sma shot day

Sma’ Shot Day 2019 was a fantastic day out for thousands of Paisley buddies as we watched the parade come down from Brodie Park at the Dooslan Stane to its new finish point right beside Sma’ Shot Cottages themselves, lots to do, great bit of sunshine went down well too as Tony Lawler who has been the Charleston Drummer now for 27 years.

Brian McGuire captured the parade from start to finish and even some bits of the main stage before the finale.

sma shot day 2019

The Sma’ Shot celebration always takes place on the first Saturday in July – to mark the time of year when the weavers and their families would traditionally take their holidays.

This year will be no different – everyone is invited to join the annual party this Saturday 6 July from 12 noon to 5pm. And with almost 50 events taking place across 20 different venues, this year’s celebration promises to be the best yet!

sma shot day 2019

Festivities will get underway at noon as the colourful parade leaves Brodie Park, heading for Paisley Arts Centre led by the tuck of the Charleston Drum. The parade this year will feature local groups, performers, spectacular floats and giant puppets, all co-ordinated by parade specialists Bridgeman Arts.

2019 will also see Sma’ Shot Day return to its roots, quite literally, by moving to the streets around the historic Sma’ Shot Cottages in Paisley’s town centre; with Shuttle Street, New Street, Witherspoon Street and Brown’s Lane all set to come alive with music, theatre, poetry, crafts and lots of family-friendly activities.

sma shot day 2019

Amongst these activities there will of course be the Burning of the Cork (1.20pm within the grounds of Paisley Arts Centre) which sees the ‘Corks’ – the middlemen between the owners and the weavers – meet their fate at the hands of the working weavers in spectacular fashion. Right2Dance will deliver a short pre-Burning of the Cork performance with live music in front of Paisley Arts Centre at 1.15pm.

sma shot day 2019

Plus, there will be lots of opportunities to learn a new craft at a series of artists workshops taking place all over Paisley. Follow the Creative Craft Trail for mural painting, jewellery making, embroidery and loads more.

The Sma’ Shot Cottages will also be open 12 noon til 5pm for your chance to see what life was really like for the weavers in the 19th century. Catch a guided tour and watch live weaving demonstrations with Paisley Museum’s textiles expert, Dan Coughlan. We also recommend a trip to Paisley Thread Mill Museum to complete your weaving experience on the industry’s most celebrated day of the year.

Download the Paisley.is handy event map and start planning your day!

 

Paisley’s annual Spree festival has today announced its biggest line-up yet – with Glasvegas, Gruff Rhys, PP Arnold and Hue and Cry among the acts coming to town this October.

The festival will take place over nine days from 11 to 19 October with the bulk of the action in a specially-erected Spiegeltent beside Paisley Gilmour Street station – and with a bigger tent than in previous years allowing 500-person shows.

Now in its eighth year, the festival is one of the centrepieces of Renfrewshire Council’s major events programme which has made Paisley one of Scotland’s key cultural destinations in recent years.

The Spree 2019 was programmed by Regular Music – who work with some of the biggest names in the industry as the team behind the Summer Nights at Kelvingrove Bandstand and the Edinburgh Castle Concerts – and is this year sponsored by Tennent’s Lager.

The festival kicks off on Friday 11 October with a tribute to one of Paisley’s most celebrated musical sons – A Gerry Rafferty Songbook, featuring Roddy Hart, Emma Pollock and Rab Noakes.

Monday 14th sees Hue and Cry in the Spiegeltent – a venue and location fitting for a band for whom one of their biggest hits, ‘Looking for Linda’, was set on a train to Paisley.

Platinum-selling indie-rockers Glasvegasperform their only full-band Scottish date of the year the next night, before Super Furry Animals frontman Gruff Rhys brings his solo show to the Spiegeltent on Wednesday 16th.

London’s First Lady of Soul PP Arnold is next up on Thursday 17th with songs from her six-decade career working with stars including Rod Stewart and the Small Faces, Barry Gibb, David Bowie, Eric Clapton and Oasis.

The Friday night sees multi-award-winning singer-songwriter Karine Polwart bring her Scottish Songbook – a collection of Scottish pop classic spanning more than 50 years.

And the festival ends on Saturday 19th with anarchic magic from comedy headliner Jerry Sadowitz, followed by what will be a lively late-night closing party all the way from Tennessee, USA, with the inventors of ‘rockgrass’ Hayseed Dixie.

There’s also two late-night comedy shows on Friday 11th and 18th, headlined by Mark Nelson and Gary Little and compered by Fred MacAulay and local lad Scott Gibson.

Renfrewshire Leisure are programming Spree shows at Paisley Arts Centre, with the ones announced so far being Lost Map’s Lost Weekend Sunday Social featuring the Pictish Trail, Fell, Molly Linen and Callum Easter (Sunday 13th), Paisley in Song featuring Michael Cassidy and Andy Monahan (Frightened Rabbit) on Thursday 17th, and ex-Arab Strap musician Malcolm Middleton plus support (Saturday 19th).

And the Spiegeltent will also host an all-day festival within-a-festival on Saturday 12th with LNP Promotions ever-popular ModStuffcelebration of all things Mod, for which the line-up will be confirmed soon.

Tickets for all shows go on sale at 10am on Friday 7 June via thespree.co.uk and www.ticketweb.uk

More will be added to the bill over the summer with details still to be announced for The Wee Spree – a programme of children’s entertainment over the October school holidays – and the Spree for All fringe festival, with a range of shows in other venue across Renfrewshire.

Duncan Frew, Tennent’s Lager’s Commercial and Marketing Director (UK), added: “Tennent’s are delighted to partner with the Spree Festival in 2019.

“The festival continues to go from strength to strength, developing a national profile through an impressive programme of local and international artists and activity. We look forward to working with organisers and local community to help build on this success.”

Louisa Mahon, Renfrewshire Council’s head of marketing, communications and events, added: “The Spree has grown in recent years to become a fixture in Scotland’s festival calendar – and we are delighted the expanded capacity this year has allowed us to attract some of our biggest names yet.

“Not only will that bring music fans from across the country to see what Paisley has to offer but the growth in the event will help bring a real festival feel to the town, and a boost the local economy.”

For more information on the festival, see www.thespree.co.uk and for more on what’s happening in Paisley visit www.paisley.is

grandad pic

Real-life grandads and their grandsons from the Paisley area will take to the stage to become stars of a theatre show about the relationships between men and boys.

The show Old Boy is being performed at Paisley Arts Centre on Wednesday and Thursday, June 5 and 6 at 7.30pm.

grandad pic

And three local granddads and their grandsons will be on stage performing in the shows presented by the Glasgow-based theatre company Glas(s) Performance.

The men and boys taking part are grandfather, Ray Brown, aged 65, from Quarrier’s Village, near Kilmacolm and his two-year-old grandson, Harvey Millar, from Paisley; Patrick Head, aged 66 and his nine-year-old grandson, Dalton, from Penilee along with 82-year-old Monty Colvan and his grandson, Owen Fyfe, aged 21, from Crookston.

Ray Brown looks after Harvey three days a week and he takes his grandson along to various activities like swimming, Bookbug sessions and the Gym Joey’s classes at the ON-X sports centre, in Linwood.

Rays said: “I’ve never been on stage before and neither has Harvey, since he’s only two. But we’re really looking forward to it and I’ve no doubt Harvey will enjoy himself, as he loves mixing with people.

“I’ll be doing all the talking on stage and Harvey will be enjoying himself playing with toys.”

Ray has been used to being in front of a large audience as before he retired he was a senior manager with a large insurance company and has spoken to audiences of hundreds at conferences all over the world. He even shared a stage with Nelson Mandela in 1997 during a conference held in Zimbabwe.

Ray added: “I spend a lot of time with Harvey and I thought it would be exciting for him to take part in the show. I’m quite looking forward to it myself!”

Jess Thorpe, Co-Artistic Director of the show said: “We’re excited to introduce audiences in Renfrewshire to the real-life relationships of three local sets of grandfathers and their grandsons and to share the stories of love, legacy and tenderness in their family relationships.

“Old Boy is a show about love, tenderness and care between men. This is a side of masculinity which we rarely get to see on stage and something that feels important to celebrate.”

Since the show is about men and boys, Renfrewshire Leisure is offering children into the performance for free when they are accompanied by a paying adult.

Log on to www.renfrewshireleisure.com or call 0300 300 1210 to buy a ticket at only £5.

Old Boy. Glass Performance. Platform, Glasgow. October 2017

This award-winning company present a show about men, boys and emotion featuring a cast of real-life grandfathers and grandsons focusing on legacy, inheritance, history and ageing

Devised and Performed by a local cast of men and boys from Renfrewshire

 

Paisley Arts Centre

5th and 6TH June

7.30pm

£5

Running time: 1 hr

 

“Utterly life-affirming” ★★★★ The Herald

Old Boy. Glass Performance. Platform, Glasgow. October 2017

 

OLD BOY is a show which is re-made and performed by a new cast local to each venue it visits. It was originally created at Platform in Glasgow which was then featured as part of the Made in Scotland showcase at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. It has since toured to Northumberland, will visit Washington DC and London this summer and in June will come to Paisley Arts Centre.

OLD features real-life grandfathers and grandsons aged 2 – 82 as they perform this tender performance about making memories together, exploring what men and boys have meant, might mean and do mean to each other, what has been difficult and perhaps not talked about before. OLD BOY reflects on the legacies passed down through generations, received notions of masculinity and how these ideas impact on real lives lived.

Jess Thorpe, Co-Artistic Director, said: “We are delighted to be bringing OLD BOY to Paisely Arts Centre as every time we make it in a new place it feels new and we learn loads from the men and boy we get to work with. We are excited to introduce audiences in Renfrewshire to the real-life relationships of three local sets of grandfathers and their grandsons and to share the stories of love, legacy and tenderness in their family relationships. OLD BOY is, amongst its many aspects, a show about love, tenderness and care between men. This is a side of masculinity which we rarely get to see on stage and something that feels important to celebrate.”

Old Boy. Glass Performance. Platform, Glasgow. October 2017

Glas(s) Performance is an award-winning Glasgow based theatre company run by performance directors Jess Thorpe and Tashi Gore. Glas(s) Performance work with real people in the place of fictional characters to tell human stories that resonate with audiences of all ages and experiences. They have been making this work for 14 years now and have produced over 30 pieces of new work inspired by the people they have met.

 

Past shows include: Life Long (2010) a show about love featuring Tillie and Ronnie Jeffrey, a couple who have been married for 55 years. Hand Me Down (2011) about the things women pass down to each other in families with Margaret Hendy, her daughters, granddaughters, sisters, nieces and cousin.

Albert Drive (2013) A large-scale project looking at the idea of neighbours from the perspective of one street in Pollokshields, Glasgow. GLIMMER (2014) The story of two sisters at Christmas with Rosie and Megan Reid. Recent co-production include The Happiness Project (2015) with the Roundhouse and SPOTLIGHT (2015) with Rogaland Teater in Norway.

Glas(s) Performance also produce award-winning Junction 25, a company of young performers aged between 11 -18 based at Tramway. www.junction-25.com.

 

Company

 

Devised and performed by local cast of grandsons and grandfathers from Renfrewshire

Designer Rachel O’Neill

Sound Design Harry Wilson

Lighting Design Kate Bonney  

 

Web and social media links: www.glassperformance.co.uk | @glassperform | #OLDBOY

 

 

Listings information

 

Old Boy  – a coproduction between Glas(s) Performance and Paisley Arts Centre

Paisley Arts Centre

5th and 6TH June

7.30pm

£5

Running time: 1 hr

The Guitar Man

The debut production from surrogate productions, The Guitar Man, opens as part of

Platform’s Outskirts Festival on Saturday 27 April, before embarking on a tour around Scotland in May.

The Guitar Man

‘Everything has its time, a man and a piece of music…’  

 

A man makes his living singing the same songs day after day on the edge of town. He plays to an audience that is always on the move, always passing him by. People call him The Guitar Man.

 

On a winter’s night, he takes shelter and tells us his story: he came here because of a woman, and stayed here because of a son. Searching for answers to the past, present and future, he reaches a decision: to stop playing.  

 

In a world made up of winners and losers, The Guitar Man asks what is left when we

reject the role we are expected to play? Written in 1997, by Norwegian writer Jon Fosse, the play speaks anew to a post-industrial society in crisis, where rootlessness and

homelessness have become a common experience.

 

Weaving text, song and silence to create an intimate, physical and disquieting

theatrical experience, this tender study of a so-called ‘outsider’ traces the delicate balance between loneliness and longing, loss and salvation.

 

The Guitar Man will be played by female performer Renee Williams, and is directed by actor and director, and Artistic Director of surrogate productions, Nora Wardell. The

production features a composition of vocal and guitar fragments by artist, composer and performer, Hanna Tuulikki with sound design by Kevin Murray. The creative team also includes dramaturgy by Eszter Marsalkó, set and costume design by Sarah Beaton and lighting design by Emma Jones.

Voice and Verse

PAISLEY Arts Centre will be hosting three dementia friendly concerts this spring, presented by Live Music Now.

Voice and Verse

This begins with Aidan Moodie and Graham Rorie, on Wednesday, February 20, featuring an eclectic mix of traditional and self-penned tunes and songs from across Scotland and beyond.

The other LMN performances are MK Duo, who are Roberto Kuhn and Callum Morton-Teng on Wednesday March 13 and Voice and Verse, who are Laura McFall and Kristine Donnan on Wednesday June 12.

MK Duo

A spokesperson for Live Music Now said:

“Live Music Now Scotland’s dementia friendly concerts are relaxed and informal, and the audience is invited to sing and dance along if they like.

“We have consulted with experts in dementia to find a format that is likely to be both enjoyable and beneficial to the audience’s health and wellbeing.

Graham Rorie and Aidan Moodie

“The musicians tailor the performance so that some tunes may already be familiar, and therefore good for singing along to, which means the concert becomes interactive with everyone feeling welcome to join in.

“For those who prefer just to listen, they can enjoy a cup of tea and a biscuit while being entertained by outstanding performers.

“It has been shown that participating in arts activities is extremely beneficial for older people with dementia, improving such things as communication, memory, enjoyment of life and creative thinking.”

For more information, or to book one of these performances call Renfrewshire Leisure box office on 0300 300 1210 or go to www.renfrewshireleisure.com/whats-on.

Tickets for these performances are £5, and include tea and coffee. Carers go free.

ladder to the stars

There’s something for everyone to enjoy in the latest programme of shows and events organised by Renfrewshire Leisure during the coming months.

Information about these cultural activities is contained in the newly-published free booklet, The Guide.

ladder to the stars

Renfrewshire Leisure will host a variety of theatre performances as part of Puppet Animation Festival. These performances during April include both puppet theatre and animated films.

New venues will be staging shows and events after Paisley Town Hall and Paisley Museum are closed for redevelopment.

The Out of Place programme features the User Not Found theatre performance in the Paisley Arts Centre café, on May 8 and the Dark Carnival Unplugged is performed in the Paisley Arts Centre grounds, on May 17.

The Guide also highlights a series of acting writing and directing workshops from In Motion Theatre Company.

Paisley Arts Centre will host the Scottish Alternative Music Awards on March 15 and 16, featuring live showcases, music industry seminars and workshops.

The Arts Centre will also be turned into a virtual reality, 3D playground as Paisley YMCA presents Synaethesia, on June 29.

Music fans have a variety of concerts to enjoy, including the Acoustic Beatles and Acoustic Eagles, on February 1; singer Mary Ann Kennedy, on April 27 and legendary piper, Fred Morrison, on May 14, all at Paisley Arts Centre.

Victoria Hollows, Renfrewshire Leisure chief executive said: “There is something for everyone in the guide – from comedy acts to family shows, drama performances to traditional music along with interesting and informative exhibitions.”

The Guide can be picked up for free at Paisley Arts Centre, Renfrew and Johnstone Town Halls and Linwood’s Tweedie Hall or it can be downloaded from www.renfrewshireleisure.com.

To book any of the events log on to www.renfrewshireleisure.com/whats-on or call the Box Office on 0300 300 1210 or visit Paisley Arts Centre, in New Street, Paisley.

paisley town hall

THE final fling before Paisley Town Hall closed for a major refurbishment was of the Highland variety.

A sell-out Festive Family Ceilidh was the last event before the doors closed until the Town Hall re-opens in 2021 as a major venue attracting events and people to the town.

ceilidh

The festive ceilidh featuring traditional Scottish music and dancing has been a popular event for several years.

Victoria Hollows, chief executive of Renfrewshire Leisure said: “There was no better way to celebrate both the end of the year and the Town Hall closing for renovation than to have a full-house of people enjoying themselves.

“And when the building re-opens there will be many more exciting events and shows taking place there to look forward to.”

The refurbishment of the Town Hall is one of the key projects within Renfrewshire Council’s £100 million investment in venues and infrastructure over the next few years, as part of a wider plan to use the town’s unique heritage and cultural assets to transform its future.

bookbug

PAISLEY’S Central Library may have closed, but its free Bookbug sessions for kids are still going on at a new venue.

bookbug

Bookbug’s new home every Monday is at The Lagoon Leisure, Centre, in Paisley.

The Baby Bookbug Group meet to hear stories being told, sing a song or two and generally have lots of fun from 10.15am to 10.45am and the Toddler Group meets from 11.15am to 11.45am.

Bookbug is Scottish Book Trust’s Early Years programme, encouraging parents and children to read together from birth along with a range of fun activities.

Paisley Central Library will move to a temporary home in early 2019 next to the Lagoon Leisure Centre before moving to the new learning and cultural hub being built on the High Street when it re-opens in 2021.

Public access PCs are available at the Paisley.Is offices at 5a High Street, Paisley. Library staff will be on-hand to assist visitors and the opening hours are Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday 9am – 5pm and Tuesday and Thursday 9am – 8pm.

The heritage library will go to a temporary home in Mile End Mill for the next four years then move back into the museum when it reopens.

The work is part of an investment in Paisley town centre venues by Renfrewshire Council to support a wider push to use the town’s unique cultural and heritage assets to transform the area’s future and bring new footfall to the town centre.