ferguslie-mills

Ferguslie Mills Site Now & Then by drone as we fly past the old counting house and one of the lovely gatehouses, you will see what a difference the old site looks like these days. Please visit our YouTube Page click Like and Subscribe for updates

Video courtesy of Paisley Buddie Drone Flights.

Renfrew Golf Club Pro Am August 1977

IT was the day huge crowds turned out at Renfrew Golf Club to catch a glimpse of famous celebrities playing in a charity tournament.

One of the famous faces teeing off was none other than 007 himself, Sean Connery, who was joined by other stars from the world of entertainment and sport for a round of golf on the local course.

Renfrew Golf Club Pro Am August 1977

Image of Henry Cooper, Sean Connery, Jimmy Tarbuck and woman unknown, at Renfrew Golf Club participating in a Saints and Sinners Pro-Am tournament in aid of the Variety Club

Now a film looking back on that special day is to premier on Renfrewshire Leisure’s online television channel Ren TV, at 7pm on Friday, September 25.

Created by local filmmaker, Paul Russell, the film, Watch The Birdie, captures the excitement of locals as they watched the golf tournament – in aid of the Variety Club of Great Britain – held in August 1977.

As well as Sean Connery, one-time British, Commonwealth and European boxing champion, Henry Cooper, along with TV stars Bruce Forsyth and Jimmy Tarbuck also played in the tournament, at the Renfrew golf course.

Paul revealed that the film was inspired by the hilarious responses to some pictures taken at the event by photographer Pete Degnan, which had been posted on the Renfrew REMO Facebook page, where Renfrew residents share memories of their town.

The photographs prompted a lot of discussion and humorous anecdotes being posted on the social media page.

The film features interviews with event organisers, those who caddied on the day; Norry Wilson of the popular Lost Glasgow social history blog and photographer, Pete Degnan, who travelled from Derby to take part.

Paul said: “Younger viewers might not get the significance, but to have Sean Connery, Henry Cooper, James Hunt, Bruce Forsyth and Jimmy Tarbuck, to name but a few coming to Renfrew, would be today’s equivalent of having Daniel Craig, Tyson Fury, Lewis Hamilton, and Ant and Dec all coming to play a round at Renfrew Golf Club. These were the big stars of the day.”

“Lockdown has been a tough shift in lots of ways for everybody, but these recent times have really gathered people together in a virtual sense, brought happier times into focus and helped us all get through it.”

“Pete Degnans photographs are a gift in this regard and it is in the conversations, anecdotes and memories his images prompt, in which the real magic occurs.

“Every community has something to be proud of, things which make it unique, and it can be a comfort to remember and talk about these, especially when it can seem like the chips are down and past certainties can no longer be taken for granted.”

Chairperson of Renfrewshire Leisure, Councillor Lisa-Marie Hughes said: “I can’t wait to watch this film.

“As well as bearing witness to part of Renfrew’s social history where the community came together for an extraordinary event, I’m sure the film will be very entertaining and bring a smile to the faces of everyone watching – especially those who remember the golf tournament and saw the stars coming out to play at Renfrew Golf Club.”

The film is a Future Paisley project, as part of a radical and wide-ranging programme of events, activities and investments using the town’s unique and internationally significant cultural stories to transform its future.

To see Watch The Birdie go to www.renfrewshireleisure.com/rentv/.

Strictly come prancing

St. Vincent’s Hospice are looking for couples and volunteers from the same household to sign up to take part in their Strictly Come Prancing event in Spring 2021, as the charity begin preparations to allow the event to go ahead in a safe, fun and socially distanced dance spectacular.

Strictly come prancing

St. Vincent’s Hospice is a local charity Hospice at the heart of the community, providing specialist care for those affected by life limiting conditions in Renfrewshire. Every year, Strictly Come Prancing generates thousands of pounds in essential revenue to provide this vital support for people across the community going through some of the hardest times of their lives.

Director of Income Generation for the Hospice, Jackie Young, said: “Strictly Come Prancing is the biggest event on our fundraising calendar, with couples and dance partners coming together in front of hundreds of supporters and sponsors every year, to find out who will be crowned the Strictly Champions.

“With the current pandemic, we have no way of knowing what will be allowed in March: so we are currently working on plans A, B, C and D to make sure that we are able to go ahead in some format. Currently this has involved discussions with venues of limited numbers, doing it across multiple nights, all the way to a live streamed online event. Whatever it takes, to keep everyone involved safe and keep everyone dancing!

“What we do know, is that we need volunteers to sign up and be our dance couples for 2021! So, if you are from the same household or extended household, and want to get involved, learn how to dance, have fun and help out a great cause, we want to hear from you!”

Couples who sign up will undergo dance training from experienced choreographers to make sure they are ready to go on the big night in a way that matches their skill level and is sure to wow the judges. All training will be carried out in line with government guidelines to ensure everyone is safe.

Jackie added: “This event is open to everyone, with former champions including an 81 year old dancing the tango, so please support St. Vincent’s Hospice and get in touch to find out more.”

To learn more, sign up, or speak to the Fundraising Team call 01505 705 635 or email Info@svh.co.uk.

Spitfire for NHS Scotland

A World War II plane which began flying around the UK during the Clap for Carers campaign while the country was in lockdown, flew over Scotland on Thursday 17th September and hundreds of Paisley Buddies got to see the War Time Plane with its Thank U NHS emblazoned on the bottom of the plane as it flew from hospital to hospital around the country.

The Spitfire is incredibly popular and is now aiming to take its tribute to the NHS even further with the team behind it and has now had to handwrite 80,000 names onto the jet’s blue paintwork.

It flew from Dykebar Hospital to the RAH at around 14:15 and lots of pictures and videos can be seen on our Facebook group.

Here are just some of the pictures taken by Allen Mclaughlin 

Coats Memorial Spitfire for NHS Scotland

Coats Memorial with the Spitfire doing a flypast

Spitfire for NHS Scotland

Spitfire with Thank U NHS and the names of hundreds of people written on the fuselage for charity.

Video of the Spitfire Taken by Paul Mothersole:

Clyde walkway after being tidied

Volunteers are making it a Spotless September in Renfrewshire after more than 250 bags of litter were collected in the first two weeks.

Clyde walkway after being tidied

Hundreds of volunteers have taken part in an incredible 75 litter picks so far as inspired individuals and community groups do their bit to make their local community cleaner and brighter.

Litter picks have taken place all across Renfrewshire, including Erskine, Renfrew, Paisley, Johnstone, Linwood, Bishopton, Houston and Bridge of Weir.

Marion McDonald and her two children, Matthew (11) and Ivy (6), from Toddle Tots

Local volunteers have been provided by the Renfrewshire Council with sanitised litter pickers and equipment to take part in their litter picks, as well as information on how to stay safe during the Covid-19 pandemic while litter picking, and the council’s StreetScene team have collected each bag of litter afterwards too.

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Councillor Cathy McEwan, Convener of Renfrewshire Council’s Infrastructure, Land and Environment Policy Board, said: “It’s incredible how devoted our volunteers are and their dedication to keeping their community clean continues to amaze me.

“We are all working together to not only make where we live cleaner and brighter, but also to change the behaviour of those who think it’s okay to drop litter.

Cllr Cathy McEwan

“The Team Up to Clean Up campaign has created a community of local people who want to make a difference and, slowly but surely, we will make real environmental change here in Renfrewshire.

“I’ve been out litter picking as part of Spotless September and I can’t wait to get out again. Please come join me and hundreds of others as we work hard to make Renfrewshire a nicer place to live, work and visit.”

The award-winning Team Up to Clean Up campaign sees the council and community join together to carry out enhanced cleaning of Renfrewshire’s local environment, with additional road sweeping, litter picking, and gully cleaning assisted by the local community’s litter picks.

For more information, and to find out how to take part, visit www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/SpotlessSeptember.

44227 Renfrewshire Chamber of Commerce - Webinar Graphics - Transform Digital

TRANSFORM: Helping you navigate the post-Covid business environment. 

Funded and developed by Renfrewshire Chamber our TRANSFORM programme is designed to help you adapt and transition to the new business environment post-COVID. With online training and support in key areas including Leadership, Strategy, Digital, Green Recovery and Wellbeing. TRANSFORM is free to join and delivered between August 2020-Feb 2021. Places are limited to max 20 for each discipline. Please contact the team to register your interest now. 

44227 Renfrewshire Chamber of Commerce - Webinar Graphics - Transform Green Recovery

TRANSFORM: Green Recovery with leading environmental consultants Mabbett

Session 1: 15 Sept 2020 10am-11am Title: What’s the fuss about “net zero” emissions?

  • Background to Scottish government goals and targets – net zero emissions by 2045.
  • Strategic planning and what this means for companies both large and small.
  • Current help available for companies
  • A consideration of your own company’s current status on net zero emissions planning
  • One action to take away.

Session 2: 22 Sept 2020 10am-11am Title: What SME’s can do to reduce emissions and save money

Session 3: 29 Sept 2020 10am-11am Title: Your Net Zero Emissions by 2045 Strategy – Opportunities”

 

Contact Jill Carrino jcarrino@renfrewshirechamber.com 07702 9090474

44227 Renfrewshire Chamber of Commerce - Webinar Graphics - Transform Wellbeing

TRANSFORM: Mental Health & Wellbeing with Brian Costello – Headstrong  

As we return to work Mental Health has been pushed to the front of many of our agendas.  Whether it be for our colleagues, for ourselves or, in many cases, both, it is imperative that business leaders understand the modern Mental Health landscape to create success.

The good news is that’s not as difficult as it may initially seem.

In these sessions HeadStrong’s Brian Costello will give us an insight into everyone else’s minds by helping us understand our own.  Brian will give us some key understandings over these 3 fascinating sessions

Session 1) Wednesday 30th September 12-1.15pm
Session 2) Wednesday 7th October 12-1.15pm
Session 3) Wednesday 14th October 12-1.15pm

Contact Jill Carrino jcarrino@renfrewshirechamber.com 07702 9090474

TRANSFORM: Leadership for Today: mapping your journey in an ever-changing world. With John Armstrong – On Track Training & Coaching.

The arrival of Covid-19 has had an enormous impact globally and as lockdown restrictions ease, a “new normality” is starting to be established.  So, what does this mean for leadership at work today?  This programme will create an opportunity, for those leaders attending, to reflect on their experiences and learning so far and to map their own journey and their future in an ever-changing world.  The three themes chosen highlight areas where leaders might be able to impact positively on their people and organisation.

  • Thursday 22nd October 2020 12pm-1.15pm The Adaptive Leader
  • Thursday 29th October 2020 12pm-1.15pm The Caring Leader
  • Thursday 5th November 2020 12pm-1.5pm The Resilient Leader

 

Contact Bob Grant bgrant@renfrewshirechamber.com 07702 909476 

44227 Renfrewshire Chamber of Commerce - Webinar Graphics - Transform Digital

TRANSFORM: Digital with Gary Ennis from NSDesign

Attendees will learn how best to use Facebook, Twitter & Linkedin to help market their organisation and engage with customers. Digital marketing will also be covered including use of video, email & blogging. A great opportunity for Chamber members to learn from the best. Gary is an award-winning digital marketer – and NSDesign is a well-established and respected company in this field

Session 1) Tuesday 22nd September 10am-12pm
Session 2) Tuesday 29th September 10am-12pm
Session 3) Friday 9th October 10am-12pm

Contact Jill Carrino jcarrino@renfrewshirechamber.com 07702 9090474

44227 Renfrewshire Chamber of Commerce - Webinar Graphics - Transform Leadership

TRANSFORM:Strategy – Fit 4 Business (The R-series) with John Leburn – Exponentiate.uk

RESILIENCE (n): the capacity to absorb energy from disruption

Has the COVID-19 pandemic had a dramatic impact on your business? Struggling to make sense of it all? Are you looking for some simple guidance in a business world that seems to have turned upside down?

Join our 3-part TRANSFORM:Strategy series designed to help you step back and review how the recent disruption caused by COVID-19 has impacted your business and its future prospects. John Leburn, a Principal Consultant from Exponentiate.uk, will take you through 6 simple (easy to implement) fixes that can often be the difference between success and failure

Session 1) Tuesday 25th August 9am-10.15am

Session 2) Tuesday 8th September, 9am-10.15am

Session 3) Tuesday 15thth September, 9am-10.15am

 

*new dates to be announced shortly* 

 

Contact Stuart Murray smurray@renfrewshirechamber.com 07525 323500

Ben

Bailey’s Antiques recently opened on Paisley High Street, and in the lead up to its opening, their window displays caught my eye. I love a browse of unique items and artwork, which Bailey’s Antiques have in abundance. I had a chat with owner Ben Bailey about how the shop came about and all that goes on there, as well as what his plans are for its future. 

Ben

Can you start off by just telling us a bit about Bailey’s Antiques and how it came to be?

 

So, my name is Ben Bailey, hence where the name is from, and my grandad was into antiques and things like that, and my dad as well. My grandad passed away a couple of years ago so when it came to naming it I just thought that would be nice. I didn’t want it to sound big-headed but it was more a tribute to him and my dad, really. 

So I’ve been self-employed, buying and selling antiques for about six years or so. I’ve worked for a few auction houses and things, but decided to go self-employed, just because I wanted to work for myself. But I’d been selling online, mostly vintage and antique watches and jewellery, smaller things that I could post. And then, before lockdown, I came into the previous shop that was here, UpHub, and rented out a small space from them, one cabinet actually, just to sell some jewellery from. That went quite well so I rented out a bit more space, and in the end I had a good sized area that I was selling from and doing quite well. Then COVID hit and UpHub shut down unfortunately, but I really liked the idea of this place, not just because I was doing well selling things, but because it’s nice to be part of the community. My girlfriend works at the museum, we’ve just had a baby, so we’re quite settled here and I want to be part of Paisley. It’s really nice to be part of Paisley High Street especially. I ummed and ahhed for a long time and I just thought: ‘I’m just going to go for it.’ 

So I opened the shop myself and 80% of it will be me personally selling antique and vintage furniture and jewellery. And it isn’t all antiques, that word is a bit scary, as most people think that means it’s expensive but most of my stuff is vintage and quite affordable. There’s a few more expensive items downstairs but I don’t want it to be a snooty place, because I’m not very snooty. I’m quite messy and disorganised so I want it to be cluttered and interesting and for people to come in and have a look. We’re open now but we’re still kind of in the process with a lot of stuff to bring in. 

I’ve always wanted a shop, because it’s just a nice thing to do, especially now I’ve got a daughter, it’s nice to have a family thing. But, in the past I’ve worked with different charities and I did want to do something community based as well. So, I spoke with Business Gateway, across the road, and there’s something called the Creative Hub Grant. If you meet their requirements, they help you out financially, and their requirements were what I wanted to do anyway: I wanted to rent space to artists, I wanted to have workshops here, I wanted to have various different exhibitions. Through their grant, they subsidise my rent here for the first 18 months, so that’s really useful for me starting off; one, because it is a new business, two because it’s strange times due to the coronavirus, so I don’t know if I would’ve been able to do that without them, or I would’ve been too nervous to do it without them. 

baileys antiques downstairs retail

A lot of what I’ve been discussing has been about sustainability and supporting local businesses and creators, particularly during the current situation; this is clearly something at the heart of your business too. Can you talk a bit about that? 

 

So, most of the stuff downstairs in the shop is things I’m selling, but I also rent out space to different artists and other antique dealers. So that means we’ve got things like gift cards and prints, ceramics, plants, lots of different handmade things, as well as the antique and vintage stuff. Also, Feel The Groove, the record shop, who also shut down unfortunately, they’ve come in and helped us by bringing in their vinyl to sell as well, which is already downstairs. The downstairs space is a retail space, but we’re also looking at having different things going on, for example life-drawing classes, and there’s a group on Instagram called Picturing Paisley, who are a group of amateur photographers who’ll also have an exhibition space downstairs too. Currently we’ve got an artist in the window exhibition space, Ryan King. I’m going to leave that window free to feature different artists each month or so, and I won’t charge them anything for that, I’ll just maybe take a commission if they do sell something. I really want it to be a creative space.

And then upstairs I’m having artists in to use the studio space to work from. We’ve got three previous Glasgow School of Art students who have not long graduated and were looking for space, and Glasgow’s really expensive. I think people get put off by Paisley because it’s a bit further out or, I’m not sure why, but everyone who’s come has enjoyed using this space. Paisley High Street feels nice, there’s a lot going on now.

Also, Ania, who owned the previous place UpHub, now rents space from me for her upcycling business, Little Bird’s Restoration and Upcycling. We have Mark, a photographer who uses the space, we’ve got current Glasgow School of Art students coming to use the space soon, and an older gentleman who is going to rent the studio space soon as well. So it’s great, we have a good mix of people, a mix of ages and backgrounds. It’s great to have it be a local hub for Paisley but I wouldn’t want to exclude people coming to use the space from elsewhere as well. I want it to be an inclusive place, I want it to be somewhere people can come and chill out. I’ve called the shop Bailey’s Antiques, but it’s more than that really, I don’t mind if people come and chat, or if people want to come and use a desk for a day, that’s fine. I think also because UpHub gave me an opportunity by letting me rent a bit of space from them, which has led to this obviously, I’m quite indebted and grateful to them, and I’d like to do the same for other people. I’m really flexible, I just want this place to grow, in any direction really, I’m sure not all my plans will work and I’m sure things I haven’t planned will happen too, and I’m looking forward to that. 

In terms of sustainability, it’s funny, the antiques trade is really green, and sustainable, because you buy old things and sell old things, so there’s zero waste, I don’t throw anything away, I don’t buy anything new. So it’s one of the oldest green industries there is, but it never ever sells itself that way, but it should do really. It’s basically recycling, isn’t it?

baileys antiques upstairs studio space

You were talking about using Bailey’s Antiques as a community hub, and it seems there’s quite a few places doing that around here recently, and it’s quite a good thing to see. How are you looking to expand on that?

 

It feels great, yeah. And I really want to link up with all the other businesses as well. I know that ReMode across the road, and Mill Magazine are doing a fashion show or something along those lines, and they were talking about using this as a venue for it as it’s a bit bigger than their place. I’ve spoken with Shelter next door, the charity shop, as sometimes they’ll get more expensive things in that maybe won’t sell in a charity shop, but I might be able to sell them in here. I wouldn’t take a cut there because it’s a charity of course, but I’m trying to link up to get that sense of community. I really like Paisley, I’m obviously not from Paisley but it reminds me a lot of home as I’m from a similar sized place in England, that used to have a rich industrial heritage and then kind of died a bit, sadly. Paisley, after going for City of Culture, although they didn’t get it, did get funding off the back of that of course, and the museum will be great when it reopens as well, which I think will busy up this end of the High Street again. There’s so much history attached to Paisley, but also it seems there’s so many artists and creatives and musicians, and it would be really nice for me to be part of that. I did do some work with Roar, the charity on Glasgow Road, and they do history groups so I’m looking to link up with them as we sell lots of historical items. There’s a lady who’s a storyteller and she’s going to just come in and pick up an item and tell a story about it. 

One of my biggest aims and dreams, which I’m going to try and do in a few months, once I’ve settled in, is to have an auction here. I think to bring an auction house back to Paisley would be really nice, as I used to work in auction houses, so I’ve got a bit of experience. I thought what I would do initially is maybe have a valuation day, an Antiques Roadshow kind of day, where people would bring things in and I would just tell them what they’re worth, just for a bit of fun. And then, if that goes well, I’d maybe organise another one, with a mind to sell the things at auction. I’ve got to learn not to get ahead of myself though! 

baileys antiques upstairs studio space

How have you found the first week of being open on Paisley’s High Street?

It’s been great, everyone who’s come in has been really positive as well, and I’ve been pleased with how it’s going so far. I’ve had people reaching out through social media and I don’t usually use it a lot, I’m a bit old, but Instagram especially has been really good for connecting with people and getting great feedback. People have come in and asked if it’s okay to look around and the answer is always yes, browsers are always welcome. I want to be a friendly business. I think in these times especially, the High Street has suffered a bit, and there’s nothing wrong with hairdressers and vaping shops, but there’s loads of them, and I think there’s something to be said for having interesting shops on the High Street, and destination shops. If this becomes established as an antique shop or a vintage shop, people will travel to it, because I would. As someone who buys things to sell, I travel to Glasgow, Edinburgh, some smaller places, for these shops, so I’m hoping it can draw people in. Henderson Property, who are the landlords here, again I’m doing a shoutout, but they were keen for me to have it because they are invested in and care about Paisley’s development. They could’ve rented it five times to hairdressers or nail shops or vaping shops, and that’s fine, those shops are needed, but I think they were interested in having a kind of one-off shop; there isn’t anything like this on the High Street. Antique shops are usually in the middle of nowhere or in some backstreet in Glasgow or Edinburgh. 

 

Are you hoping then, that introducing a shop like this, which as you say there’s not much else like it nearby in Paisley, will spark an interest in antiques and such for the people who are here already?

 

I think so, and I hope so, and I think it seems to have done that. And it’s been a good age span as well, you get older people who can remember the stuff: ‘Oh I had one of these when I was a kid’ and then I’m going to start selling vintage clothing as well, because I like it, and there’s a university here as well and I don’t think we’ve tapped into that yet, we don’t see many students in here, for some reason, when it was the previous shop as well. So I’d like to tap into that market and sell stuff that captures their interest, like the vinyl and vintage clothes and vintage guitars. 

baileys antiques upstairs studio space

You touched on this earlier, but there’s kind of a strange paradox between people thinking second-hand stuff is all cheap and not great quality, and people thinking antique shops are just full of really expensive items; do you think you’ve found a good middle ground in what you’ve collated? And do you think that’s quite a challenge to combat those perceptions?

 

I think it definitely is a challenge, actually. I think you’re right. I come from a working class background, I used to go to lots of car boot sales and my grandad was a kind of Del Boy, but as I’ve grown and worked in auction houses and all that, I live quite a middle class life now, even though I’m like ‘I’m working class!’ So I myself would’ve been nervous to go into some places, and I hate that feeling, feeling like you don’t belong somewhere. We live in a time where unfortunately there’s lots of different issues that people face; particularly race, but also gender, sexuality and things like that at the moment. Poverty is quite a big one as well, and I think that feeling of not quite belonging is a big problem there. So I definitely agree that it is a challenge and I really want this to be accessible to everyone, no matter how much money you’ve got, and I don’t want to put people off. I thought for a long time about what to name it, and I did name it ‘Bailey’s Antiques’, but it’s a lot more than that, and I’d say 50% of what I sell is vintage. I want to sell a things at a range or prices, from 50p upwards. 

I don’t want it to look like a junk shop at the same time. I don’t want to step on the toes of charity shops either. So it is hard, but the selling point of this place is me because I’m buying things that I like. If it works great, if it doesn’t, it’s my fault. I’m gambling on the fact that what I like, other people might like as well. I think with any small business you’re investing in the people who run it, because they’re creating the shop or cafe that they would like to come into, and that’s what I’m doing. I’ve got midcentury stuff that’s quite trendy at the moment, more industrial design pieces: filing cabinets, 80s stools.

I have got some more expensive items, but to me, my favourite thing in the world is buying something for £1 and selling it for £5. It’s great, I get more excitement out of that than spending £100 on something and selling it for £200 because it’s about rehoming things. I see something in an auction or a charity shop and it catches my eye, so I buy it and I maybe put it on Instagram or put it in the shop and make it look nice, and then whoever I’ve bought it from makes money, there’s a profit for me obviously and then it goes to a good home, or it goes to another dealer and they sell it again. There’s probably things I’ve sold that are worth more than I’ve sold them for, that happens. It is a fine line. I think I’ll learn as I go what sells and what doesn’t. I’m not stubborn enough to only sell things I love, of course I’ll bend to what people ask for, but I do think with small businesses, you’re investing in the person. 

baileys antiques upstairs studio space

Anything else you’d like to say to potential new customers?

 

We’re friendly, everybody’s welcome, no matter how much money you’ve got, as I say the range of prices is 50p upwards. There’s a bit of everything here. Furniture, jewellery, books, music, clothing, pictures. Also, I’d love to have feedback from people, if there’s something you’re looking for, I can try and find it for you, if there’s something you want to do in the space, as long as it’s safe, we can try and do that too. As I mentioned, there’s a free exhibition space for artists, so if anyone wants to hold an exhibition, get in touch, probably through the Bailey’s Antiques Instagram or Facebook page is the best way to do that. Just come in, say hello, introduce yourself and have a look around!

 

Bailey’s Antiques are currently open 10am-5pm Tuesday to Saturday at 34 High Street, Paisley. You can contact Ben on the Instagram page @baileys_antiques or on Facebook: Bailey’s Antiques.

Written by the talented Rachel Campbell:

“I’m Rachel and I’m a 20-year-old student studying English Literature and History. I’ve always enjoyed writing and after getting involved in the student newspaper during my time at university, I’ve found a real interest in journalism too. I’m looking to write positive stories about what is going on in Paisley, and help readers learn more about the businesses and activities that are so close by. I’m interested in sustainability and how we can support local businesses whilst also doing our bit for the planet. Along the way, I’ll hopefully write about a wide range of topics: music, fashion, theatre, art, health and wellbeing, and anything else that is happening in Paisley. I’d love for anyone to get in touch if they’re interested in having me write an article about their business/charity/event/activity. ”

Renfrewshire Heritage Centre

Renfrewshire Leisure says safety is the priority with measures including appointment-only entry and use of face coverings to protect visitors and staff

Renfrewshire’s popular Heritage Centre is reopening amid a surge of interest among people keen to learn more about their family history and community’s past.

Renfrewshire Heritage Centre3

The restart of on-site services on Thursday, September 17th, marks another stage in recovery from the coronavirus lockdown by the Centre’s operator, leisure and cultural charity Renfrewshire Leisure.

All visitors will be strictly required to pre-book their attendance and wear face coverings as part of health and social distancing measures being put in place to protect them and members of staff. Bookings can be made from today (Thursday, September 10th).

The Heritage Centre, temporarily located at the Abbey Mill Business Centre on Seedhill Road in Paisley as the £42m transformation of Paisley Museum continues, boasts an impressive collection of items and information which charts the stories of the people and places of Renfrewshire, from the earliest of times to the present day.

Renfrewshire

Its staff have been putting their expertise to strong use digitally during lockdown, supporting people with online research into the likes of family history and stories of the past from across Renfrewshire and expect the carefully managed return of physical services to be busy.

Christine McLean, Heritage Manager at Renfrewshire Leisure, said: “We’re looking forward to welcoming people back, albeit in a different way to that in which we’re used to, and helping them to use the great resources available at the centre, complementing the support we’ve been providing online and over the phone since March. Some of our team have 30 or 40 years’ experience so are a fantastic source of information themselves, as well as the fascinating resources we have.

“We’ve found that walks and the sights seen along the way during lockdown have inspired people to learn more about the history of the towns and villages in which they live – their built and social heritage. Lots of them have been getting in-touch to find out more information, as have those who have been using the time to explore their family history.”

Renfrewshire Heritage Centre3

To ensure that people can carry out their research in a safe and secure environment, coronavirus mitigation measures include:

  • An appointment-only entrance system. Bookings must be arranged in advance by emailing heritage@renfrewshire.gov.uk or by calling 0141 618 5375.
  • The discussion of research requirements ahead of arrival. Entrance will not be allowed without proof of pre-booking. 
  • Specific table allocation. Tables will be two metres apart. The resources required will be placed on these tables prior to arrival. No further items can be added during the visit.
  • Hand hygiene measures which protect both people and the items in the centre’s collection.
  • The quarantining of resources for 72 hours after every use.

For more details on arrangements at the Heritage Centre – or how all other Renfrewshire Leisure services are affected by Covid-19 and the protection measures in place at each venue – go to www.renfrewshireleisure.com/coronavirus

mile end mill

We asked our friends to create a beautiful video of the Mile End Mill at Seedhill Paisley and the Chimney that dominates the skyline. Sit back and enjoy what you won’t see from the ground.

mile end mill

 

Paisley Grammar High School

Fantastic view right around the Paisley Grammar Campus, soon to be (if planning has its way) moved to Renfrew Road and the Chivas building location.

Paisley Grammar High School

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