Paisley Photographs, official Paisley website containing Photographs of Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland with some superb videos of Paisley and the town.

Mill girls

Paisley Thread Queens

Local artists Gillian Steel and Kevin Cameron along with pupils of Mary Russell School in Paisley are undertaking a project for Paisley Townscape Heritage and Conservation Area Regeneration Scheme (Paisley TH.CARS2).

Mill girls

The Thread Queens Project will involve the pupils exploring the histories and personal stories of the thread mill girls in Paisley. We are looking for women who used to work in the mills to assist the young people in their research by doing interviews about their experiences and would really appreciate anyone who can help us. If you think you can please get in touch with Gillian at gilliansteel@hotmail.com. Look forward to hearing from you!

flightpath

FlightPath Fund award will see pupils from seven schools take part in the Engineering Development Trust’s Go4SET programme –

Pupils from seven local secondary schools will take part in a national Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) competition thanks to a £7000 award from Glasgow Airport’s FlightPath Fund.

flightpath

The project, run by the Engineering Development Trust (EDT), sees teams of six S2 pupils participate in the 10-week regional Go4SET programme. During this time, they will work with a company mentor to produce a report, model and a five-minute presentation on one of three STEM-related projects focusing on sustainability and the environment – Fit for the Future, Smart Surroundings and Future Proof or Designing Building for Climate Change.

As part of the project, the pupils will also take part in a site visit to their mentor’s company to see STEM application in the workplace. 

Go4SET gives the pupils the opportunity to develop skills, inform subject choice and change perceptions about STEM by raising awareness of how studying these subjects can lead to a rewarding career. The pupils taking part in the Go4SET programme will gain an SQA Steps to Work Award SCQF Level 4 and a Bronze Industrial Cadet Award.

Support from the airport’s FlightPath Fund has ensured that 42 S2 pupils from the following secondary schools in Renfrewshire, Glasgow, East and West Dunbartonshire participate in Go4SET:

Bearsden Academy Gleniffer High School

Trinity High School Turnbull High School

St Peter the Apostle High School Clydebank High School

Drumchapel High School

 

Archie Hunter, Chair of the FlightPath Fund, said: “Our science, engineering and technology sectors face significant challenges in terms of skills and people shortages. 

 

“STEM-sector related employment in Scotland is set to grow by 4% by 2027, so projects such as Go4SET are absolutely vital in ensuring these challenges can be met. 

 

“The FlightPath Fund focuses its community investment in a number of areas including education, the environment and employment. Go4SET ticks each of these boxes and the £7000 award from the Fund will ensure that the pupils from the chosen secondary schools in our local communities gain an insight to the exciting STEM-related career opportunities that are out there.”

   

Research has shown that the exposure of younger age groups to STEM related employers, encourages more students to choose post-16 courses in these subject areas, eventually leading to the study of STEM degrees at university. 

A regional section of the Go4SET programme was launched today (Thursday, January 23) at the University of the West of Scotland campus in Paisley. 

Flora Lewis-Gotts, Partnership Manager for Scotland at EDT, said: “We are delighted that the Glasgow Airport FlightPath Fund committee has chosen to support the EDT Go4SET programme this year. 

 

“The programme got underway today with a launch event at the University of West of Scotland, Paisley, where the students met their sponsor and company mentor who will guide them through the project and take them on a site visit.

 

“We are looking forward to welcoming the students back to UWS in May for the Celebration and Assessment Day, when one team will be crowned regional winner and go through to the National Final at the Glasgow Science Centre in June.”

 

In 2019, the FlightPath Fund award more than £110,000 to over 70 local clubs, community groups and charities. This amount was also boosted by a record £20,000 donated by Glasgow Airport passengers via six currency collection globes based in the terminal.  

To find out more about applying for funding support, visit: www.glasgowairport.com/community,

1 paisley centre entrance

A first-of-its kind study with radical ideas for how Paisley town centre could look in a decade has been published – and aims to start a conversation about what might be possible in the town.

The ‘Vision for Paisley Town Centre 2030’ is the result of a unique link-up between Renfrewshire Council, the Scottish Government and Scotland’s Town Partnership – and uses Paisley as a test case for a series of bold ideas imagining how empty retail space could be better used

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Aileen Campbell, Scotland’s Cabinet Secretary for Communities and Local Government, will officially unveil the report at an event in the town centre today.

The study – produced by Glasgow-based Threesixty Architecture – is based on the idea changes to the way people shop have left towns like Paisley with far more retail space than they need

The authors lay out a series of radical ideas for how the town could be rebalanced to better meet community need – bringing with it new life and footfall. Their suggestions include:

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– introducing hundreds of new town centre residents, including repurposing the Paisley Centre shopping centre into a new residential quarter with ground-floor retail;

– new ‘attractors’ such as a High Street cinema, or European-style food hall housing independent food and drink businesses;

– bolstering remaining retail by concentrating it back on to the High Street and street-fronts;

– new public spaces for outdoor activity, and new lanes and streets creating new views and routes to ‘hidden’ parts of the town centre

1 paisley centre entrance

– how key vacant historic buildings such as the Liberal Club, YMCA building and TA Building could be brought back into use;

– other ideas such as shared office spaces or makers’ spaces, a new hotel, and relocating parts of university and college campuses into the heart of the town centre;

Cabinet Secretary Aileen Campbell said: “This study represents another significant milestone in the regeneration of Paisley and is further evidence of the ambition and commitment of the local community and partners.

3 new Liberal Club (1)

“A huge opportunity now exists to use this collaborative vision to create more positive change in the town, as well as sharing learning which can benefit other town centres and communities across Scotland.

“The Scottish Government will continue to work in partnership with local government to support the regeneration of our towns and high streets.”

Renfrewshire Council leader Iain Nicolson said: “The way people shop has changed forever, and towns everywhere are seeing the same issues with empty retail space.

“We can’t turn the clock back but we can consider how we could change to attract new life and footfall in future – and that’s what Paisley is doing.

“It’s important to stress these are not concrete plans – they are a set of ideas designed to spark a conversation about what might be possible over the next decade.

6 YMCA cinema (1)

“Paisley town centre is already changing for the better – the number of new cafes and restaurants and new housing built in recent years shows it is recognised as a good place to live and invest.

“Current and future council investment will make Paisley even more attractive to the private sector, but change of the scale imagined by the Vision could not be achieved by the council alone – so we want to hear from developers who could make that next stage of the journey happen.”

The contents of the report build on work already happening to use Paisley’s unique cultural and heritage story to transform its future through the Future Paisley programme, which aims to build on the momentum created by the town’s bid to be UK City of Culture 2021.

That includes a £100m investment in the town’s venues and outdoor spaces, including turning Paisley Museum into a world-class destination for the town’s internationally-significant collections, which last week saw £3.8m of funding confirmed from the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

Paisley is already finding new uses for vacant High Street spaces – construction will start soon to bring a formerly-empty retail unit back into use as a new learning and cultural hub housing library services, for which the first images have just been revealed.

That will build on the success of Paisley: The Secret Collection – the UK’s first publicly-accessible High Street museum store, which opened in 2017 – showing Paisley’s ambitions to put culture at the heart of its future high street are already being realised.

The Paisley Vision was produced after gathering feedback from key local partners – including community groups, businesses, educational establishments and private developers.

The idea for a High Street cinema is already being taken forward by a local group – the Paisley Community Trust – who, with support from the council, are developing their own plans to convert an existing building for that purpose.

Gary Kerr, chair of the Paisley Community Trust, said: ““It’s exciting to see such a transformational and radical vision for Paisley’s future revealed. Paisley Community Trust fully back this new vision for Paisley and we congratulate Threesixty Architecture on producing a superb piece of work.

“It’s particularly encouraging to see cinema at the forefront of the vision. This completely aligns with our current plans to bring cinema back to the heart of our town.

“We believe a cinema by and for our community is a vital first step in realising the wider vision for regeneration in the town centre. It’s Project One if you like.

“We’ve been working behind the scenes on it for a while now and will reveal more details very soon. We also look forward to seeing the other concepts from the vision being explored and developed into regeneration projects of their own in the years ahead.”

Colette Cardosi, chair of town centre business improvement district Paisley First, added: “In recent years, Paisley has found itself firmly back on the map with fantastic events for visitors and a growing number of independent businesses.

“However, like many towns throughout the country, we need to continuously adapt and evolve and Paisley First welcomes collaboration on any long-term strategy for the future which can help bring in new investment and new footfall to local businesses in Paisley town centre.”

Phil Prentice, chief officer of Scotland’s Towns Partnership, added: “Paisley has a rich tapestry of heritage and culture, is steeped in industry and tradition, and has many major assets.

“We hope this exciting blueprint can create a high street fit for 21st century citizens and Paisley can become an exemplar for other large towns across Scotland.”

Alan Anthony, managing director of Threesixty Architecture, who authored the Vision, said: “This study shows a people-first approach that reconnects the whole community to their town centre.

“We have an unprecedented opportunity to rebalance our High Street back to a place with a rich mix of uses. As a lifelong Paisley Buddy, it’s exciting to think Paisley could lead the way on town centre regeneration in Scotland.”

The council now hopes to hear from developers who are interested in investing in Paisley – with one firm which has already done so believing a template for success already exists.

Brian Clark, managing director of Park Lane Developments, said: “We believe  Park Lane’s partnership with Renfrewshire Council on the regeneration of the former Arnotts department store has already shown the way for how the public and private sector can work together to transform a town centre site.

“That project has already delivered 67 completed private and social rented housing along with the welcome addition of the Pendulum restaurant. The final phase is just about to go for planning and will bring an additional 70  new homes.

“The site was derelict for 10 years and is now back in beneficial use bringing new residents and activity back into the town centre – and shows the potential that exists in Paisley as a place to live and invest.”

Residents and businesses have the chance to see and give their views on the Paisley Vision plans for themselves at a public exhibition open in POP (the former Post Office) in the town’s Piazza shopping centre – on Friday 24 (1 to 4.30pm), Saturday 25 (9.30am to 4.30pm) and Monday 27 January (9.30am to 3pm).

The full report can also be viewed online at www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/paisleyvision, along with a Q&A which goes into more details on the ideas it contains and what happens next.

renfrewshire 2

YOUNG basketball players from Renfrewshire will emulate the hoops superstars of America’s top teams.

Five Primary school teams made up of P6 and P7 pupils have won their way into playing in a Renfrewshire Division of the prestigious Jr. NBA tournament.

renfrewshire 2

The Jr. NBA tournament is played in 70 countries all round the world with 26 million young people taking part.

The local Primary school teams who won through the qualifying rounds locally were Howwood, Heriot, St Fillan’s, Lochfield and Kirklandneuk.

And pupils attended a special coaching session and draft ceremony at Paisley’s Lagoon Leisure Centre to be told which top American teams from the National Basketball Association’s Pacific Division whose name they will take. Each pupil was also presented with a basketball top of the team they will play as.

Howwood Primary will play as the Phoenix Sons; Heriot will be the Sacramento Kings; St Fillan’s, the Golden State Warriors; Lochfield, the LA Lakers and Kirkandneuk will be the LA Clippers.

renfrewshire 2

All the teams are mixed gender and must have at least five girls and five boys in their squad. The competition is being staged locally by Renfrewshire Leisure, along with the BasketballPaisley organisation.

Over the next two months the teams will play each other and the top two will go on to compete against teams from Glasgow and Ayrshire primary schools and the best two teams from that round will play teams from around Scotland.

After the all-Scotland round the basketballscotland umbrella organisation will chose two pupils to go forward to the European trials to become part of a European and Middle East team to compete in the Jr. NBA Global Championships.

Renfrewshire Leisure chairperson, Councillor Lisa-Marie Hughes said: “This is a great opportunity for local pupils to take part in a tournament that will be replicated in many countries around the world.

“The young people were very excited to eventually find out which of the professional American basketball teams they would be playing as. And it got even better when they were presented with their tops that are exact replicas of the ones the American superstar players wear.”

1 exterior high st

The first images showing how a vacant former retail unit at the heart of Paisley’s High Street will be turned into a 21st-century community facility housing library services are today revealed.

1 exterior high st

Construction will start soon on the £7m Paisley Learning and Cultural Hub – a new modern community and educational facility which will bring new footfall to the town centre.

When it opens in summer 2021, the building will provide a new digitally-connected home for a range of services, including those currently offered at Paisley Central Library.

As the images released today show, that will include:

3 interior recption

– a comprehensive internal remodelling of the existing building, over four floors;

– an attractive ground-and-first-floor frontage with a modern look – which complements the High Street surroundings and preserves the historic features on the building’s upper floors;

– children’s library with areas for areas for reading, play, storytelling and learning;

4 interior childrens area

– IT areas and suite – offering free public digital access in the heart of the town centre

The new facility is the latest example of how Renfrewshire Council is helping repopulate the town’s High Street by finding new cultural and community uses for vacant retail property.

It follows Paisley: The Secret Collection – the UK’s first publicly-accessible High St museum store –which opened two years ago in the basement of the town’s former Littlewoods store.

2 section exterior

The four-floor unit at 22a High Street which will house the learning and cultural hub was last occupied by clothing chain Internacionale – but has been empty for a decade.

The work is part of a wider investment in the town’s venues and outdoor spaces which will see Paisley Museum transformed into a world-class home for the town’s internationally-significant collections, and Paisley Town Hall kept at the heart of local life as a landmark entertainment venue.

The project includes £1.5m funding from the Scottish Government’s Regeneration Capital Grant Fund and is being delivered on behalf of the council by hub West Scotland who have appointed Collective Architecture to create the new design and main contractor CCG to deliver the refurbishment.

Councillor Lisa-Marie Hughes, chair of Renfrewshire Leisure Ltd, which will operate the facility, said: “We are delighted to be able to reveal these images, which show a modern and accessible community resource for people of all ages to learn and be inspired.

“We are putting the power of culture to change lives at the heart of everything we do – so putting a building offering library services at the heart of Paisley High Street is a bold statement of intent.

“The Learning and Cultural Hub will bring back into use a building which had been empty for some time, and had been allowed to deteriorate by previous owners.

“The future for Paisley town centre is in finding new ways to repopulate vacant retail units with cultural, leisure and community uses which will give people a reason to come into the town centre.

“As well as hosting library services, it will be able to host events and book readings – helping bring footfall into the High Street and supporting surrounding businesses.”

Iain Marley, hub West’s CEO said: “We are delighted to partner with Renfrewshire Council and lead the delivery of this very important project.

“The council has a very clear and powerful vision for the role the Learning and Cultural Hub will play in the rejuvenation of the High Street and the benefits that the investment that it will bring for residents and visitors.

“We are proud to help make this vision a reality and ensure the project maximises employment, training and other opportunities for local communities and businesses.”

Paisley Central Library is currently operating from a temporary building next to the Lagoon Leisure Centre, having moved from its former home next to Paisley Museum in 2018.

Renfrewshire Heritage Library remains open at Abbey Mill and will move into the museum when it reopens in 2022.

The former Paisley Central Library building at the top of the High Street will form part of the expanded Paisley Museum when it reopens in 2022.

For more information see www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/paisley

Proposed front elevation

An innovative housing project in Renfrewshire will help to tackle climate change and could slash tenant’s annual heating bills to £150.

Proposed front elevation

Renfrewshire Council’s housing investment team has been given the green light to deliver a £4.5million retrofit of 75 terraced council houses.

The popular 1960s-built Paisley crosswall construction properties are being given a retrofit to reduce their carbon emissions and improve their energy efficiency.

Together with experts John Gilbert Architects, the Council team has developed a specialist, cost-effective package of works to radically reduce the amount of fuel being burned.

The completed works could enable carbon dioxide emissions to drop by almost 100 tonnes per property over the next 25 years, collectively preventing 7400 tonnes of Carbon Dioxide entering the environment.

And each property’s energy efficiency could rise from Band D to Band B, the second highest Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) rating, bringing the 60-year-old houses in line with most newbuild properties.

Councillor Marie McGurk, Convener of Renfrewshire Council’s Communities, Housing and Planning Board, said: “These houses are very popular with tenants as they have a front and back door, but unfortunately they weren’t built to meet modern energy efficiency standards.

“We’re very excited about this project which will improve the warmth and comfort levels for our tenants and ensure better ventilation all without the need for them to decant from their home, while at the same time tackling fuel poverty and making a critical contribution towards Renfrewshire being carbon neutral by 2030.

“Everyone should have homes to be proud of and this project will not only greatly improve the quality of Renfrewshire’s housing stock, but has the potential to be scaled up and adapted to fit other types of houses, becoming the blueprint to meet the highest energy efficiency standards.”

Renfrewshire councillors have approved the project plans and consultation will now get underway with tenants before work is scheduled to start this summer, taking around 18-months to complete.

An Energy Performance Survey will benchmark each home’s efficiency before the works start. New external wall insulation, roofing, solar panels, windows, external doors and underfloor insulation are all included, with off-site construction enabling the process at each home to be streamlined to take around 4-6 weeks.

The completed works will achieve the EnerPHit standard, one of the highest energy standards in the UK for an energy performance retrofit.

Lori McElroy, Director of Housing and Energy (Scotland) at the Building Research Establishment, said: “We’re pleased to help with the planning behind this project, which is taking innovative thinking to the next stage by demonstrating a clear solution to a complex issue. We are committed to supporting organisations to deliver the Scottish Government’s Energy Efficient Scotland targets and look forward to measuring and monitoring the project to ensure the best possible outcomes.”

Sarah Buchanan, Innovation Manager, Construction Scotland Innovation Centre, said: “We are delighted to be working with Renfrewshire Council and other partners on this innovative project which will bring positive change to the lives of the tenants whilst also creating economic development for Scotland and of course improving carbon emissions. There are an estimated 250,000 crosswall properties across the UK and this pilot project creates an affordable solution for housing stock which can be rolled out at scale.”

The project is part-funded through £1.8million secured from the UK Government Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Whole House Retrofit competition.

Primary - Heriot - HT, DHT and P2, P5 and P6 pupils - 17 Jan 2020 - JCON (23)

Pupils and teachers at two Paisley schools were over the moon to find out their latest positive inspection results.

Primary - Heriot - HT, DHT and P2, P5 and P6 pupils - 17 Jan 2020 - JCON (23)

Heriot Primary School and Mary Russell School received high praise by Education Scotland for their schools’ progress on improving attainment for children and young people.

Heriot primary was praised for the headteacher’s leadership within the school and the teachers’ creative approaches to learning numeracy and mathematics.

The positive, supportive and inclusive culture within Mary Russell was noted as making for confident children and young people who are achieving a range of national qualifications and wider awards.

Pupils talked positively about their schools, particularly on how they are benefitting from their schools’ ethos.

One pupil at Mary Russell said: “This school is a community and a family. I get lots of support.”

Another pupil added: “We get lots of support to help us decide what to study at college, or what job we want to get. We have visitors who come in and talk to us about our future options.”

At Heriot primary, pupils spoke of their love of maths.

One pupil said: “My favourite subject is maths. It gets your brain going and the teachers give us a challenge, which is fun.”

Another pupil added: “We use the blueprint boards, pictures and materials, like cereal and playdough, to learn maths.”

Hilary Paterson, Headteacher of Heriot primary, added: “I’m incredibly proud to be the Headteacher of Heriot Primary School and our very positive inspection report reflects the dedication and commitment of our staff team.

“Together we continually strive to improve our practice to better support our children and community and improve outcomes for all. We are delighted that our inspection team identified how highly-motivated, engaged and confident our children are due to the nurturing and creative approaches we use at Heriot.”

Headteacher of Mary Russell School, Julie McCallum, said: “We are delighted with the outcomes of the report and especially pleased that inspectors recognised the strong, positive ethos and inclusive culture in our school which is built on our school values.

“Our approaches to wellbeing are improving outcomes for our learners and are leading to positive and sustained destinations for our young people on leaving school.

“Our thanks go to everyone who is involved in the work of our school, our pupils, staff, parents and partners to ensure we continue to deliver high quality outcomes for children and young people with additional support needs.

“Our whole learning community is very proud of what we have achieved and is testament to our school motto of Be All We Can Be! Be Proud of Who We Are!”

To view the inspection reports, visit https://education.gov.scot/education-scotland.

single cover

Lisa has a lot happening in January before she heads off to Holland leave us in peace for a few months.

Her new single No More Time comes out on 31 January, followed shortly after by a video for the song and there is a single launch gig in Paisley at CC’s on 31 January.

lisa and new guitar

The video was funded by a grant from Creative Scotland Time to Shine.

As well as her single launch, its a send off, the last gig in UK until August and an early birthday party as she will be in Holland by time she is 20 on 6th February.

Im obviously keen to get as much attention for it as possible, especially as it has taken her a year to get to a place where she was ready to launch new music to the big bad world. I dont have the final copy of the video yet but will be happy to share it with you and a link to the single once its live.

Its not the Chef funded Paisley song but one she wrote a while back. She is also setting herself the challenge of writing and producing the Paisley song before she heads off. We might get a draft of it at the gig at CCs, Im not sure though.

electric warehouse

No More Time was written about 2 years ago but its release was delayed by Lisa’s mental health break earlier this year. The song is about one of the experiences that contributed to her depression, a very toxic relationship which she took her time to extricate herself from. Its positive though as its celebrating finally being able to make the break.

single cover

Its very unlike her previous material.  Lisa’s first time playing electric guitar on a track and she also produced a lot of it herself which was a major challenge at times but turned out well in the end.

Visit and Like Lisa’s Facebook page to keep informed about upcoming gigs/

Partners at the Bargeddie plant

A unique new contract will see a minimum of 90% of Renfrewshire’s waste transformed into energy as the area meets the Scottish Government’s landfill ban.

Partners at the Bargeddie plant

The £700 million, 25-year Clyde Valley Residual Waste Project between East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, North Ayrshire, North Lanarkshire and Renfrewshire Council and Viridor is now underway and will serve almost one-sixth of Scotland’s population.

It will see up to 190,000 tonnes of general waste diverted from landfill and converted to low-carbon energy and is expected provide a net saving of almost 50,000 tonnes of CO2e every year.

It will also deliver a guaranteed minimum increase in recycling for Renfrewshire, further enhancing the area’s growing environmental prospects having seen its recycling rate improve every quarter since December 2018.

Councillor Cathy McEwan, Convener of Renfrewshire Council’s Infrastructure, Land and Environment Policy Board, said: “A key priority of the council is tackling climate change and this project will make a significant difference to the level of C02 we produce by improving the way we deal with our waste.

“Anything that cannot be recycled will now no longer go to landfill and will be transformed into energy instead, making a real difference to our environment and taking our commitment to recycling to a new level.

“Our teams have been working hard over the last decade to make this a reality and we’re looking forward to working with our partnership authorities to ensure that the project achieves the environmental aims it sets out.”

This is the first partnership of its kind in Scotland and will see household waste taken from Renfrewshire and the other local authorities to a Materials Recovery Facility, where it will be further separated to remove recyclable materials before it is treated to produce a refuse derived fuel.

Then, at the brand-new Energy Recover Facility at Dunbar, it is burned at high temperatures, under carefully controlled conditions to produce 258GWh of low-carbon electricity for the national grid – enough to power more than 70,000 homes.

Steven Don, Viridor’s Head of Local Authority Contracts Scotland, said: “The Bargeddie Hub is now receiving waste as part of this contract just in time for the very busy post-festive season period.

“The Clyde Valley Partnership is an excellent example of how local authorities can work together to deliver effective waste management and contribute to a circular economy in Scotland.

“The sophisticated technology at Bargeddie improves recycling and non-recyclable waste treatment, maximising the opportunities to recycle while putting non-recyclable waste to work to generate electricity.”

The contract will also see Viridor deliver a number of community benefits, including annual apprenticeships, educational school visits and training workshops for businesses.

For more information on Renfrewshire’s approach to waste and recycling, visit www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/mybins.

PAC Guide Launch

THE world premiere of John Byrne’s new play, Underwood Lane is one of the highlights of a packed programme of music, theatre, comedy, dance and literature coming to Renfrewshire in the next few months.

PAC Guide Launch

The musical play set in Paisley tells the story of a young skiffle band trying to make the big time.

Artist and playwright, Byrne has written Underwood Lane in memory of his close friend and fellow Buddie, singer-songwriter Gerry Rafferty who died nine years ago this month.

PAC Guide Launch

Byrne is one of Scotland’s most talented artists and writers and is best known for his paintings, theatrical masterpieces like The Slab Boys Trilogy and the hit TV shows, Tutti Frutti and Your Cheatin’ Heart.

The play – a co-production from Renfrewshire Leisure and Glasgow’s Tron Theatre – is being premiered at Paisley Arts Centre between Thursday, June 25 and Sunday, June 28. This will be the last show at Paisley Arts Centre before it closes for refurbishment this summer.

PAC Guide Launch

More information about the Underwood Road performances and a host of other events, shows and performances being staged in Renfrewshire are featured in the recently-published What’s On booklet, The Guide for Spring 2020.

The Guide – available to download from www.renfrewshireleisure.com or picked up from all Renfrewshire Leisure sports facilities and venues – details how there is something for everyone when it comes to entertainment, events and stimulating talks and classes at local venues.

There is a strong programme for families including The Shark in the Park Musical show, based on the popular Nick Sharratt’s children’s books, which is being staged at Johnstone Town Hall, on Wednesday February 26.

Children and adults will also be able to enjoy the Easter Fun Day with circus-themed activities along with arts and crafts, at Johnstone Town Hall, on Saturday, April 11.

A not-to-be-missed theatre performance from Arabella Weir, star of TV’s The Fast Show and Two Doors Down, is at Paisley Arts Centre, on Friday, March 27. A best-selling author and actor, Arabella’s show is called Does My Mum Loom Big In This? as she takes to the stage to describe some hilarious anecdotes from her dysfunctional childhood.

Traditional Celtic music at its best can be heard when The Tannahill Weavers play Paisley Arts Centre on Saturday, February 15. And the Scottish Alternative Music Awards return to Paisley Arts Centre for the third year, on Friday and Saturday, March 13 and 14.

For the first time a Paisley Book Festival is being held at various venues between Thursday, February 20 and Saturday, February 29 with the central theme of Radical Voices and Rebel Stories.

Chairperson of Renfrewshire Leisure, Councillor Lisa-Marie Hughes said: “We have a wonderful array of entertainment and events planned for the next few months.

“We’re really excited about the world premiere of John Byrne’s Underwood Lane, which is a play written by a Paisley Buddie, about Paisley and being performed for the first time in Paisley. I’m sure the shows will be a sell-out.

“There’s definitely something for everyone in the latest issue of The Guide whether its music, theatre, dance, children’s entertainment or literature that people enjoy.”