Glasgow Airport

Airport receives British Safety Council’s International Safety Award with a Distinction for second year in a row –

Glasgow Airport has scooped an International Safety Award for protecting its employees from the risk of injury and ill health at work.

The airport has won an International Safety Award with a Distinction from the British Safety Council in recognition of its commitment to keeping its workers and workplaces healthy and safe during the 2020 calendar year.

Glasgow Airport

The airport, owned by AGS Airports Ltd along with Aberdeen and Southampton airports, is one of only 85 organisations worldwide to win a Distinction in the International Safety Awards 2021. The awards also recognise organisations that have shown commitment to wellbeing and mental health.

Graeme Robertson, health and safety manager at Glasgow Airport, said: “The health and safety of our staff continues to be an overarching priority for everyone who works at Glasgow Airport, so we are tremendously proud to have received this award with distinction from the British Safety Council for the second year running.

“It is especially significant to be recognised for our efforts in the year we experienced the onset of COVID-19 – one of the greatest health challenges of our time. Out-with ensuring the safety of our core operational staff who continued to keep the airport open to support vital lifeline services during this pandemic, the greater challenge came from supporting our wider workforce.

“The majority of our people in Glasgow – and across the wider group – have either worked from home due to COVID-19 restrictions or were on furlough for a period of time, so supporting their mental health and well-being while making sure they felt connected with their colleagues during lockdown was absolutely critical last year and this work continues to this day.”

 

The airport also received the NHS Health Working Lives Gold award in 2020 for ensuring a healthy workplace. Staff at the airport and wider group benefit from an extensive occupational health service from trained advisors or physicians including physiotherapy, podiatry and access to mental-health support with each delivered in keeping with all COVID-19 guidance.

During the pandemic staff have also gained access to an employee assistance programme, online training resources to keep their competency skills up to date and a confidential telephone support service for emotional and practical problems, medical and legal information and immediate crisis intervention. Live broadcast mental health fitness and well-being sessions were also available to staff across the AGS Airports Ltd group.

Mike Robinson, chief executive of the British Safety Council, congratulated Glasgow Airport on their success in winning an International Safety Award 2021 with a Distinction: “The British Safety Council applauds Glasgow Airport and it’s AGS Group-wide Assurance Team on their achievement. The award is in recognition of their commitment and hard work to keep their employees and workplaces free of injury and ill health.

“The vision of the British Safety Council is that no-one should be injured or made ill through their work – anywhere in the world. Achieving this requires more than complying with legislation; it means people committed not only to health and safety but also more and more to workplace wellbeing and impelling others to follow suit.”

“Our heartfelt congratulations to Glasgow Airport. All of those working at the airport should be enormously proud of their achievement.”

Now in their 63rd year, the International Safety Awards recognise and celebrate organisations from around the world which have demonstrated to the satisfaction of the scheme’s independent judges their commitment to preventing workplace injuries and work-related ill-healthduring the previous calendar year.

 

The awards also recognise organisations that have shown commitment to wellbeing and mental health at work. To find out more about the British Safety Council here.

Laura (right) and Chell 3

A PAISLEY cancer survivor is inspiring people to Race for Life at Home and carry on the fight against the disease as the nation looks beyond lockdown.

Laura Elliot, who recently completed treatment for thyroid cancer, is urging people to run, walk or jog 5K for Cancer Research UK.

The Project Co-ordinator will be cheering on thousands of people from across the UK who have vowed to Race for Life at Home this April either alone or in small, socially distanced groups to raise money for life-saving research.

People can visit raceforlife.orgto sign up to Race for Life at Home for £5* then receive a Race pack which includes a medal.  Money raised will help scientists find new ways to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer, helping to save more lives.

Cancer Research UK is predicting a staggering £300 million drop in income caused by COVID-19 over the next three years which could put future medical breakthroughs at risk.

All 400 mass-participation Race for Life events across the UK were cancelled last year to protect the country’s health during the pandemic. And as the country emerges from lockdown the charity’s much-loved Race for Life events which were scheduled for this spring and early summer have also now been postponed.

Laura (right) and Chell 3

But Laura, who has just celebrated her 33rd birthday with her twin sister Chell, knows exactly how vital it is to keep raising funds for life-saving research.

She said: “My reaction to finding out I had cancer was to keep it to myself as much as possible. I didn’t want to burden anyone. But having had major surgery and coming to terms with a cancer diagnosis was hard. I shared more with my mum, who never missed an appointment with me, than anyone else but I kept so many of my feelings to myself.

“In the end it got too much and it was a relief to get some help from the Rays of Hope cancer support group in Elderslie. It was such a relief to talk openly about how I was feeling. Everyone there had experienced a different type of cancer and talking with them helped me come to terms with what had happened.

“I’m certain that the treatment I received saved my life. That’s why I decided to support Cancer Research UK by taking on the charity’s Walk All Over Cancer challenge to walk 10,000 steps every day in March.

“I wanted to do what I could to give something back for the treatment that’s got me through this. I also want to help to make treatments better and kinder, ultimately to find a cure for this awful illness.

“I’d really urge others to support the charity too. Race For Life at Home is a fantastic chance to do something positive this month and raise money to help more people survive.”

Laura first suspected something was amiss with her health when she found she was losing her voice and she noticed her neck was getting bigger. She was gaining weight for no obvious reason and she began to feel tired all the time.

“I was on every diet imaginable but still putting on weight,” recalls Laura, who was aged 31 at the time. “I then started coughing and I didn’t smoke. I worried the cough was to do with my asthma. I had a sore throat and swollen glands.

“I decided to get it checked out and went to the GP three times altogether. On early visits, the doctor did blood tests which came back normal and I was prescribed an antibacterial throat spray and a steriod inhaler to help with my asthma. In the meantime, my neck was getting bigger and bigger.”

Laura eventually went for tests at the ENT department of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Glasgow. These revealed that Laura’s thyroid was to blame for her symptoms and would need to be removed.

“The thing I worried about most was that after the operation there was a risk I’d need a temporary tracheotomy – a tube in my neck so I could breathe,” Laura said. “The idea made me panic and I wanted to tell the doctors just to leave it. I was scared and nervous because I hadn’t ever had surgery before. But ultimately, I felt glad something was happening to make me better at last. I felt confident in the surgeon, that he was a specialist and that this was the right thing to do.”

Laura was in hospital for three days after the five-hour operation to remove her thyroid.

“The first thing I checked when I woke up was to see if there was a tube in my neck,” she said. “I was so relieved to find out that this hadn’t been needed. But I was shocked by the size of the scar.”

Tests on Laura’s thyroid revealed that various sized cancerous tumours had been growing there and was wrapped around her vocal cords and had spread to the lymph nodes.

She was told the news at a check-up with a consultant in September 2019.

Laura said: “I couldn’t believe it when the consultant told me I had papillary thyroid cancer. I went white and started shaking. I knew what he was saying but couldn’t take it in.”

In October 2019, Laura started radioactive iodine treatment at the Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre to destroy any remaining cancer cells and reduce the risk of the cancer returning.

This meant Laura was given an iodine pill and then had to stay in complete isolation in hospital for two days while the radioactive treatment took effect. Even on her return to her home in Paisley, which she shares with her parents, she had to steer clear of everyone in the house for a few days and ensure that she cleaned the bathroom and kitchen after she’d used it. Even her beloved cats Tango and Lennon, who normally sleep in her bedroom, weren’t allowed near.

And while she is recovering well, Laura says her experience has had a significant impact on her mental health.

She said: “I’ve always been a confident person but what I’ve been through has dented that. There has been lasting damage to my voice. I still have trouble speaking and I now speak at a higher pitch, so much so I worry I sound like a little girl. I can’t have a full conversation without my voice going away and I feel it’s such a strain to talk.

“Removing the thyroid has also led to imbalances in my hormones. I’m up and down with them and I find I can be really tearful now.

“Being busy at work has helped to keep my mind off things, as has keeping things going with family life. I love to look after my nine-year-old nephew Caiden and taking on regular exercise has given me a boost. My mum, dad and sister have been there every step of the way and I want to thank them very much.

“I’m just so glad I kept going back to the doctor when things weren’t right. I’m lucky the cancer was caught early and was treatable.”

Cancer Research UK’s Race for Life, in partnership with Tesco, is an inspiring series of 3K, 5K, 10K, Pretty Muddy and Pretty Muddy Kids events which raise millions of pounds every year to help beat cancer by funding crucial research.

 A live broadcast on the Cancer Research UK Race for Life Facebook and Race for Life Instagram pages on Saturday April 24th will include an energiser from a fitness expert as well as inspirational messages of support from people who have been through cancer. Participants are then invited to run, walk or jog 5K. Organisers are also inviting participants to share photos and videos on social media using the hashtag #RaceatHome

Every year around 32,400 people are diagnosed with cancer in Scotland** and one in two people in the UK born after 1960 will get cancer in their lifetime.*** But the good news is more people are surviving the disease now than ever before. Cancer survival in the UK has doubled since the early 1970s and Cancer Research UK’s work has been at the heart of that progress.

Linda Summerhayes, Cancer Research UK’s spokesperson in Scotland, said: “The truth is, COVID-19 has slowed us down.

 “But we will never stop and we are absolutely determined to continue to create better cancer treatments for tomorrow.  Even though we have to Race for Life differently this spring, nothing is going to stop us running, walking or jogging 5K to raise money to help beat cancer.

“That’s why we need as many people as possible across Scotland to sign up to Race for Life at Home this April, to stand united and do something extraordinary to help beat cancer.

 “We’re constantly monitoring the COVID-19 situation and are working hard to move our mass participation  Race for Life events to the autumn and to make sure they can go ahead safely and with all necessary COVID-19 guidelines in place.****

 “We’d love to invite as many people as possible to Race for Life at Home this spring, then physically come together in the autumn to join us for Race for Life Glasgow.”

A new date this autumn has not yet been confirmed for Race for Life Glasgow and an announcement will be made as soon as possible.

Sign up to Race for Life at Home this April and visit raceforlife.orgor call 0300 123 0770. Join in and share with #RaceatHome

kalka mash

KALKA was created by Gillian McCormick and is based in Paisley, Scotland.

It is a brand that was born during a time of great uncertainty when a global pandemic forced the world to slow down. Initially, it seemed our freedom had been taken from us, but it soon became apparent that we were now freer than ever! We had been given the chance to change our world and the way we live in it which encouraged a clearer view of what matters. As a new brand, we welcomed the opportunity for growth and new beginnings which is always a source of inspiration for new designs.

kalka mash

 

Based in Paisley, we take great pride in finding inspiration from our surroundings although our designs are not exclusive to the people of our town. We focus on natural influences and make our products from organic fabrics in order to support a sustainable future for our planet.

It is important to us that our customers receive the highest quality of products and excellent service. We encourage people to get in touch and work with us to create original pieces which you truly love to wear.Kalka Designs

You can find us on our website please feel free to browse our products.

paisley-abbey-logos

CBD has become a difficult topic to discuss due to the confusion over its legality and ingredients. This is in part due to hearing a lot about the relaxation of cannabis laws in the United States on social media, which of course is not a trend the UK is prepared to follow any time soon.

Instead, CBD is extracted from the cannabis plant but contains none of the THC, which is the substance that makes users high. CBD boasts many of the benefits that cannabis does but without the psychoactive element attached. At the start of 2015, CBD was illegal. By the end of 2015, you could buy CBD UK with a click of the button.

As reported recently in the news, Kelly Tweedie from Paisley tells her story about how the brothers behind a CBD startup venture have completely changed her life, ending years of traumatic pain. Kelly has developed SPD, which is a symphysis pubis dysfunction, causing great pain to her hips, back, and legs.

No painkiller was effective enough to take away her pain, but a half dozen drops of CBD had eradicated her suffering entirely. This touches on how CBD became really big, really fast. Stories like Kelly’s spread rapidly, with lots of different illnesses being dramatically improved with the help of CBD.

Besides helping many rare illnesses and chronic pain, it’s also become a way to treat anxiety. This is perhaps the biggest reason why CBD went from obscure medicinal properties to a supplement that can help the everyday person, though the research on anxiety is still premature.

Very quickly, CBD became a trend. If the amount of people taking it seems overwhelming, so is the amount of sellers on the market. Many products have arisen under the umbrella of CBD, such as CBD food, drinks, hair, skincare products, and many more.

Because of its anti-inflammatory qualities, it is commonly used to treat both arthritis and acne, meaning the health and skincare industry is riding this wave in demand. Of course, sellers cannot make direct health claims unless they undergo formal licensing, which is why “wellbeing” is a highly common term used to make the claims vaguer.

It is also thought that CBD can help relieve symptoms from cancer treatments, such as pain, vomiting, and nausea. Whilst there are some studies backing up these claims, research is still in its infancy relative to other supplements and medicinal products, and should always be discussed with a doctor first.

This is why research should be undertaken by customers to see if scientific studies support the claims they’re suggesting, as there are a lot of claims being made.

Is CBD safe?

The ultimate question when researching boils down to “Is it safe?” because if it is, users can always measure their own experience and benefits with the product themselves – placebo or not, it may be worth trying. The World Health Organisation claims that “To date, there is no evidence of public health-related problems associated with the use of pure CBD”.

Ultimately, CBD is a safe product for consumption. Getting a doctor’s advice may be a good idea, particularly when taking other medicine, but generally, there is no reason to conflate CBD oil with the risks of cannabis in i

covid-test
Residents of Ferguslie in Paisley have been thanked as the results of a one-week community testing blitz designed to help drive down rates of Covid19 in the area are revealed.
covid-test

A drop in testing site was open in St Ninian’s Church Hall for one week from Wednesday 24 March, and anyone without symptoms of the virus who lived or worked in the area were invited to come along.

The site was run and staffed by Renfrewshire Council and the results were as follows:

– 327 people attended the unit, with 2 positive tests (0.6%)

Chris Dalrymple, the council’s chief environmental health officer, said: “Our thanks go out to all residents of Ferguslie Park who came along to get a test.

“It was great to see a good turnout – around 8% of the local population – which compares well to other sites in other areas of the country.

“Not everyone who has Covid19 shows symptoms and the fact the testing identified people who could have been passing it on to those around them without knowing made it worthwhile.

“Thank you again for helping protect your loved ones and your community.”

The test in use was lateral flow tests. These are quick tests that are processed on site and see results returned via text message within 45 minutes.

rukeri

The team at Rukeri have been busy behind the scenes getting ready for the new season. From turf production and maintenance to bagging their customers favourite aggregates, a lot has been happening to ensure a smooth start to the 2021 season.

Rukeri Bags

Rukeri has been growing and supplying turf for 8 years from North Arkleston Farm in Paisley. The company has expanded year on year and now offers a wide range of landscaping supplies that includes organic soils, decorative aggregates (good old garden chuckies!), barks, sands and fencing and decking materials. Rukeri Turf is highly regarded within the landscaping industry, with many customers claiming it to be the best in Scotland!

Like most companies, Rukeri faced a lot of challenges when they reopened after the first lock down. Some products were harder than others to source as manufacturing had reduced dramatically or stopped altogether, and the social distancing measures meant that all business operations had to be looked at and developed to ensure the safety of staff and customers. The upshot this year is that all processes have been practiced and the team are confident of delivering all orders in a COVID secure manner.

Lisa Taylor, Marketing Manager at Rukeri says, ‘Despite the challenges faced last year we are acutely aware of how fortunate we were to be busy and able to still trade. The ‘Stay at Home’ message was heeded by our customers and we are glad that we were able to help transform outdoor spaces during a troubling time. 

rukeri

We are looking forward to what is already proving to be a busy season. Our lead time is currently around 5 – 6 days so we urge customers to order early to avoid any disappointment, and we hope that more residents of Renfrewshire will be enjoying their new gardens from Rukeri in time for summer!’

All products available can be viewed from their yard in Paisley. They are on display in a colourful area that gives customers the chance to get a ‘real feel’ for them. Visitors are asked to follow the one-way system on site, follow current social distancing guidelines and wear a mask when in the office. Alternatively, orders can be placed online at www.rukeri.com

JNI Beaver Scout

The JNI Beaver Scout Colony returned to outdoor activities for the first time in over a year. Enjoying warm and sunny weather in Ferguslie Gardens the Beavers took part in an Easter egg hunt which covered a wide area of the park and ensured they returned home tired.

JNI Beaver Scout

With the older members having joined the Cubs over the last year the Colony is looking to recruit girls and boys aged between 5 ¾ and 8 years old. In the Beavers, they have fun while going on adventures and making friends. There are opportunities to try new things while completing challenge and activity badges. The JNI is enjoying outdoor adventures before being permitted to return to our own activity centre in The Bield in Broomlands Street. The Colony returns to take on a Challenge Badge with everyone learnings skills for life.

For more details contact stephen@thejni.org.uk

Facebook   7th Paisley and District (JNI) Scout Group

Website   www.thejni.org.uk

Twitter  @7thjniscouts

Instagram @jniscouts

west end growing grounds

The West End Growing Grounds Association is registered charity that  provides a community garden on a high-profile site in Underwood Road  Paisley. It consists of 112 raised beds and two polytunnels for the local  community to grow its own food. The Association is looking for an  enthusiastic, physically fit experienced grounds person to assist its  members in managing the maintenance and development of the Garden.  

west end growing grounds

The volunteer will report directly to the Board of Trustees and liaise with the  Board’s horticultural lead member and the local Community Pay-back Team  Leader.  

Duties include:  

Working with board members, discuss and provide information on best  practice grounds maintenance and safety.  

Operation and maintenance of electric powered ground tools (mower, strimmer,  hedge cutter, leaf blower).  

Water management. (Hose reel mains supply and water harvesting system)  

Organising members’ common area work parties. (Members are required to  complete 12 hours of common area work each year)  

Identifying and arranging work that may require Community Pay-back Team  assistance.  

Hours:  

This is a new appointment, and the nature and extent of the above duties will  be reviewed in consultation with the person appointed. 

If this volunteering opportunity interests you, please contact:  The Association Secretary at 07710 782510 e-mail contact@wegga.org

FAMILIES can enjoy an eggs-travaganza of fun events and activities during the Easter break from the comfort of their own home.

Renfrewshire Leisure Arts, Libraries and Museums teams have created an exciting programme of online events for children and grown-ups that would have the Easter Bunny jumping for joy.

All the events and activities – from theatre performances and music sessions to arts and crafts and library workshops – are easy to access by logging on to www.renfrewshireleisure.com . The majority of the events are free to access online.

For the youngest audiences, Ipdip Theatre present Up and Down at 10.30am and noon on April 12.  This is an adventure on Zoom for children under five, giving them a chance to connect to distanced friends and relatives who are encouraged to join the fun.  There is a £3 charge to view this event.

The over-fives will love M6 Theatre’s beautiful short film When We Started Singing, exclusively on the Ren TV online channel from April 12-18.

For 11-15 year olds The Big Data Show by Civic Digits is a ground-breaking, immersive theatre experience using performance, gaming and digital magic being shown online 10am on April 7, or 7pm on April 14.  There is a £3 charge to view this event.

And youngsters can shake, rattle and roll with TRASH percussion, at 10am on April 17, or enjoy some gentle movement and simple crafts at Balloon Babies, 10am on April 10.

Scotland’s top musicians continue to entertain with Sally Simpson and Catriona Hawksworth on fiddle and piano – and Valerie Barr on classical accordion, our Sunday Continental brunch-time boogie sessions will be recorded live for you to enjoy.

And don’t forget the weekly Stuck In The House Music sessions on Ren TV every Thursday, at 8pm.

They are encouraging people of all ages and abilities to become inspired to create a piece of art based on the outdoors. The artwork could be in the form of collages, sculptures, or photographs. If you submit a photograph of your artwork to the Renfrewshire Leisure website, there’s a chance it could be included in the online exhibition.

There are also two Library Workshops broadcast on Ren TV, on April 7 and 14 at 10am. The first is Wooly Easter Crafts and the second is Growing Green.

Renfrewshire Leisure’s Arts Manager, Rikki Payne said: “Our Easter programme this year is all about entertaining, informing and passing on new skills to young and old alike.

“Although our venues remain closed due to Covid restrictions, we’ve pulled out all the stops to bring a wide range of quality events and activities into people’s homes.

“The emphasis is on fun and there’s plenty for young and old to enjoy.”

The Easter events are made possible with the support of Future Paisley – the radical and wide-ranging programme of events, activity and investment using the town’s unique and internationally-significant cultural stories to transform its future.

street stuff logo

There’s plenty of opportunity to get active this spring when Street Stuff activities resume next week.

Evening activities will return from Monday 5 April, with extra afternoon sessions running throughout the school holidays, bringing free football and outdoor sport to local communities across Renfrewshire.

street stuff logo

Anyone aged 8-16 is welcome to join in and there is no cost to take part. All participants will need to provide contact details for Test and Protect and follow Covid guidelines, including wearing a facemask when not participating. Hand sanitiser stations and wipes will be available at each venue.

Young people can go along to the following sessions:

Monday 5 and 12 Apr
Durrockstock Park, Foxbar from 1:30pm – 4:30pm
Blackstoun Road, Ferguslie from 6:30pm – 9:30pm

Tuesday 6 and 13 Apr
Arkleston Primary School, Renfrew from 1:30pm – 4:30pm
McMaster Centre, Johnstone from 6:30pm – 9:30pm

Wednesday 7 and 14 Apr
Blackstoun Road, Ferguslie from 1:30pm – 4:30pm
Arkleston Primary School, Renfrew from 6:30pm – 9:30pm

Thursday 8 and 15 Apr
McMaster Centre, Johnstone from 1:30pm – 4:30pm
Our Lady of Peace Primary School, Linwood from 6:30pm – 9:30pm

Friday 9 and 16 Apr
Our Lady of Peace Primary School, Linwood from 1:30pm – 4:30pm
Durrockstock Park, Foxbar from 6:30pm – 9:30pm

Saturday 10 and 17 Apr
Barsail Primary School, Erskine from 5:30pm – 8:30pm

All activities will take place outdoors and may be subject to change or cancellation.

A free meal will be provided at afternoon sessions to ensure participants are fuelled up and ready to go.

Street Stuff is a diversionary project run in partnership between Renfrewshire Council, Police Scotland, Scottish Fire and Rescue Service, Engage Renfrewshire and St Mirren Football Club.

The programme began in 2009 in Renfrewshire contributing to a reduction in youth disorder and anti-social behaviour by 75 percent over the first five years with a sustained reduction of 65 percent.

For more information, visit www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/streetstuff.