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Scottish Property Valuation Rolls for 1920 Go Online

Scottish Property Valuation Rolls for 1920 Go Online.

‘Homes fit for heroes’? New historical records offer a fascinating snapshot of Scottish society in the wake of the First World War

The names and addresses of more than 2.6 million people living in Scotland during the post-WW1 period will be published online at 10am on Monday 28 October, as records of Scottish properties in 1920 are released on ScotlandsPeople.gov.uk, the government’s family history website.

scotlandspeople_logoComprising over 76,000 digital images taken from 169 volumes, these new records – known as Valuation Rolls – cover every type of property in Scotland that was assessed as having a rateable value in 1920. As the records contain details for the owners and occupiers of properties, they will offer genealogists and historians fresh insight into Scottish society in 1920.

Each Valuation Roll entry on the website is fully searchable by name and address, with the records listing the names of owners, tenants and occupiers of each property – in many cases occupations are also included. As the Rolls include all types of property, from castles and mansions to crofts and tenements, in turn, the records also include people from across the whole social spectrum.

The Rolls also reveal some fascinating trends in Scotland’s social history at this time, such as the building of the first council housing estate, and the growth of urban allotments and gardens cultivated by working-class gardeners to achieve self-sufficiency. The Rolls also reveal the widespread disposal of land by owners who faced new tax and other burdens from 1918 onwards, and the opportunities for tenant farmers to buy their own farms.

Researchers at the National Records of Scotland have also been spotting celebrities (and family ancestors of famous people) in the records, and have highlighted entries for Muriel Spark’s father, Sir William Burrell, Sir Harry Lauder, Sir Matt Busby, Bill Shankly, Samuel Peploe and the great-grandparents of The Proclaimers. The researchers have even found a quirky entry for a cottage in Dunblane, named for a poem by Robert Tannahill, the contemporary of Burns.

Fiona Hyslop, Cabinet Secretary for Culture and External Affairs in the Scottish Government, said:

“ScotlandsPeople is a wonderful resource that enables Scots, those of Scottish descent and anyone with an interest in Scotland to discover more about our nation’s fascinating family and social history. The release of the Valuation Rolls for 1920 strengthens the digital tapestry of Scotland’s story that is available through Scotland’s national archive.”

Tim Ellis, Registrar General and Keeper of the Records of Scotland, said:

“The release of the Valuation Rolls for 1920 will be of enormous help for family and local history research, enabling people to discover ancestors and where and how they were living almost a decade after the Census of 1911. The newly-available records are part of the commitment by the National Records of Scotland to improve our service to the public and provide researchers with the resources that they need.”

Annelies van den Belt, the CEO of DC Thomson Family History (formerly known as brightsolid online publishing), who enable the ScotlandsPeople website on behalf of the National Records of Scotland, said:

“We’re very pleased to add this fourth set of Valuation Roll indexes and images to the ScotlandsPeople website – bringing the current total of index entries on the website to over 94 million. These new records will complement the 1895, 1905 and 1915 Valuation Rolls, which have been published over the past 20 months, and will also help family historians who are looking to fill in gaps after the 1911 Census.”

The 1920 Valuation Rolls will be available on the ScotlandsPeople website (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk), at the ScotlandsPeople Centre in Edinburgh, and at local family history centres in Glasgow, Kilmarnock, Hawick and Inverness.

Tannahill

“Jessie the Flower o’ Dunblane” – Jenny Tennant, the sweetheart and muse of Robert Tannahill

One of Scotland’s finest love songs is undoubtedly “Jessie, the Flower o’ Dunblane”. The words were composed by the famous weaver-poet, Robert Tannahill. On Tannahill’s untimely death in 1810 at the age of 36, a search began to identify the girl immortalised in the poem. Although there were many contenders, it is believed that the real ‘Jessie’ was Jenny Tennant.

Jessie/Jenny had in fact been Tannahill’s sweetheart and muse for some three years, yet the poet believed she had been unfaithful. Tannahill then composed another poem to Jessie, this time entitled ‘Farewell’.

Jessie/Jenny was born in Braeport, Dunblane. A cottage, erected in 1808 on the site of her birthplace, can still be seen.

In the Valuation Roll entry included below, it’s possible to see the title of the poem in the ‘Description’ column (line number 504). The description reads:

“Cottage site of Birthplace of ‘Jessie, the Flower of Dunblane’, Windyhill Cot.”

We think this is the only Valuation Roll entry for 1920 (or any other year) that contains the title of a poem.

Valuation Roll entry for “Jessie, the Flower o’ Dunblane” – VR113/66/592

The ScotlandsPeople Media Website

To download images and stories for the launch of the 1920 Valuation Rolls, as well as background information and statistics, visit the ScotlandsPeople Media Website:

– http://media.scotlandspeople.gov.uk

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Descendant of Scotland’s ‘Weaver Poet’ found by twitter.

Descendant of Scotland’s ‘Weaver Poet’ found by twitter.

A tweet about Robert Tannahill was the catalyst that helped a woman living in south-east England to

learn that she is a descendant of Scotland’s ‘Weaver Poet’.

 

Caroline Shelley, a scenic artist from Waterlooville, made the chance discovery through reading a

tweet on the ScotlandsPeople Twitter page.

 

Caroline was researching her family history on the ScotlandsPeople website and had found that her

4xgreat grandmother was a Tannahill from Paisley. She then visited ScotlandsPeople on Twitter and

saw a tweet about the famous poet, who came a generation after Robert Burns.

 

“It was fate!” Caroline said. “I’d just learned that my Scottish ancestors were called Tannahill,

but I’d never heard of Robert Tannahill, so the surname didn’t mean anything to me. But then I

visited the ScotlandsPeople Twitter page and the first tweet was about Robert Tannahill! I did some

more digging using parish records and found that my 4xgreat grandmother’s father, also called

Robert, was the poet’s cousin. I’m thrilled – connecting the dots like this is amazing! I’m hoping

to visit Robert Tannahill’s cottage in Paisley on a future visit to Scotland.”

 

Dee Williams, Head of the ScotlandsPeople Centre, said: “We’re delighted that Caroline has made this

connection with such an important figure in Scottish history and literature. Caroline’s online

journey to reach Robert Tannahill used BMD certificates, census papers and then parish records. So

it’s great to know that these documents helped Caroline with her ancestral jigsaw.”

 

With one poet now residing in “Poets’ Corner” of Caroline’s family tree, Ms Shelley is now hoping

that she might be related to other famous poets. “I haven’t found a connection to Percy Bysshe

Shelley yet”, Caroline said, “but would love to be related to both poets!”

www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk

 

The Tannahill Weavers In Concert

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The Robert Tannahill Federation

proudly presents

The Tannahill Weavers In Concert

“An especially eloquent mixture of the old and new.” – New York Times

“World class musicians with passion and a healthy sense of fun, keeping alive and making accessible the very heart of the tradition itself.” – Mojo Magazine

“…as close to perfect as it gets in an imperfect world.” – Sing Out!

Paisley Arts Centre, New Street, Paisley

Friday 21st May 2010

Show starts 8pm

Tickets: £10 (£8 Conc.)

On sale from Monday 11th January

Paisley Arts Centre Booking Office:

Tel. 0141 887 1010

Or find out more information from the bands website here http://www.roberttannahillfederation.com/1.html

Text below taken from http://www.paisley.org.uk/famous_people/robert_tannahill.php

Robert Tannahill (1774-1810)

Paisley’s weaver poet born in Castle Street, son of a well-respected ‘bien’ weaver to whom Robert was apprenticed in 1786. Described by a contemporary as the ‘prettiest shuttler’ he had ever seen, Robert had a wee box on his loom-post for jotting down his ideas.

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Tannahill Anniversary

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Events planned to mark death of poet Tannahill: BBC link

A Scottish poet who killed himself after being rejected by a publisher is to be remembered on the 200th anniversary of his death.
Robert Tannahill, also known as the Weaver Poet, was once viewed as being almost comparable to Burns.
The centenary of his death saw 15,000 people head to Paisley’s Gleniffer Braes, one of his favourite spots, to listen to his songs. It is hoped that Paisley buddies and poetry lovers will again turn out in force to pay tribute to the poet.
New CDs of Tannahill’s work are being released, concerts are being put on and a series of events will take place in May, including walks, talks and a play.
Tannahill was born in 1774 to a weaving family but showed a talent for writing poetry. His song Braes o’ Balquhidder is thought to be the basis for the famous folk song Wild Mountain Thyme.
Valerie Reilly, from Paisley Museum, said Tannahill was inspired by the beauty of nature. read more ..

Discuss this topic on the message board.

Link to Tannahill in Paisley History section.

Link to Tannahill in Famous people from Paisley section.

Medals for all.

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This information is taken from the website www.medals4all.com

Join us in our campaign for equal recognition for all the civilian heroes of the Glasgow Airport terror attack.

On Saturday 30th June 2007 a burning jeep crashed into the terminal building at Glasgow Airport.  Several members of the public intervened to subdue and apprehend the two would-be suicide bombers.  Their brave and gallant actions saved the lives of hundreds of holidaymakers and airport workers.

One of those men, John Smeaton, gave an unforgettable interview at the airport within hours of the attack.  His down-to-earth rendition of the events struck a cord with shocked viewers all over the world and won over millions of fans.  In the past six months he has received a great deal of publicity and is soon to be awarded the Queens Gallantry Medal.

It is very important that such brave actions are recognised accordingly.  Members of the public who act selflessly to protect others and intervene in extremely dangerous circumstances deserve commendations.

Unfortunately, the other civilians who stepped in to thwart the attack have been omitted from the Queens Gallantry List.  They are Alex McIlveen, Michael Kerr and Stephen Clarkson.  Their actions were by no means inferior to those of John Smeaton.  They all played their part in preventing the terrorists from carrying out their atrocities, and they should all be recognised for their brave and gallant actions.

Read more