Mirren

A bright third floor 395 sqft office located at Mirren Court Three available to let now!

This modern office has LED lighting, central heating and lots of natural day light. The office has a large shared break out / tea prep area. The space is perfect for 3/4 people.

Meeting room hire is also available.

Please contact us on 0141 843 4211 to get more details!

paisley pirates

Paisley Pirates, fresh from three wins on the trot in the Scottish National League, face one of their most daunting tasks so far as they head for Edinburgh this Sunday to take on the Murrayfield Racers (face off 6.00pm). The side from the capital has so far inflicted three heavy defeats on the Pirates, who are hoping that their recent winning streak will stand them in good stead against a side which has so far proved to have had the Indian sign over them in league and cup matches. Murrayfield have seldom been troubled in the  SNL so far this season, but suffered a rare 5-4 reverse to Solway Sharks, the other blockbusting side in the league this year on Saturday, although they did go to Aberdeen and record a 4-0 shut out victory on the Sunday.

paisley pirates

Pirates, on the other hand, have steadily climbed up the league table in recent weeks, their three wins from three matches in actual fact netting them eight points, as with matches against Belfast Giants SNL counting for double points, their 13-4 win against the Irish side last Sunday netted them four vital league points in their quest for an end of season playoff place, where they hope to successfully defend their title.

Pirates return to home league action the following Sunday (9 February) when they take on local rivals North Ayrshire Wild (face off 4.30pm).

flightpath

FlightPath Fund award will see pupils from seven schools take part in the Engineering Development Trust’s Go4SET programme –

Pupils from seven local secondary schools will take part in a national Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) competition thanks to a £7000 award from Glasgow Airport’s FlightPath Fund.

flightpath

The project, run by the Engineering Development Trust (EDT), sees teams of six S2 pupils participate in the 10-week regional Go4SET programme. During this time, they will work with a company mentor to produce a report, model and a five-minute presentation on one of three STEM-related projects focusing on sustainability and the environment – Fit for the Future, Smart Surroundings and Future Proof or Designing Building for Climate Change.

As part of the project, the pupils will also take part in a site visit to their mentor’s company to see STEM application in the workplace. 

Go4SET gives the pupils the opportunity to develop skills, inform subject choice and change perceptions about STEM by raising awareness of how studying these subjects can lead to a rewarding career. The pupils taking part in the Go4SET programme will gain an SQA Steps to Work Award SCQF Level 4 and a Bronze Industrial Cadet Award.

Support from the airport’s FlightPath Fund has ensured that 42 S2 pupils from the following secondary schools in Renfrewshire, Glasgow, East and West Dunbartonshire participate in Go4SET:

Bearsden Academy Gleniffer High School

Trinity High School Turnbull High School

St Peter the Apostle High School Clydebank High School

Drumchapel High School

 

Archie Hunter, Chair of the FlightPath Fund, said: “Our science, engineering and technology sectors face significant challenges in terms of skills and people shortages. 

 

“STEM-sector related employment in Scotland is set to grow by 4% by 2027, so projects such as Go4SET are absolutely vital in ensuring these challenges can be met. 

 

“The FlightPath Fund focuses its community investment in a number of areas including education, the environment and employment. Go4SET ticks each of these boxes and the £7000 award from the Fund will ensure that the pupils from the chosen secondary schools in our local communities gain an insight to the exciting STEM-related career opportunities that are out there.”

   

Research has shown that the exposure of younger age groups to STEM related employers, encourages more students to choose post-16 courses in these subject areas, eventually leading to the study of STEM degrees at university. 

A regional section of the Go4SET programme was launched today (Thursday, January 23) at the University of the West of Scotland campus in Paisley. 

Flora Lewis-Gotts, Partnership Manager for Scotland at EDT, said: “We are delighted that the Glasgow Airport FlightPath Fund committee has chosen to support the EDT Go4SET programme this year. 

 

“The programme got underway today with a launch event at the University of West of Scotland, Paisley, where the students met their sponsor and company mentor who will guide them through the project and take them on a site visit.

 

“We are looking forward to welcoming the students back to UWS in May for the Celebration and Assessment Day, when one team will be crowned regional winner and go through to the National Final at the Glasgow Science Centre in June.”

 

In 2019, the FlightPath Fund award more than £110,000 to over 70 local clubs, community groups and charities. This amount was also boosted by a record £20,000 donated by Glasgow Airport passengers via six currency collection globes based in the terminal.  

To find out more about applying for funding support, visit: www.glasgowairport.com/community,

Dublin Stobart

Additional Monday to Friday flight will bring extra 26,000 seats 

 

Glasgow Airport passengers travelling to and from Dublin will enjoy even more choice following Aer Lingus Regional’s decision to introduce an extra weekday flight this April.

Dublin Stobart

The move will see services operated by the Irish carrier increase from five to six flights Monday to Friday and boost capacity by an additional 26,000 seats. 

Operated by Aer Lingus Regional franchise partner Stobart Air, the Dublin service is popular with leisure and business passengers travelling between Glasgow and the Republic of Ireland’s capital city. The additional service has been timed to compliment onward connections to popular North American destinations including New York, Boston and Chicago.

The additional Monday to Friday flight times are as follows:

 

  • Dublin-Glasgow  
    • Departs DUB 0735
    • Arrives GLA 0855

 

  • Glasgow-Dublin 
    • Departs GLA 0930
    • Arrives DUB 1050

  

Glasgow Airport’s head of aviation Paul White said: “The additional week-day flight brings a 17% increase on what is a hugely-popular service. This is tremendous news for passengers travelling between both Glasgow and Dublin, whether it is for business purposes or to enjoy a city break in each destination. 

“The addition of this service also guarantees greater choice and flexibility for passengers making onward connections to a number of North American destinations from Dublin.

“The Republic of Ireland’s capital city remains one of our busiest routes with more than 170,000 passengers making the short trip across the Irish Sea via Aer Lingus in 2019. Likewise, Glasgow continues to be a very popular destination for Irish visitors, so this latest announcement is welcome news indeed.”

A spokesperson at Stobart Air said: “Stobart Air is pleased to increase capacity on the Glasgow-Dublin Aer Lingus regional route. Aer Lingus Regional’s Glasgow to Dublin service has proven extremely popular with both business and leisure travellers, and 2019 represented the fourth consecutive year of growth on the route. 

“The increase in frequency is a direct reflection of customer demand and is in keeping with the strong performance of our extensive route network connecting Scotland and Ireland.  We are therefore very pleased to be able to offer our customers greater choice and convenience on the route and to build on our great relationship with Glasgow Airport.”   

The additional flights start on Monday 6 April and are on sale now. Visit www.aerlingus.com for more information.

council logo

Renfrewshire Council has reiterated its green credentials as it outlines climate change as an immediate priority, with its Climate Emergency Working Group set to meet tomorrow (Thursday).

council logo

In June 2019, there was cross-party support for a council motion which declared a climate emergency and a working group has been set up with members of all political parties, who will make recommendations on how to make Renfrewshire carbon neutral by 2030.

The area has a strong base to work from as since 2012/13, Renfrewshire has reduced its carbon emissions by 55.7%, far exceeding its 36% target, and it has been carrying out numerous projects to make the area greener.

A new recycling system has seen the area’s recycling rate increase every quarter throughout 2019, with the latest figures showing 55.42% of waste was recycled between July and September 2019, and this is further supported by the commencement of the Clyde Valley Residual Waste Project which now sees at least 90% of non-recyclable waste turned into energy rather than going to landfill.

A transformation of the street lighting in Renfrewshire has reduced energy and carbon consumption by 64%, contributing an 8% reduction in the council’s overall emissions, while there will shortly be 100 electric vehicles in the council’s fleet as part of a commitment to replace any vehicles with electric versions wherever possible.

Since 2013, the council has secured more than £15million in funding for improvements in home energy efficiency. More than 6000 homes have benefited so far and carbon emissions have reduced by 108,000 tonnes – the equivalent of removing 21,000 cars from the roads.

Recently, the council was awarded £1.8million by the UK Government to turn 75 properties into low energy or EnerPHit homes, which are low energy buildings that require very little energy to heat or cool and could see annual energy bills reduced to £150 for residents.

The council also takes a positive and ambitious approach to biodiversity conservation and promotion and its 2018-2022 Action Plan is working to protect and enhance natural habitats in Renfrewshire as part of its climate change actions.

Renfrewshire Council Leader Iain Nicolson said: “As a council, we are striving to reduce our emissions wherever possible as we recognise the immediate threat that climate change poses to our environment.

“We are making great progress in reducing our carbon output, far exceeding our target of 36% by March 2020, and we have undertaken numerous successful projects which are making a real difference to our local environment.

“However, we know we can do more, and this working group will endeavour to identify all areas where we can make a difference – be it immediately or when setting out how to undertake future projects.

“We recognise that the council needs to lead from the front in Renfrewshire and we’re committed to being the driving force that inspires our businesses and residents to follow suit.”

The group next meet on Thursday 23 January and will set out their goals and aspirations for the year ahead.

Proposed front elevation

An innovative housing project in Renfrewshire will help to tackle climate change and could slash tenant’s annual heating bills to £150.

Proposed front elevation

Renfrewshire Council’s housing investment team has been given the green light to deliver a £4.5million retrofit of 75 terraced council houses.

The popular 1960s-built Paisley crosswall construction properties are being given a retrofit to reduce their carbon emissions and improve their energy efficiency.

Together with experts John Gilbert Architects, the Council team has developed a specialist, cost-effective package of works to radically reduce the amount of fuel being burned.

The completed works could enable carbon dioxide emissions to drop by almost 100 tonnes per property over the next 25 years, collectively preventing 7400 tonnes of Carbon Dioxide entering the environment.

And each property’s energy efficiency could rise from Band D to Band B, the second highest Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) rating, bringing the 60-year-old houses in line with most newbuild properties.

Councillor Marie McGurk, Convener of Renfrewshire Council’s Communities, Housing and Planning Board, said: “These houses are very popular with tenants as they have a front and back door, but unfortunately they weren’t built to meet modern energy efficiency standards.

“We’re very excited about this project which will improve the warmth and comfort levels for our tenants and ensure better ventilation all without the need for them to decant from their home, while at the same time tackling fuel poverty and making a critical contribution towards Renfrewshire being carbon neutral by 2030.

“Everyone should have homes to be proud of and this project will not only greatly improve the quality of Renfrewshire’s housing stock, but has the potential to be scaled up and adapted to fit other types of houses, becoming the blueprint to meet the highest energy efficiency standards.”

Renfrewshire councillors have approved the project plans and consultation will now get underway with tenants before work is scheduled to start this summer, taking around 18-months to complete.

An Energy Performance Survey will benchmark each home’s efficiency before the works start. New external wall insulation, roofing, solar panels, windows, external doors and underfloor insulation are all included, with off-site construction enabling the process at each home to be streamlined to take around 4-6 weeks.

The completed works will achieve the EnerPHit standard, one of the highest energy standards in the UK for an energy performance retrofit.

Lori McElroy, Director of Housing and Energy (Scotland) at the Building Research Establishment, said: “We’re pleased to help with the planning behind this project, which is taking innovative thinking to the next stage by demonstrating a clear solution to a complex issue. We are committed to supporting organisations to deliver the Scottish Government’s Energy Efficient Scotland targets and look forward to measuring and monitoring the project to ensure the best possible outcomes.”

Sarah Buchanan, Innovation Manager, Construction Scotland Innovation Centre, said: “We are delighted to be working with Renfrewshire Council and other partners on this innovative project which will bring positive change to the lives of the tenants whilst also creating economic development for Scotland and of course improving carbon emissions. There are an estimated 250,000 crosswall properties across the UK and this pilot project creates an affordable solution for housing stock which can be rolled out at scale.”

The project is part-funded through £1.8million secured from the UK Government Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Whole House Retrofit competition.

Primary - Heriot - HT, DHT and P2, P5 and P6 pupils - 17 Jan 2020 - JCON (23)

Pupils and teachers at two Paisley schools were over the moon to find out their latest positive inspection results.

Primary - Heriot - HT, DHT and P2, P5 and P6 pupils - 17 Jan 2020 - JCON (23)

Heriot Primary School and Mary Russell School received high praise by Education Scotland for their schools’ progress on improving attainment for children and young people.

Heriot primary was praised for the headteacher’s leadership within the school and the teachers’ creative approaches to learning numeracy and mathematics.

The positive, supportive and inclusive culture within Mary Russell was noted as making for confident children and young people who are achieving a range of national qualifications and wider awards.

Pupils talked positively about their schools, particularly on how they are benefitting from their schools’ ethos.

One pupil at Mary Russell said: “This school is a community and a family. I get lots of support.”

Another pupil added: “We get lots of support to help us decide what to study at college, or what job we want to get. We have visitors who come in and talk to us about our future options.”

At Heriot primary, pupils spoke of their love of maths.

One pupil said: “My favourite subject is maths. It gets your brain going and the teachers give us a challenge, which is fun.”

Another pupil added: “We use the blueprint boards, pictures and materials, like cereal and playdough, to learn maths.”

Hilary Paterson, Headteacher of Heriot primary, added: “I’m incredibly proud to be the Headteacher of Heriot Primary School and our very positive inspection report reflects the dedication and commitment of our staff team.

“Together we continually strive to improve our practice to better support our children and community and improve outcomes for all. We are delighted that our inspection team identified how highly-motivated, engaged and confident our children are due to the nurturing and creative approaches we use at Heriot.”

Headteacher of Mary Russell School, Julie McCallum, said: “We are delighted with the outcomes of the report and especially pleased that inspectors recognised the strong, positive ethos and inclusive culture in our school which is built on our school values.

“Our approaches to wellbeing are improving outcomes for our learners and are leading to positive and sustained destinations for our young people on leaving school.

“Our thanks go to everyone who is involved in the work of our school, our pupils, staff, parents and partners to ensure we continue to deliver high quality outcomes for children and young people with additional support needs.

“Our whole learning community is very proud of what we have achieved and is testament to our school motto of Be All We Can Be! Be Proud of Who We Are!”

To view the inspection reports, visit https://education.gov.scot/education-scotland.

laugh 1

VISITORS to a shopping centre were yesterday (Monday, January 20) given an unusual antidote to Blue Monday – the chance to take part in laughter yoga sessions.

laugh 1

The team at intu Braehead organised the laughter yoga in a bid to help people feel good in a day that is described as the most depressing of the year.

The relatively new concept in mind and body exercise teaches people how to laugh without relying on jokes or humour.

It was developed in Mumbai, India by a Dr Madan Kataria, in the mid-1990s and laughter yoga provides similar physiological and psychological benefits as spontaneous laughing.

The special laughter yoga sessions are part of a unique programme of activities at intu Braehead aimed at getting folks smiling again during the January – which can be a time when some people feel down after the festive celebrations.

Marketing manager for intu Braehead, David Lyon said: “Everyone likes a good laugh and it’s a great way to lift your spirits.

“We decided to bring in some laughter yoga instructors and I’m sure people taking part will leave intu Braehead with a smile on their face.”

Along with the laughter yoga sessions, David has listed other things to do at the shopping centre and in Soar at intu Braehead to beat the January blues.

They include ice skating; trampolining; indoor adventure golf; having a go on the Big Slide – the UK’s tallest helter-skelter; catching a movie at the Odeon cinema; ten-pin bowling; watching a Glasgow Clan ice hockey match; indulge yourself in The Little Dessert Shop, or simply spend quality time with family and friends in one of their many cafes, restaurants and bars.

Partners at the Bargeddie plant

A unique new contract will see a minimum of 90% of Renfrewshire’s waste transformed into energy as the area meets the Scottish Government’s landfill ban.

Partners at the Bargeddie plant

The £700 million, 25-year Clyde Valley Residual Waste Project between East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, North Ayrshire, North Lanarkshire and Renfrewshire Council and Viridor is now underway and will serve almost one-sixth of Scotland’s population.

It will see up to 190,000 tonnes of general waste diverted from landfill and converted to low-carbon energy and is expected provide a net saving of almost 50,000 tonnes of CO2e every year.

It will also deliver a guaranteed minimum increase in recycling for Renfrewshire, further enhancing the area’s growing environmental prospects having seen its recycling rate improve every quarter since December 2018.

Councillor Cathy McEwan, Convener of Renfrewshire Council’s Infrastructure, Land and Environment Policy Board, said: “A key priority of the council is tackling climate change and this project will make a significant difference to the level of C02 we produce by improving the way we deal with our waste.

“Anything that cannot be recycled will now no longer go to landfill and will be transformed into energy instead, making a real difference to our environment and taking our commitment to recycling to a new level.

“Our teams have been working hard over the last decade to make this a reality and we’re looking forward to working with our partnership authorities to ensure that the project achieves the environmental aims it sets out.”

This is the first partnership of its kind in Scotland and will see household waste taken from Renfrewshire and the other local authorities to a Materials Recovery Facility, where it will be further separated to remove recyclable materials before it is treated to produce a refuse derived fuel.

Then, at the brand-new Energy Recover Facility at Dunbar, it is burned at high temperatures, under carefully controlled conditions to produce 258GWh of low-carbon electricity for the national grid – enough to power more than 70,000 homes.

Steven Don, Viridor’s Head of Local Authority Contracts Scotland, said: “The Bargeddie Hub is now receiving waste as part of this contract just in time for the very busy post-festive season period.

“The Clyde Valley Partnership is an excellent example of how local authorities can work together to deliver effective waste management and contribute to a circular economy in Scotland.

“The sophisticated technology at Bargeddie improves recycling and non-recyclable waste treatment, maximising the opportunities to recycle while putting non-recyclable waste to work to generate electricity.”

The contract will also see Viridor deliver a number of community benefits, including annual apprenticeships, educational school visits and training workshops for businesses.

For more information on Renfrewshire’s approach to waste and recycling, visit www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/mybins.

St John Bosco Nursery Painting

Renfrewshire Council is recruiting for dozens of senior and entry-level jobs in nurseries across the area.

Ashlie McLaughlan is an Early Years Graduate at Heriot Early Learning and Childcare Class in Paisley, and says learning on-the-job is what’s great about working in nurseries.

St John Bosco Nursery Painting

St John Bosco Nursery Painting

“Being able to learn on-the-job in the early years sector is hugely important and it has helped me get where I am today.

“I’ve always wanted to work with children and support their learning and development and to make a difference in their lives. I’ve worked in several Renfrewshire nurseries, including Hillview Nursery, St Margaret’s ELCC and now Heriot ELCC, for around 14 years now. I have loved every single moment.

“The role of early years graduate is fairly new and it’s great that there are new positions emerging that give nursery staff the chance to progress in their career. Having already achieved my BA in Childhood Practice and been on the Froebel CPD course, I felt that it was the right move for me to take that next step in my journey and work with staff to embed creative, natural and open-ended play within the nursery.

“Sharing our learning with each other is important and I encourage all team members, long-standing or new in post, to contribute to our shared knowledge and learning. I also work with staff members on training to promote our Frobelian approach to early learning.

“Ensuring our parents know what their child does at nursery and sharing their learning experiences is vital too. When we bake scones together, we make sure to share pictures and recipes with families so they can bake at home too.

“Parents know they can contact us at any time to talk about how their child is doing, and they can stay and play in nursery whenever they want. Our door is always open.

“Our children are enjoying being in nursery for longer days too. Having children in nursery all day lets them explore play in more depth and they are progressing better in their learning.

“If the children are engaged in play before lunch, they know they can get back to it after they’ve eaten. It’s also helped friendships develop and deepen, which in turn is helping children get ready for primary school.

“Working in early years is definitely a career that makes a difference to children and their families. It is a supportive profession and there are plenty of learning and development opportunities.

“If you are thinking about taking a step up, or just interesting in getting your first job in a nursery, I would 100% say go for it.”

To apply for an Early Years Graduate role and other positions, visit www.myjobscotland.gov.uk.