are new positions emerging that give nursery staff the chance to progress in their career. Having already achieved my BA in Childhood Practice and been on the Froebel CPD course, I felt that it was the right move for me to take that next step in my journey and work with staff to embed creative, natural and open-ended play within the nursery.

“Sharing our learning with each other is important and I encourage all team members, long-standing or new in post, to contribute to our shared knowledge and learning. I also work with staff members on training to promote our Frobelian approach to early learning.

“Ensuring our parents know what their child does at nursery and sharing their learning experiences is vital too. When we bake scones together, we make sure to share pictures and recipes with families so they can bake at home too.

“Parents know they can contact us at any time to talk about how their child is doing, and they can stay and play in nursery whenever they want. Our door is always open.

“Our children are enjoying being in nursery for longer days too. Having children in nursery all day lets them explore play in more depth and they are progressing better in their learning.

“If the children are engaged in play before lunch, they know they can get back to it after they’ve eaten. It’s also helped friendships develop and deepen, which in turn is helping children get ready for primary school.

“Working in early years is definitely a career that makes a difference to children and their families. It is a supportive profession and there are plenty of learning and development opportunities.

“If you are thinking about taking a step up, or just interesting in getting your first job in a nursery, I would 100% say go for it.”

To apply for an Early Years Graduate role and other positions, visit www.myjobscotland.gov.uk.

PAC Guide Launch

THE world premiere of John Byrne’s new play, Underwood Lane is one of the highlights of a packed programme of music, theatre, comedy, dance and literature coming to Renfrewshire in the next few months.

PAC Guide Launch

The musical play set in Paisley tells the story of a young skiffle band trying to make the big time.

Artist and playwright, Byrne has written Underwood Lane in memory of his close friend and fellow Buddie, singer-songwriter Gerry Rafferty who died nine years ago this month.

PAC Guide Launch

Byrne is one of Scotland’s most talented artists and writers and is best known for his paintings, theatrical masterpieces like The Slab Boys Trilogy and the hit TV shows, Tutti Frutti and Your Cheatin’ Heart.

The play – a co-production from Renfrewshire Leisure and Glasgow’s Tron Theatre – is being premiered at Paisley Arts Centre between Thursday, June 25 and Sunday, June 28. This will be the last show at Paisley Arts Centre before it closes for refurbishment this summer.

PAC Guide Launch

More information about the Underwood Road performances and a host of other events, shows and performances being staged in Renfrewshire are featured in the recently-published What’s On booklet, The Guide for Spring 2020.

The Guide – available to download from www.renfrewshireleisure.com or picked up from all Renfrewshire Leisure sports facilities and venues – details how there is something for everyone when it comes to entertainment, events and stimulating talks and classes at local venues.

There is a strong programme for families including The Shark in the Park Musical show, based on the popular Nick Sharratt’s children’s books, which is being staged at Johnstone Town Hall, on Wednesday February 26.

Children and adults will also be able to enjoy the Easter Fun Day with circus-themed activities along with arts and crafts, at Johnstone Town Hall, on Saturday, April 11.

A not-to-be-missed theatre performance from Arabella Weir, star of TV’s The Fast Show and Two Doors Down, is at Paisley Arts Centre, on Friday, March 27. A best-selling author and actor, Arabella’s show is called Does My Mum Loom Big In This? as she takes to the stage to describe some hilarious anecdotes from her dysfunctional childhood.

Traditional Celtic music at its best can be heard when The Tannahill Weavers play Paisley Arts Centre on Saturday, February 15. And the Scottish Alternative Music Awards return to Paisley Arts Centre for the third year, on Friday and Saturday, March 13 and 14.

For the first time a Paisley Book Festival is being held at various venues between Thursday, February 20 and Saturday, February 29 with the central theme of Radical Voices and Rebel Stories.

Chairperson of Renfrewshire Leisure, Councillor Lisa-Marie Hughes said: “We have a wonderful array of entertainment and events planned for the next few months.

“We’re really excited about the world premiere of John Byrne’s Underwood Lane, which is a play written by a Paisley Buddie, about Paisley and being performed for the first time in Paisley. I’m sure the shows will be a sell-out.

“There’s definitely something for everyone in the latest issue of The Guide whether its music, theatre, dance, children’s entertainment or literature that people enjoy.”

Foster Parents. Renfrewshire council

More kind-hearted people in Renfrewshire are giving looked-after children and young people a loving home than ever before.

Last year, six more households became foster carers after they reached out to the Council’s fostering and adoption team.

Foster Parents. Renfrewshire council

Foster Parents. Renfrewshire council

There is also 71 per cent more children and young people being looked after by aunts and uncles, grandparents or family friends, known as kinship care, than there was 10 years ago.

More than half of all looked-after children and young people are placed in kinship care or with foster carers, but the service is always looking for more people to open their heart and give a child or young person a loving home.

Education and Children’s Services Policy Board Convener, Councillor Jim Paterson, said: “Giving children and young people the chance of a positive, brighter future is one of the most rewarding things that people can do, and it takes all kinds of people to support all types of children.

“To foster, you need to be in good health, be over 21 years-old and have enough living space to accommodate a child or young person.

“It doesn’t matter if you are single or unmarried, rent a property, are unemployed or what your religious background or sexual orientation is.

“Foster placements can be a short break, interim or permanent. For those just starting out, short breaks or interim are often the best options.

“If you’re interested in becoming a foster carer, you can find out what it entails without making a commitment. Just get in touch with our fostering and adoptions team.”

Potential foster carers can learn more about fostering and the children and young people who need a foster placement at a group preparation session. Attendance at the group session is required before a formal application to become a foster carer can be made.

To find out more about becoming a foster carer, call the fostering and adoption team on 0300 300 1199, email childrenandfamilies@renfrewshire.gov.uk or visit www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/fostering.

YSOC

A survey has been launched seeking the views of Paisley town centre residents and visitors following a six-week intervention designed to build safer and stronger communities.

Link: socsi.in/Follow_up_survey_for_Paisley_town_centre_7fejpsocsi.in/Follow_up_survey_for_Paisley_town_centre_7fejp

YSOC

Led by Police Scotland, the Your Home, Your Street, Our Community programme is supported by Renfrewshire Council, Engage Renfrewshire, the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service, Renfrewshire Leisure and the Renfrewshire Health and Social Care Partnership, alongside Paisley First, and sets out to tackle the issues that matter to local residents.

Police at Paisley Abbey

A survey was carried out inviting local people and businesses to have their say on how to make Paisley town centre safer and an action plan was devised to tackle the main issues.

This was the first time that the initiative had tackled a town centre which brought fresh challenges for the working group having previously worked in wider community areas.

It addressed perceived problems including antisocial behaviour, drug offences and night-time safety, with actions such as additional police and warden patrols, mobile CCTV, taxi marshalling at weekends and enforcement action to tackle illegal parking.

Detective Chief Inspector Douglas Falconer, Renfrewshire & Inverclyde Division said: “The Paisley town centre initiative is an excellent example of how partnership working can benefit the entire community.

“We listened to what the people of Paisley have raised as their main issues to date and over the past few weeks have addressed many of those concerns.

“We have provided high visibility patrols to reassure and offer advice and guidance to local residents around specific issues such as personal safety and antisocial behaviour.

“We would encourage anyone living or visiting Paisley town centre to continue to let us know of any concerns they have, in order that we help make Paisley town centre a safer place for all.”

Paisley town centre is the latest area to benefit from the programme following successful interventions in Shortroods, Erskine, Ferguslie and Gallowhill, where the work carried out noted a significant decrease in the issues initially identified by residents in those areas.

Councillor Marie McGurk, Convener of Renfrewshire Council’s Communities, Housing and Planning Policy Board, said: “This campaign has made a fantastic difference in a number of communities in Renfrewshire which had been facing issues affecting the safety of people in the area – and Paisley town centre was the latest.

“All the partners involved in the project worked hard to listen to what local people told us were the main issues and implemented actions to make a difference.

“We’ve seen a visible change in to the town centre, but we want to know what local people think as we evaluate the campaign and plan our ongoing support to maintain any improvements.

“Please fill out the survey and let us know how you thought the campaign went and what Paisley town centre is like today.”

Anyone can take part in the survey, which closes at midnight on Sunday 26 January, at www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/YourHomeYourStreet.

Paisley Museum

Plans to completely transform Paisley Museum into a world-class visitor destination telling the town’s unique stories including that of the globally admired, Paisley pattern, have taken a major step forward as The National Lottery Heritage Fund today announced £3.83million support for the project.

Paisley Museum

The four buildings which make up Scotland’s first municipal museum, including the country’s first public observatory, will be ambitiously re-designed and extended by an award-winning international team, including  the architects AL_A and exhibition designers Opera Amsterdam, to create an exciting new experience for visitors.

Paisley Museum

The new, contemporary galleries and exhibitions will double the number of objects on display and be fully accessible so that visitors can explore the town’s rich heritage and its part in the story of the famous teardrop Paisley pattern textile, from the shawls of Kashmir to the haute couture of rock stars. Inspiring learning zones, improved social spaces, a new cafe, shop and cloakroom facilities will add to the Museum’s appeal, as will a new, welcoming entrance surrounded by a courtyard and gardens.

Paisley Museum

The revamped museum is forecast to attract 125,000 visits a year, almost four times the current numbers, and create a £79m economic boost over 30 years. It is the cornerstone of Renfrewshire Council’s vision to bring new life to the town through investment in heritage and culture. This has included the opening of the UK’s first publicly accessible high street museum store, Paisley: The Secret Collection,  and the conservation and repair of key buildings which make up the town’s historic core through a scheme funded with £2m from the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

Commenting on today’s announcement, Caroline Clark, Director Scotland of The National Lottery Heritage Fund, said:

“This project has been driven by the passion of the Paisley community to put their unique heritage on an international stage. With the help of National Lottery funding, new life will be breathed into these heritage buildings giving Paisley’s wonderful textiles and other treasures the prominence they deserve, while also bringing a new confidence to the town.”

Councillor Lisa-Marie Hughes, Chair of Renfrewshire Leisure Ltd, said: “We want to thank everyone connected to the National Lottery Heritage Fund for their fantastic support.

“It will help us deliver a world-class museum which will take the town’s unique and fascinating stories to new audiences, showcase Paisley’s internationally-significant collections, and bring new life and footfall to the wider area.

“It will create a new accessible hub at the heart of life in the town for the local community – local groups are already co-producing the incredible stories which will populate the reopened museum, and we look forward to continuing to work with The National Lottery Heritage Fund and others over the years ahead to deliver on that.”

The new museum is expected to open in 2022.

Industry & Management 4.0 Eventbrite 2160x1080px v2

EVENT INVITATION

Industry & Management 4.0

What does that mean for you?

 

Thursday 6 February, Abercorn Building, Paisley

Industry & Management 4.0 Eventbrite 2160x1080px v2

Have you thought about what good management will look like in the future?

Are you making best use of your people and systems?

Is your team operating at optimum performance?

At West College Scotland we provide solutions to those questions through project-driven management and leadership training programmes to support you to tackle your business challenges and prepare for change.

Our training packages provide immediate impact for managers, leaders and the organisation.

Join us at our business breakfast on Thursday 6 February at 8am to find out more!

To register visit: http://bit.ly/30gLY1B