Fault Lines is a reimagining of a fashion show, looking to show the boundaries between how we look and how we see other people. Two Destination Language have assembled a truly diverse cast in terms of age, ability and race, and will have them taking to the catwalk while audiences flick between audio channels silent-disco style, creating their own soundtrack. The channels move between audio description, pop bangers, colonial history, language exploration. No two people will get the same show.

Harry Harris – PR Assistant

Storytelling PR
07449348314
 

Two Destination Language present

FAULT LINES

A fashion show on the fracture of feminism and fabric.

Ride the wave – travel the catwalk.

Creating a catwalk experience like no other, award-winning theatre makers Two Destination Language present their most ambitious project yet as part of Edinburgh’s Manipulate Festival 2020.

Examining the ever blurring cultural lines between how we look and how we see each other, Fault Lines will bring five strong, brave and diverse femme performers together to share one stage, with each audience member choosing their own accompanying narrative.

It’s a cast that is diverse in background, diverse in colour, and diverse in ability. Audiences will meet Damyana Radeva, whose story was told so powerfully in Two Destination Language’s debut show Near Gone; Caroline Ryan, performer and award-winning BSL interpreter, who will be speaking her own script and her own dialogue throughout, privileging BSL and D/deaf audience members; Cindy Awor, a young actor who describes herself as “a Scot from Uganda,”; Welly O’Brien, a disabled dancer who performs without a prosthetic leg; Hannah Yahya Hassan, an autistic Scottish-Bahraini performer; and Rachel Glower, who performs in the show as well as stage manages, driving the cast on and ensuring they ride the catwalk.

The audience will experience the show as a kind of historical, political, musical silent disco. Using the Listen Everywhere app, every audience member will be able to navigate between six distinct channels at their own pace. This is the only show where you can flick between a playlist of guilty pleasures, a history of the domination of the English language, and personal narratives of otherness and belonging, each of these and more illuminating the flowing garments, breaking stilettos and killer looks sashaying down the runway.

This is a show that foregrounds the beauty in our differences. Under the experimental eyes of creative duo Alister Lownie and Katherina Radeva, Summerhall’s Old Lab will transform into an unorthodox runway for two world premiere performances with national tour dates to be announced later in the year.

Combining playfulness, movement and text, Fault Lines invites us to question our own assumptions in this powerful play of identity, equality and inequality in this time of tectonic shifts.  This is Susan Sontag meets America’s Next Top Model.

1 paisley centre entrance

A first-of-its kind study with radical ideas for how Paisley town centre could look in a decade has been published – and aims to start a conversation about what might be possible in the town.

The ‘Vision for Paisley Town Centre 2030’ is the result of a unique link-up between Renfrewshire Council, the Scottish Government and Scotland’s Town Partnership – and uses Paisley as a test case for a series of bold ideas imagining how empty retail space could be better used

1 paisley centre entrance

Aileen Campbell, Scotland’s Cabinet Secretary for Communities and Local Government, will officially unveil the report at an event in the town centre today.

The study – produced by Glasgow-based Threesixty Architecture – is based on the idea changes to the way people shop have left towns like Paisley with far more retail space than they need

The authors lay out a series of radical ideas for how the town could be rebalanced to better meet community need – bringing with it new life and footfall. Their suggestions include:

1 paisley centre entrance

– introducing hundreds of new town centre residents, including repurposing the Paisley Centre shopping centre into a new residential quarter with ground-floor retail;

– new ‘attractors’ such as a High Street cinema, or European-style food hall housing independent food and drink businesses;

– bolstering remaining retail by concentrating it back on to the High Street and street-fronts;

– new public spaces for outdoor activity, and new lanes and streets creating new views and routes to ‘hidden’ parts of the town centre

1 paisley centre entrance

– how key vacant historic buildings such as the Liberal Club, YMCA building and TA Building could be brought back into use;

– other ideas such as shared office spaces or makers’ spaces, a new hotel, and relocating parts of university and college campuses into the heart of the town centre;

Cabinet Secretary Aileen Campbell said: “This study represents another significant milestone in the regeneration of Paisley and is further evidence of the ambition and commitment of the local community and partners.

3 new Liberal Club (1)

“A huge opportunity now exists to use this collaborative vision to create more positive change in the town, as well as sharing learning which can benefit other town centres and communities across Scotland.

“The Scottish Government will continue to work in partnership with local government to support the regeneration of our towns and high streets.”

Renfrewshire Council leader Iain Nicolson said: “The way people shop has changed forever, and towns everywhere are seeing the same issues with empty retail space.

“We can’t turn the clock back but we can consider how we could change to attract new life and footfall in future – and that’s what Paisley is doing.

“It’s important to stress these are not concrete plans – they are a set of ideas designed to spark a conversation about what might be possible over the next decade.

6 YMCA cinema (1)

“Paisley town centre is already changing for the better – the number of new cafes and restaurants and new housing built in recent years shows it is recognised as a good place to live and invest.

“Current and future council investment will make Paisley even more attractive to the private sector, but change of the scale imagined by the Vision could not be achieved by the council alone – so we want to hear from developers who could make that next stage of the journey happen.”

The contents of the report build on work already happening to use Paisley’s unique cultural and heritage story to transform its future through the Future Paisley programme, which aims to build on the momentum created by the town’s bid to be UK City of Culture 2021.

That includes a £100m investment in the town’s venues and outdoor spaces, including turning Paisley Museum into a world-class destination for the town’s internationally-significant collections, which last week saw £3.8m of funding confirmed from the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

Paisley is already finding new uses for vacant High Street spaces – construction will start soon to bring a formerly-empty retail unit back into use as a new learning and cultural hub housing library services, for which the first images have just been revealed.

That will build on the success of Paisley: The Secret Collection – the UK’s first publicly-accessible High Street museum store, which opened in 2017 – showing Paisley’s ambitions to put culture at the heart of its future high street are already being realised.

The Paisley Vision was produced after gathering feedback from key local partners – including community groups, businesses, educational establishments and private developers.

The idea for a High Street cinema is already being taken forward by a local group – the Paisley Community Trust – who, with support from the council, are developing their own plans to convert an existing building for that purpose.

Gary Kerr, chair of the Paisley Community Trust, said: ““It’s exciting to see such a transformational and radical vision for Paisley’s future revealed. Paisley Community Trust fully back this new vision for Paisley and we congratulate Threesixty Architecture on producing a superb piece of work.

“It’s particularly encouraging to see cinema at the forefront of the vision. This completely aligns with our current plans to bring cinema back to the heart of our town.

“We believe a cinema by and for our community is a vital first step in realising the wider vision for regeneration in the town centre. It’s Project One if you like.

“We’ve been working behind the scenes on it for a while now and will reveal more details very soon. We also look forward to seeing the other concepts from the vision being explored and developed into regeneration projects of their own in the years ahead.”

Colette Cardosi, chair of town centre business improvement district Paisley First, added: “In recent years, Paisley has found itself firmly back on the map with fantastic events for visitors and a growing number of independent businesses.

“However, like many towns throughout the country, we need to continuously adapt and evolve and Paisley First welcomes collaboration on any long-term strategy for the future which can help bring in new investment and new footfall to local businesses in Paisley town centre.”

Phil Prentice, chief officer of Scotland’s Towns Partnership, added: “Paisley has a rich tapestry of heritage and culture, is steeped in industry and tradition, and has many major assets.

“We hope this exciting blueprint can create a high street fit for 21st century citizens and Paisley can become an exemplar for other large towns across Scotland.”

Alan Anthony, managing director of Threesixty Architecture, who authored the Vision, said: “This study shows a people-first approach that reconnects the whole community to their town centre.

“We have an unprecedented opportunity to rebalance our High Street back to a place with a rich mix of uses. As a lifelong Paisley Buddy, it’s exciting to think Paisley could lead the way on town centre regeneration in Scotland.”

The council now hopes to hear from developers who are interested in investing in Paisley – with one firm which has already done so believing a template for success already exists.

Brian Clark, managing director of Park Lane Developments, said: “We believe  Park Lane’s partnership with Renfrewshire Council on the regeneration of the former Arnotts department store has already shown the way for how the public and private sector can work together to transform a town centre site.

“That project has already delivered 67 completed private and social rented housing along with the welcome addition of the Pendulum restaurant. The final phase is just about to go for planning and will bring an additional 70  new homes.

“The site was derelict for 10 years and is now back in beneficial use bringing new residents and activity back into the town centre – and shows the potential that exists in Paisley as a place to live and invest.”

Residents and businesses have the chance to see and give their views on the Paisley Vision plans for themselves at a public exhibition open in POP (the former Post Office) in the town’s Piazza shopping centre – on Friday 24 (1 to 4.30pm), Saturday 25 (9.30am to 4.30pm) and Monday 27 January (9.30am to 3pm).

The full report can also be viewed online at www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/paisleyvision, along with a Q&A which goes into more details on the ideas it contains and what happens next.

single cover

Lisa has a lot happening in January before she heads off to Holland leave us in peace for a few months.

Her new single No More Time comes out on 31 January, followed shortly after by a video for the song and there is a single launch gig in Paisley at CC’s on 31 January.

lisa and new guitar

The video was funded by a grant from Creative Scotland Time to Shine.

As well as her single launch, its a send off, the last gig in UK until August and an early birthday party as she will be in Holland by time she is 20 on 6th February.

Im obviously keen to get as much attention for it as possible, especially as it has taken her a year to get to a place where she was ready to launch new music to the big bad world. I dont have the final copy of the video yet but will be happy to share it with you and a link to the single once its live.

Its not the Chef funded Paisley song but one she wrote a while back. She is also setting herself the challenge of writing and producing the Paisley song before she heads off. We might get a draft of it at the gig at CCs, Im not sure though.

electric warehouse

No More Time was written about 2 years ago but its release was delayed by Lisa’s mental health break earlier this year. The song is about one of the experiences that contributed to her depression, a very toxic relationship which she took her time to extricate herself from. Its positive though as its celebrating finally being able to make the break.

single cover

Its very unlike her previous material.  Lisa’s first time playing electric guitar on a track and she also produced a lot of it herself which was a major challenge at times but turned out well in the end.

Visit and Like Lisa’s Facebook page to keep informed about upcoming gigs/

PAC Guide Launch

THE world premiere of John Byrne’s new play, Underwood Lane is one of the highlights of a packed programme of music, theatre, comedy, dance and literature coming to Renfrewshire in the next few months.

PAC Guide Launch

The musical play set in Paisley tells the story of a young skiffle band trying to make the big time.

Artist and playwright, Byrne has written Underwood Lane in memory of his close friend and fellow Buddie, singer-songwriter Gerry Rafferty who died nine years ago this month.

PAC Guide Launch

Byrne is one of Scotland’s most talented artists and writers and is best known for his paintings, theatrical masterpieces like The Slab Boys Trilogy and the hit TV shows, Tutti Frutti and Your Cheatin’ Heart.

The play – a co-production from Renfrewshire Leisure and Glasgow’s Tron Theatre – is being premiered at Paisley Arts Centre between Thursday, June 25 and Sunday, June 28. This will be the last show at Paisley Arts Centre before it closes for refurbishment this summer.

PAC Guide Launch

More information about the Underwood Road performances and a host of other events, shows and performances being staged in Renfrewshire are featured in the recently-published What’s On booklet, The Guide for Spring 2020.

The Guide – available to download from www.renfrewshireleisure.com or picked up from all Renfrewshire Leisure sports facilities and venues – details how there is something for everyone when it comes to entertainment, events and stimulating talks and classes at local venues.

There is a strong programme for families including The Shark in the Park Musical show, based on the popular Nick Sharratt’s children’s books, which is being staged at Johnstone Town Hall, on Wednesday February 26.

Children and adults will also be able to enjoy the Easter Fun Day with circus-themed activities along with arts and crafts, at Johnstone Town Hall, on Saturday, April 11.

A not-to-be-missed theatre performance from Arabella Weir, star of TV’s The Fast Show and Two Doors Down, is at Paisley Arts Centre, on Friday, March 27. A best-selling author and actor, Arabella’s show is called Does My Mum Loom Big In This? as she takes to the stage to describe some hilarious anecdotes from her dysfunctional childhood.

Traditional Celtic music at its best can be heard when The Tannahill Weavers play Paisley Arts Centre on Saturday, February 15. And the Scottish Alternative Music Awards return to Paisley Arts Centre for the third year, on Friday and Saturday, March 13 and 14.

For the first time a Paisley Book Festival is being held at various venues between Thursday, February 20 and Saturday, February 29 with the central theme of Radical Voices and Rebel Stories.

Chairperson of Renfrewshire Leisure, Councillor Lisa-Marie Hughes said: “We have a wonderful array of entertainment and events planned for the next few months.

“We’re really excited about the world premiere of John Byrne’s Underwood Lane, which is a play written by a Paisley Buddie, about Paisley and being performed for the first time in Paisley. I’m sure the shows will be a sell-out.

“There’s definitely something for everyone in the latest issue of The Guide whether its music, theatre, dance, children’s entertainment or literature that people enjoy.”

YSOC

A survey has been launched seeking the views of Paisley town centre residents and visitors following a six-week intervention designed to build safer and stronger communities.

Link: socsi.in/Follow_up_survey_for_Paisley_town_centre_7fejpsocsi.in/Follow_up_survey_for_Paisley_town_centre_7fejp

YSOC

Led by Police Scotland, the Your Home, Your Street, Our Community programme is supported by Renfrewshire Council, Engage Renfrewshire, the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service, Renfrewshire Leisure and the Renfrewshire Health and Social Care Partnership, alongside Paisley First, and sets out to tackle the issues that matter to local residents.

Police at Paisley Abbey

A survey was carried out inviting local people and businesses to have their say on how to make Paisley town centre safer and an action plan was devised to tackle the main issues.

This was the first time that the initiative had tackled a town centre which brought fresh challenges for the working group having previously worked in wider community areas.

It addressed perceived problems including antisocial behaviour, drug offences and night-time safety, with actions such as additional police and warden patrols, mobile CCTV, taxi marshalling at weekends and enforcement action to tackle illegal parking.

Detective Chief Inspector Douglas Falconer, Renfrewshire & Inverclyde Division said: “The Paisley town centre initiative is an excellent example of how partnership working can benefit the entire community.

“We listened to what the people of Paisley have raised as their main issues to date and over the past few weeks have addressed many of those concerns.

“We have provided high visibility patrols to reassure and offer advice and guidance to local residents around specific issues such as personal safety and antisocial behaviour.

“We would encourage anyone living or visiting Paisley town centre to continue to let us know of any concerns they have, in order that we help make Paisley town centre a safer place for all.”

Paisley town centre is the latest area to benefit from the programme following successful interventions in Shortroods, Erskine, Ferguslie and Gallowhill, where the work carried out noted a significant decrease in the issues initially identified by residents in those areas.

Councillor Marie McGurk, Convener of Renfrewshire Council’s Communities, Housing and Planning Policy Board, said: “This campaign has made a fantastic difference in a number of communities in Renfrewshire which had been facing issues affecting the safety of people in the area – and Paisley town centre was the latest.

“All the partners involved in the project worked hard to listen to what local people told us were the main issues and implemented actions to make a difference.

“We’ve seen a visible change in to the town centre, but we want to know what local people think as we evaluate the campaign and plan our ongoing support to maintain any improvements.

“Please fill out the survey and let us know how you thought the campaign went and what Paisley town centre is like today.”

Anyone can take part in the survey, which closes at midnight on Sunday 26 January, at www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/YourHomeYourStreet.

Paisley Museum

Plans to completely transform Paisley Museum into a world-class visitor destination telling the town’s unique stories including that of the globally admired, Paisley pattern, have taken a major step forward as The National Lottery Heritage Fund today announced £3.83million support for the project.

Paisley Museum

The four buildings which make up Scotland’s first municipal museum, including the country’s first public observatory, will be ambitiously re-designed and extended by an award-winning international team, including  the architects AL_A and exhibition designers Opera Amsterdam, to create an exciting new experience for visitors.

Paisley Museum

The new, contemporary galleries and exhibitions will double the number of objects on display and be fully accessible so that visitors can explore the town’s rich heritage and its part in the story of the famous teardrop Paisley pattern textile, from the shawls of Kashmir to the haute couture of rock stars. Inspiring learning zones, improved social spaces, a new cafe, shop and cloakroom facilities will add to the Museum’s appeal, as will a new, welcoming entrance surrounded by a courtyard and gardens.

Paisley Museum

The revamped museum is forecast to attract 125,000 visits a year, almost four times the current numbers, and create a £79m economic boost over 30 years. It is the cornerstone of Renfrewshire Council’s vision to bring new life to the town through investment in heritage and culture. This has included the opening of the UK’s first publicly accessible high street museum store, Paisley: The Secret Collection,  and the conservation and repair of key buildings which make up the town’s historic core through a scheme funded with £2m from the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

Commenting on today’s announcement, Caroline Clark, Director Scotland of The National Lottery Heritage Fund, said:

“This project has been driven by the passion of the Paisley community to put their unique heritage on an international stage. With the help of National Lottery funding, new life will be breathed into these heritage buildings giving Paisley’s wonderful textiles and other treasures the prominence they deserve, while also bringing a new confidence to the town.”

Councillor Lisa-Marie Hughes, Chair of Renfrewshire Leisure Ltd, said: “We want to thank everyone connected to the National Lottery Heritage Fund for their fantastic support.

“It will help us deliver a world-class museum which will take the town’s unique and fascinating stories to new audiences, showcase Paisley’s internationally-significant collections, and bring new life and footfall to the wider area.

“It will create a new accessible hub at the heart of life in the town for the local community – local groups are already co-producing the incredible stories which will populate the reopened museum, and we look forward to continuing to work with The National Lottery Heritage Fund and others over the years ahead to deliver on that.”

The new museum is expected to open in 2022.

Industry & Management 4.0 Eventbrite 2160x1080px v2

EVENT INVITATION

Industry & Management 4.0

What does that mean for you?

 

Thursday 6 February, Abercorn Building, Paisley

Industry & Management 4.0 Eventbrite 2160x1080px v2

Have you thought about what good management will look like in the future?

Are you making best use of your people and systems?

Is your team operating at optimum performance?

At West College Scotland we provide solutions to those questions through project-driven management and leadership training programmes to support you to tackle your business challenges and prepare for change.

Our training packages provide immediate impact for managers, leaders and the organisation.

Join us at our business breakfast on Thursday 6 February at 8am to find out more!

To register visit: http://bit.ly/30gLY1B

SOBS Memorial tree

Renfrewshire’s annual memorial service to commemorate those who have lost their lives to suicide will be held in Paisley later this month.

A short service will take place on Thursday 23 January at Renfrewshire House, hosted by support group Survivors of Bereavement by Suicide (SOBS).

SOBS Memorial tree

SOBS Memorial tree 25.1.18

The service is open to all and anyone who has been affected by suicide is invited to meet in the Marriage Suite from 3:10pm to collect a commemorative purple heart on which they can write a message to a loved one, if desired.

At 3:30pm there will be a short set of readings followed by a procession to the memorial tree where Renfrewshire’s Provost Lorraine Cameron will light the tree.

After the service, all those in attendance are invited to join the Provost, the local SOBS support group and the Choose Life team for light refreshments in Paisley Abbey.

The memorial tree was first dedicated in 2010 as a permanent memorial to those who have died through suicide and is believed to have been the first of its kind in Scotland.

SOBS Memorial tree

SOBS Memorial tree 25.1.18

The service aims to provide an opportunity to remember those who have been lost while providing an arm of support to the survivors. It is an opportunity to connect with others who have faced similar situations.

Provost Cameron, who helped establish the tree, said: “Over the past ten years this service has become extremely important to members of the local community and I’m honoured to be involved.

“Suicide is still very much a taboo subject, but the Choose Life and SOBS team will be available after the service to provide any support you, or a friend or family member, may need, and I would encourage anyone who has been affected by suicide in any manner to come along.

“If you’re unable to make it along, please get in touch with the team to talk about how you are feeling or what support you need. Someone is always there to listen.”

Anyone unable to attend the service who wishes a message to be placed onto the tree can get in touch in advance or can visit the council reception at any time following the service to collect a commemorative heart.

If you are feeling suicidal, or you know someone that might be then please call one of the helpline numbers: Samaritan’s 116 123, Breathing Space 0800 83 85 87, RAMH First Crisis 0141 849 90 90 or 0500 829 093

For more information contact the Choose Life Team on 0141 849 2200 or visit www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/sobs.

Paisley Halloween Festival

Paisley’s popular Halloween and Spree 2019 festivals delivered a £1.2million economic boost to Renfrewshire.

That’s according to the findings of independent assessments into the two October events, which also showed record numbers of people attended the festivals in 2019.

Paisley Halloween Festival

One of the largest events of its kind in the UK, the Dark Circus themed Paisley Halloween Festival attracted 41,000 people across the two-days – up 17% on 2018. The event was delivered alongside internationally-acclaimed outdoor theatre specialists, Cirque Bijou.

More than 350 costumed performers and community groups took part in the Mardi Gras style parade, the centrepiece of the festival, which wound its way through the town centre. The parade also featured fantastic, giant lion and elephant floats, ferocious fire performers, creepy clowns and curious creatures, to delight the gathered crowds.

Gerry Rafferty Song Book

Twenty six percent of attendees to the Halloween festival were from outside Renfrewshire demonstrating the popularity and stellar programme of the free, family-friendly activities on offer.

The Paisley Halloween Festival was awarded £16,950 of National Programme funding from EventScotland for the 2019 event.

Brickz4kids

The festival delivered £824,250 to the local economy with local businesses benefiting from the high number of visitors in the town that weekend.

Paisley Halloween Festival scooped the Best Cultural Event or Festival at the 2019/20 Scottish Thistle Awards West Scotland regional finals and will now go on to compete in the prestigious national final on March 5, 2020.

Glasvagas

The Spree also delivered impressive results for the area. More than 12,000 festival-goers turned out to enjoy the diverse range of acts in the stunning Salon Perdu Spiegeltent in Paisley’s County Square – allowing for more people to enjoy the performances.

The numbers also add up, with a £411,000 total economic boost from the 10-day music, arts and cultural festival.

Paisley Halloween Festival

The Spree 2019 saw record ticket sales with music and comedy fans being treated to sell-out shows from Hue and Cry, Glasvegas, The Snuts, Jerry Sadowitz and spectacular performances from Soul legend PP Arnold, Hayseed Dixie, Super Furry Animals frontman Gruff Rhys, Karine Polwart’s Scottish Songbook and two Friday comedy nights compered by Fred MacAulay and Scott Gibson.

The festival was programmed by Regular Music and sponsored by Tennent’s Lager.

There was also a packed Wee Spree programme for kids during the school holidays with 2,822 people heading along to enjoy the events – the highest number of attendees on record for the event.

The festival also provided a boost to local traders with many festival-goers choosing to Spend Local and sample the great bars, restaurants and cafes in the area.

Jacqueline McCaig, owner of The Old Swan Inn which hosted the Spree Festival Club of daily events during the festival, said: “We absolutely loved hosting the Spree Festival Club at The Old Swan – it was a fantastic week of live music. The pub was really busy with a great atmosphere and a great mix of customers old and new, who came to see what the Festival Club was all about and enjoy the variety of talent we had on show.”

Renfrewshire Council Leader Iain Nicolson said: “It was phenomenal to see such great numbers coming along to Paisley’s Halloween Festival and to Spree and now this report shows the positive impact these major events have on the local economy and local businesses.

“We’re continuing to work with partners to offer a fantastic calendar of events to attract residents and visitors from across Scotland and the rest of the UK.

“Renfrewshire has so much to offer and major events are an important part of our plans to use our culture and heritage to drive footfall and cement our status as one of Scotland’s top visitor destination.”

advice works

Residents who have splurged the cash at Christmas are being urged to seek confidential money advice ahead of the January bills coming in.

advice works

Renfrewshire Council launch Universal Credit advice in Johnstone and Ferguslie 18.9.18

Advice Works is a free, confidential and independent service funded by Renfrewshire Council that gives residents advice in a straightforward manner.

They run a drop-in service during office hours on Mondays through to Fridays at Johnstone Town Hall and at the customer service centre at Renfrewshire House.

Further drop-in sessions are also available at Renfrew Health Centre on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays between 8.45am and 11.00am.

The team can help with a wide range of money and debt advice issues including budgeting, negotiating with creditors, bankruptcy, mortgage and rent arrears, checking you are getting all the benefits you are entitled to, help with forms, and lots more.

Appointments can also be made to speak to an adviser about welfare rights, benefits or debts by calling 0300 300 1238 during office hours.

Finance and Resources Convener, Councillor John Shaw, said: “Getting advice ahead of January bills coming in is vital and I encourage all residents who feel they may struggle to pay the bills when they come in to get advice now.

“Advice Works, Advice Renfrewshire and Renfrewshire Citizen’s Advice Bureau can all help residents who need money advice right now.

“Residents should avoid high-cost and pay-day loans as they only lose more money in the high-cost interest they need to pay back. Cheaper credit, such as a loan from a credit union, is a much more affordable way to manage your money.”

Advice Renfrewshire is a one-stop-shop website that links residents with the appropriate organisation to help with their issues. Their dedicated freephone helpline – 0808 164 2922 – is managed by Renfrewshire Citizen’s Advice Bureau.

To find out more about credit unions in Renfrewshire, visit http://mycreditunionrenfrewshire.co.uk.

To contact Advice Works, phone 0300 300 1238 or visit www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/adviceworks.

For the Advice Renfrewshire website, visit http://advicerenfrewshire.org.

Advice Works

Advice Works is open Monday to Thursday between 8.45am and 4.45pm and Friday between 8.45am and 3.55pm.

The drop-in service is available at:

Advice Works, Johnstone Town Hall, 25 Church Street, Johnstone -Monday – Thursday: 8.45am – 4.45pm, and Friday 8.45am – 3.55pm

Customer Service Centre, Renfrewshire House, Cotton Street, Paisley – Monday – Thursday: 8.45am – 4.45pm, and Friday 8.45am – 3.55pm

Renfrew Health Centre, 10 Ferry Road, Renfrew – Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays: 8.45am – 11.00am