Jacobite Receipt to Paisley Town Magistrates (1745 Rebellion)

Jacobite Receipt to Paisley Town Magistrates (1745 Rebellion)On 29 December 1745, exactly 275 years ago to the day, the Jacobites led by Bonnie Prince Charlie issued a summons to the then Paisley Town Council to meet and account for raising a local militia against them.

This summons, along with a receipt from the Prince’s Secretary for a £500 fine paid just five days later by the people of Paisley, will go on display when Paisley Museum reopens following its £42m redevelopment.

Jacobite Propaganda Medal commissioned by Charles Edward Stuart

Unlike other towns, that were also fined by the Jacobites but later reimbursed, Paisley’s money has never been returned. Glasgow received £10,000 for its loss in 1749, and in 1750 Dumfries was indemnified with £2,800, however every application Paisley made was refused.

Archie Henderson, Social History Research Assistant for Paisley Museum said: “The history of the Jacobites is full of fascinating tales and having the opportunity to reinterpret the museum’s collection, tell new stories and retell old stories in a more engaging way is all part of the museum’s redevelopment. On 30th December this year Bonnie Prince Charlie will celebrate his 300th birthday, so what better time for us to remind people of this part of our town’s history.” 

Originally, Bonnie Prince Charlie fined Paisley £1,000 and took Bailie Matthew Kyle and former Bailie William Park hostage to ensure the fine was paid. However, this fine was later reduced to £500 providing it was paid in full by the following evening. When the time came, the town only managed to pay £300, and the payment window was extended by 12 hours. At the final hour the remaining payment was made to the Jacobites and a receipt from the Prince’s Secretary John Murray of Broughton was issued.

Henderson goes on to explain: “After the Jacobites were defeated at Culloden, and money started to be repaid to other towns, Paisley Council was advised that they should take John Murray to court, which they did in 1753 and the case dragged on for seven years without success. In 1760 an appeal was launched but again there is no record of any response or positive outcome, so the debt has remained outstanding.”

It is believed that £500 in today’s money would be worth more than £100,000.

The redevelopment of the museum will enable the number of objects on display to be increased by 100%. Significant items from the Jacobite collection that will go on display alongside the summons (dated 29 Dec 1745) and the receipt (dated 3 Jan 1746) include a Culloden sword passed down from the Carlile family; a Jacobite silver medal commissioned by Bonnie Prince Charlie; a painting by David Wilkie (1819) of The Veteran Highlander; and a headstone originally from the grounds of Paisley Abbey commemorating John Orr, one of eight Paisley volunteers killed at the Battle of Falkirk in 1746.

Paisley Museum is part of the town’s radical regeneration plan, and the redesign of the campus is led by an international team including architects AL_A and exhibition designers Opera Amsterdam. When it reopens it is expected to attract over 125,000 visits each year and provide a £79 million economic boost to the area over the next 30 years.

Councillor Lisa-Marie Hughes, Chair of Renfrewshire Leisure, said: “Paisley’s collections are culturally significant and the museum’s refurbishment is a wonderful opportunity for the town to reinterpret our objects for public display in a way that is engaging and meaningful to visitors.

“It is also a real tribute to our curatorial teams past and present, that our objects are still in such good condition, and are able to illustrate the area’s rich culture and the people’s story.”

Paisley Museum Reimagined is supported by Renfrewshire Council, the National Lottery Heritage Fund and the Scottish Government’s Regeneration Capital Grant Fund. The museum’s final phase of fundraising is now under way, with the museum website reimagined.paisleymuseum.org showcasing the project’s ambitious vision.

Sma Shot after 2

A £4.5m project to restore some of Paisley town centre’s historic architecture to its former glory has now completed work at several prominent sites on and around the town’s High Street.

The Townscape Heritage/Conservation Area Regeneration Scheme (TH.CARS2) has been delivering a programme of building and outdoor streetscape improvements since 2017, and will run until 2022.

Sma Shot after 2

The project – funded and delivered by Renfrewshire Council with support from the National Lottery Heritage Fund and Historic Environment Scotland – covers a defined area within Paisley town centre around the High Street, New Street and Shuttle Street.

It includes grants for building owners to part-fund the costs of restoring and improving the town’s unique architecture. And the results of the team’s work throughout 2020 can now be seen at:

41 HS Upper - 3 after works

– a building repair project on the upper floors of the C-listed 41 High Street (above Right Way Credit Union), with major stone repair. A separate project will start in the new year and will improve the ground-floor shopfront;

– extensive improvements to the town’s much-loved Sma’ Shot Cottages – the volunteer-run museum and visitor attraction in Shuttle Street – recently repainted with conservation-grade paint along with repointing works, stone repairs, new doors and repairs to the windows, gutters and roof;

41 HS Upper - 2

– a transformation of the outside of the Print and Copy It shop at 61c High Street, which replaced the previous shopfront with a new and much improved traditional-style one;

This is the fifth historic shopfront to be restored, with work already complete at 30 A and B High St (White Cart Co and Renfrewshire Witch Hunt Experience), 36 High St (the Shelter shop), and 44 High St (Uptown Barbers).

61C HS SF After Image_Day

Work is also due to be completed before Christmas to preserve and improve the historic streetscape in George Place – restoring the cobbled street by reusing original granite setts and kerbs and adding quality Caithness paving.

61C Before Image

Further improvements to other historic buildings and shopfronts are planned for next year.

Running alongside the building-improvement work is a programme of cultural and educational activity aimed at raising awareness of the town’s heritage, including a schools weaving project, a documentary on Paisley’s Mill Girls, and a drama project on Paisley’s role in the 1820 Radical War.

Sma Shot Cottages during

The current TH.CARS work follows a similar scheme which saw major improvements to buildings and streetscape in the Causeyside Street area between 2009 and 2016.

Renfrewshire Council Leader Iain Nicolson said: “Paisley town centre’s architectural legacy is one of the finest to be found anywhere in the country, with Scotland’s second-highest concentration of listed buildings.

“The TH.CARS2 scheme has been doing great work to preserve that by helping owners bring historic buildings which have fallen into disrepair back into use, while improving the look of others by restoring original architectural features.

“That investment has two more years to run and will help make the town centre a more attractive place to live, work and invest during what we know has been a challenging time for traders.

“It is great to see a number of projects have been completed in recent months and I look forward to seeing more go on site over the next year.”

For more information on the project, see www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/THCars2

Buddie with Superbia

Buddie the Lion, the Paisley First mascot, has gone global with an autograph request this week received all the way from Little Rock, Arkansas in America! 

Buddie received the request from a young fan, Ramsey McWilliams, who is on a  quest to collect mascot autographs from all across the world. 

Buddie with Superbia

Needless to say, Buddie was only too happy to help out and a signed autograph of Paisley’s favourite lion is now winging its way to Ramsey in the  US of A! 

Buddie autograph 2

Buddie said: “Hopefully one day Ramsey and his family will be able to visit the  best town in the world which is of course Paisley!  

“In the meantime, I would like to wish all my friends here in Paisley, in Scotland and across the globe, a safe and Happy Christmas! 

“Looking forward to seeing everyone here in Paisley next year!”

Buddie with letter

Provost's Community Awards 2021

paisley museum

Paisley Museum has received a £200,000 capital funding pledge of support from The Hugh Fraser Foundation towards its transformation into a world-class cultural destination, payable once the project is underway.

paisley museum

The Hugh Fraser Foundation, which is based in Glasgow, has for over 50 years supported a broad range of charities throughout Scotland. Dr Kenneth Chrystie, a Trustee of The Hugh Fraser Foundation said:

“We are very aware of the sterling efforts being made to transform and enhance the art and cultural attractions of Paisley. In this context, the museum’s initiative is hugely significant and when completed it will ensure the museum’s rightful place as a centre of excellence and a national treasure and attraction for many years to come. The Foundation was delighted to be able to offer support.”

The £42million redevelopment of the museum is part of Paisley’s radical regeneration plan, and the redesign of the campus led by an international team including architects AL_A and exhibition designers Opera Amsterdam, will allow the number of objects on display to be increased by 100%.

paisley museum

When Paisley Museum reopens it is expected to attract 125,000 visits each year and provide a £79million economic boost to the area over the next 30 years.

Few places of Paisley’s size have had such a global impact, and this is reflected in the museum’s internationally-significant holdings, which include an unrivalled collection of 1,200 Paisley shawls, rare 2nd century glass from Syria, and vast natural history collections. They are currently being held in Paisley: The Secret Collection, the only publicly-accessible museum store on a UK high street.

Councillor Lisa-Marie Hughes, Chair of Renfrewshire Leisure Ltd, said:

“Investing in our venues is key to our recovery from the pandemic as it will create jobs, support new and existing businesses in the area, and drive new footfall to our town centre.

“We are delighted the Hugh Fraser Foundation has pledged its support towards the redevelopment of Paisley Museum. The museum has been beloved by generations of Renfrewshire people and this brings us a step closer to realising our ambitions of radically transforming this prominent symbol of Paisley’s past for future generations.”

paisley museum

Eric Grounds, Capital Appeal Director of Paisley Reimagined, said:

“The pledge from The Hugh Fraser Foundation is yet another vote of confidence in the Paisley Museum project and indeed the town itself.

“Paisley Museum is an important part of the area’s heritage and has been at the heart of the community since it was founded in 1871. The £42million project to transform this historic venue will ensure our world-class collections are safeguarded and that our museum continues to be a place of knowledge, enjoyment and pride for those living in or visiting Paisley.”

Paisley Museum Reimagined is supported by Renfrewshire Council, the National Lottery Heritage Fund and the Scottish Government’s Regeneration Capital Grant Fund.

Janie seddon

Built in Paisley 1901 The Janie Seddon now rests in Motueka NZ. Janie began her career as a submarine mining vessel and was the last surviving military ship to have served in both world wars – rumour has it she even fired the first shot in WW2.

Janie sedon
Thanks to @SouthSeasBuddie Steve Irwin

 

You can find out lots more information about The Janie Seddon here.

Paisley town hall

PEOPLE are being given the chance to record their memories of Paisley Town Hall in a unique book that will be read by future generations.

Paisley town hall

Artist and filmmaker Kevin Cameron has been commissioned by Renfrewshire Leisure to create a book as part of a time capsule about the Town Hall.

Kevin has created a Facebook page and is urging people to post their memories of Paisley Town Hall that will be used as one of the chapters in the time capsule’s book.

The Paisley Town Hall Time Capsule is being created as part of the work to preserve the much-loved building’s place at the heart of the town by transforming the facilities on offer inside the Victorian landmark.

The time capsule will be placed under the floor of the North Minor Hall, within Paisley Town Hall.

Kevin explains: “I’d love to hear anyone who has a special memory of the Town Hall, whether it involved a dance, or concert held there, a first date, wedding, formal dinner, graduation or a special event.

“This is a fantastic opportunity for the people of Renfrewshire to become part of history and to share their memories with future generations and tell what the Town Hall means to them.”

Kevin, who is being supported in the project by Renfrewshire Leisure’s film producer, Richard Weeks, added: “The Town Hall is steeped in history and the popular culture of Paisley and Renfrewshire.

“Music star, Paolo Nutini was discovered by his first manager when he gave an impromptu performance on the Town Hall stage while hundreds of teenagers were waiting for Fame Academy TV show winner, David Sneddon to appear. It would be great to hear from people who were in the audience that day.

“And thousands of football fans turned up at the Town Hall to see the victorious St Mirren team arrived there on an open-topped bus when they won the Scottish Cup in 1987. I’m sure that memory remains with everyone who was there that day.”

Go to www.facebook.com/PTHTimeCapsule/ to post your memories of Paisley Town Hall and your story could end up being read by someone in the future.

Paisley town hall

The refurbishment of the Town Hall is one of the key projects within Renfrewshire Council’s £100 million investment in venues and infrastructure, as part of a wider plan to use the town’s unique heritage and cultural assets to transform its future.

That includes the transformation of Paisley Museum into a world-class visitor attraction showcasing the town’s internationally-significant collections and story, and a new Learning and Cultural Hub bringing library services to a formerly-vacant unit at the heart of Paisley High Street.

lapwing-lodge

Lapwing Lodge is the cradle of a million Scouting memories, but its very future is in serious doubt due to the Covid crisis.

lapwing-lodge

Tonight, West Region Scouts is launching an appeal to raise at least £25,000 to keep the iconic outdoor education and activity centre open until June 2021 when we hope activities will open again as normal.

A series of fundraising initiatives have started in a bid to keep the centre open.

Members of the Scouting family are being asked to consider giving a regular sum of money for a short period of time to keep Lapwing open.

Lapwing sits at the top of Gleniffer Braes in Paisley and has been used by tens of thousands of Scouts as well as community groups and businesses for decades. It boasts indoor accommodation and facilities as well as outdoor facilities such as the high ropes, climbing walls and water activities on Caplaw Dam.

In recent years the addition of “Hobbit Houses” has enhanced the centre along with the newly-opened Peesweep Hall indoor games area.

Iain McNair, District Commissioner for Paisley and District, is heading up the Lapwing Appeal on behalf of West Region.

He said: “Lapwing Lodge is firmly embedded in the culture and history of Scouting in Scotland and it has hosted countless adventures over the years.

“With the onset of Covid the centre closed at what would have been its busiest period of the year and the income stopped immediately. We have looked at all funding options, Government support and ways to cut costs but the harsh reality is that if we don’t raise £25,000, Lapwing Lodge will close its doors and a vital outdoor resource will be lost, perhaps forever.”

Members of the Scouting family are being asked to create a Standing Order of just £10 a month for nine months. If all our members did this the centre would be saved. However, we appreciate that these are difficult times for many people and that this may not be affordable for everyone. One-off fundraising initiatives will also be held over the next few months in a bid to make up the total. Gift Aid will be reclaimed on every donation and payment to boost the funds coming in.

“Lapwing is already open for restricted outdoor events, but it won’t be enough to save it,” Iain added.

“The hope is that by June 2021 the Covid crisis will be over and we can get back to relying on our income from the many Scouting and other groups who use the centre normally. We have an opportunity in West Region to show what this brilliant facility means to us and I hope as many people as possible do what they can to support it.”

If you are able to set up a Standing Order the following details should be used:

West Region Scout Council

Acc No: 00795500

Sort Code: 80-91-27

Ref: Lapwing Appeal

Renfrew Golf Club Pro Am August 1977

IT was the day huge crowds turned out at Renfrew Golf Club to catch a glimpse of famous celebrities playing in a charity tournament.

One of the famous faces teeing off was none other than 007 himself, Sean Connery, who was joined by other stars from the world of entertainment and sport for a round of golf on the local course.

Renfrew Golf Club Pro Am August 1977

Image of Henry Cooper, Sean Connery, Jimmy Tarbuck and woman unknown, at Renfrew Golf Club participating in a Saints and Sinners Pro-Am tournament in aid of the Variety Club

Now a film looking back on that special day is to premier on Renfrewshire Leisure’s online television channel Ren TV, at 7pm on Friday, September 25.

Created by local filmmaker, Paul Russell, the film, Watch The Birdie, captures the excitement of locals as they watched the golf tournament – in aid of the Variety Club of Great Britain – held in August 1977.

As well as Sean Connery, one-time British, Commonwealth and European boxing champion, Henry Cooper, along with TV stars Bruce Forsyth and Jimmy Tarbuck also played in the tournament, at the Renfrew golf course.

Paul revealed that the film was inspired by the hilarious responses to some pictures taken at the event by photographer Pete Degnan, which had been posted on the Renfrew REMO Facebook page, where Renfrew residents share memories of their town.

The photographs prompted a lot of discussion and humorous anecdotes being posted on the social media page.

The film features interviews with event organisers, those who caddied on the day; Norry Wilson of the popular Lost Glasgow social history blog and photographer, Pete Degnan, who travelled from Derby to take part.

Paul said: “Younger viewers might not get the significance, but to have Sean Connery, Henry Cooper, James Hunt, Bruce Forsyth and Jimmy Tarbuck, to name but a few coming to Renfrew, would be today’s equivalent of having Daniel Craig, Tyson Fury, Lewis Hamilton, and Ant and Dec all coming to play a round at Renfrew Golf Club. These were the big stars of the day.”

“Lockdown has been a tough shift in lots of ways for everybody, but these recent times have really gathered people together in a virtual sense, brought happier times into focus and helped us all get through it.”

“Pete Degnans photographs are a gift in this regard and it is in the conversations, anecdotes and memories his images prompt, in which the real magic occurs.

“Every community has something to be proud of, things which make it unique, and it can be a comfort to remember and talk about these, especially when it can seem like the chips are down and past certainties can no longer be taken for granted.”

Chairperson of Renfrewshire Leisure, Councillor Lisa-Marie Hughes said: “I can’t wait to watch this film.

“As well as bearing witness to part of Renfrew’s social history where the community came together for an extraordinary event, I’m sure the film will be very entertaining and bring a smile to the faces of everyone watching – especially those who remember the golf tournament and saw the stars coming out to play at Renfrew Golf Club.”

The film is a Future Paisley project, as part of a radical and wide-ranging programme of events, activities and investments using the town’s unique and internationally significant cultural stories to transform its future.

To see Watch The Birdie go to www.renfrewshireleisure.com/rentv/.

Renfrewshire Heritage Centre

Renfrewshire Leisure says safety is the priority with measures including appointment-only entry and use of face coverings to protect visitors and staff

Renfrewshire’s popular Heritage Centre is reopening amid a surge of interest among people keen to learn more about their family history and community’s past.

Renfrewshire Heritage Centre3

The restart of on-site services on Thursday, September 17th, marks another stage in recovery from the coronavirus lockdown by the Centre’s operator, leisure and cultural charity Renfrewshire Leisure.

All visitors will be strictly required to pre-book their attendance and wear face coverings as part of health and social distancing measures being put in place to protect them and members of staff. Bookings can be made from today (Thursday, September 10th).

The Heritage Centre, temporarily located at the Abbey Mill Business Centre on Seedhill Road in Paisley as the £42m transformation of Paisley Museum continues, boasts an impressive collection of items and information which charts the stories of the people and places of Renfrewshire, from the earliest of times to the present day.

Renfrewshire

Its staff have been putting their expertise to strong use digitally during lockdown, supporting people with online research into the likes of family history and stories of the past from across Renfrewshire and expect the carefully managed return of physical services to be busy.

Christine McLean, Heritage Manager at Renfrewshire Leisure, said: “We’re looking forward to welcoming people back, albeit in a different way to that in which we’re used to, and helping them to use the great resources available at the centre, complementing the support we’ve been providing online and over the phone since March. Some of our team have 30 or 40 years’ experience so are a fantastic source of information themselves, as well as the fascinating resources we have.

“We’ve found that walks and the sights seen along the way during lockdown have inspired people to learn more about the history of the towns and villages in which they live – their built and social heritage. Lots of them have been getting in-touch to find out more information, as have those who have been using the time to explore their family history.”

Renfrewshire Heritage Centre3

To ensure that people can carry out their research in a safe and secure environment, coronavirus mitigation measures include:

  • An appointment-only entrance system. Bookings must be arranged in advance by emailing heritage@renfrewshire.gov.uk or by calling 0141 618 5375.
  • The discussion of research requirements ahead of arrival. Entrance will not be allowed without proof of pre-booking. 
  • Specific table allocation. Tables will be two metres apart. The resources required will be placed on these tables prior to arrival. No further items can be added during the visit.
  • Hand hygiene measures which protect both people and the items in the centre’s collection.
  • The quarantining of resources for 72 hours after every use.

For more details on arrangements at the Heritage Centre – or how all other Renfrewshire Leisure services are affected by Covid-19 and the protection measures in place at each venue – go to www.renfrewshireleisure.com/coronavirus