Glasgow Airport, as most other airports in UK, saw a massive increase of the passengers passing through. We’re looking at record numbers here. 29 June was the busiest-ever June day, with 38,000 passengers going through the airport.

What does this mean for parents traveling with children? We’re looking at a very busy environment that may trigger anxiety for your kid. Maybe your kid doesn’t suffer from social anxiety and you’re not worried, but you should know that extreme crowds can be overwhelming nevertheless. It’s important for you to stay calm and make your kid feel as secure as possible.

Fortunately, Glasgow airport provides an adequate environment for that. Instead of going unprepared and wondering what to do while you’re waiting, you can simply go through this guide and save yourself and your kid from loads of stress.

 

  • Keep the Babycare Facilities to Mind

 

If you need to change your baby and you’d like some privacy during the process, you can get it at Glasgow Airport. You’ll find several baby-changing areas, and all of them are clearly indicated at the airport’s website.

No matter where you are at the moment, you can easily locate such a facility nearby, without the need to change floors or walk too far.

 

  • If You Have More Time, Benefit from the Play Area

 

You’ll find puzzle tables on different locations at the airport, so you can easily entertain your kid while waiting. If you want real entertainment, however, it’s smart to go to the children’s play area. The Kids Zone, located right after gate 27 on the west pier, is a soft play area that’s free of charge.

When you allow your kid to have fun while waiting, they won’t perceive the flight as something scary. Plus, play will get them a bit tired, so they will be ready for a nap as soon as they get on the plane.

 

  • Feel Free to Eat at a Restaurant

 

Glasgow Airport gives you plenty of restaurants and bars to choose from. Most of them will offer high chairs for your kids, as well as kid-friendly menus. If you need to heat your own baby food or milk, just ask for hot water from the catering outlets and they will provide it for you.

From personal experience, it’s extremely important to get some comfort while eating at an airport. I was transiting through Glasgow Airport and I had three hours to spend there, so a restaurant was definitely on the menu. I picked a random one, asked for a high chair, fed the kid, and did my thing writing for a book reviews service while she was taking a nap.

We managed to get a lot out of those three hours, and the comfortable setting made that possible. I recommend planning this part of your trip way ahead. Glasgow Airport gives you a clear list of restaurants and bars at its website, so it’s easy to make a choice beforehand.

 

  • Bring a Small, Easily Portable Stroller

 

The umbrella-style, fully collapsible stroller is the perfect choice for traveling with your kid. But it’s quite difficult to fold it on your own if you’re traveling alone and you have to hold the baby while doing that. So make sure to get a really light stroller that you can fold and unfold with one hand.

You’re allowed to take a small foldable stroller with you on the plane, but make sure to inform yourself about the dimensions. Different airlines have different rules. Keep in mind that if it goes over dimensions, the foldable stroller will replace the child’s hand baggage allowance.

As for the car seat, it depends on the carrier. Most flights that leave the UK allow adults to hold children in their lap, if they are up to two years of age. But this is not the safest option, given the fact that turbulence can come out of the blue. It’s important to check the guidelines by the airline and see if you can reserve a seat with a carrycot position.

 

Traveling with children is never easy. You worry about their safety and comfort, and you constantly get mean looks from the other passengers. Glasgow Airport makes the experience as convenient as possible for you. It’s important to know your options and organize your transit before you get there.

Authors Bio:
Mary Whitman is a freelance writer and freelancer based in Adelaide, South Australia. In her spare time, she enjoys talking about Sustainable Development and Art.