£2m boost for plans to restore Russell Institute.

Plans to restore one of Paisley’s architectural treasures to its former glory are taking a giant leap forward after Renfrewshire Council secured a £2million funding windfall.

The Russell Institute is one of the town’s most striking landmarks – but the former health centre is lying empty and needs work to be brought back into use.

The council has been working with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde on a plan to save the building, with the health board having gifted the Institute for the good of the community.

An organisation has been lined up to move in if funding to help pay for the revamp could be secured.

And a £2m application to the Scottish Government’s Regeneration Capital Grant Fund has now been given the green light.

Work to make the 1,750 sq m interior of the building suitable for modern office use is expected to take around two years, and could begin in summer 2014.

Renfrewshire Council Leader Mark Macmillan said: “Paisley’s stunning architectural heritage is one of the greatest features of the town.

“The Russell Institute is a magnificent building and a recognisable town centre landmark, and we are delighted to be able to help bring it back into use.

“This project will also bring significant economic and social benefits, by creating new jobs and allowing us to keep existing ones in the town centre, in addition to the jobs created during construction.

“This is just the latest stage in our continuing effort to make the best of the area’s built heritage, including the major revamp of Paisley Town Hall earlier this year.

“Plus, the £3.5m Townscape Heritage Initiative has seen major improvements to the Causeyside Street area, including restoration work on the Arts Centre.”

The council has been working with the Paisley Development Trust – a local group of volunteers dedicated to the regeneration of the town.

They initially commissioned a feasibility study into the building, which formed the basis for the grant application.

The trust’s chair Piero Pieraccini said: “This is fantastic news for the town and I am delighted to hear this money has been secured.

“This is a fantastic building which could have been left empty but this money will allow it to be brought back to life.”

The Category A-listed Russell Institute sits on the corner of New Street and Causeyside Street and was opened in 1927.

It was gifted to Paisley Burgh by Miss Agnes Russell, who wanted it to be used as a child welfare clinic as a memorial to her two brothers.

The building is notable for the distinctive bronze and stone sculptures on the exterior walls, and was used as a health centre until it closed in 2011.

Find out more by visiting the Paisley Development Trust Website.

PillarGallery

15 Best places to visit in Paisley.

I asked the question to members of our Facebook Community recently “Where are the best places to visit in Paisley or where is the best place to go?” We had a fabulous response and some I would not have even thought of, I will thank everyone personally at the bottom of this page.

PillarGallery

I am sure even if you live and work in the town you have been to a few of the places listed below, if you have your own favourite and its not listed then please use the comments form at the bottom of the page to add your very own..

  1. Paisley Museum & Art Gallery – The memory of the interior is a big draw for many as it holds a special place in peoples’ thoughts, so shows how much an impact it can make.
  2. Barshaw Park – The serenity of sitting on one of the benches watching the world go by and having a great view of Paisley’s landscape. You can take it easy or use the outdoor gym, there is also a hidden garden which is a real Paisley treasure and often overlooked.
  3. Saucel Hill – Sitting at the top of this hill, which is close to the hustle and bustle of the busy life in town makes it seem a million miles away.
  4. Glennifer Braes Country Park – Its a hit with many visitors, the beauty of living in Scotland is you can be in the countryside within 5 minutes and with stunning views of the town and quiet peaceful soundings this place helps most people gather their thoughts for the day.
  5. Oakshaw area of Paisley – This historic area is abundant in fascinating buildings and has a story around every corner, from Meetinghouse Lane, The Wynd, PACE Theatre, The High Church with its steeple and associated history, The Gaelic Chapel, Thomas Coats Observatory and the old school building of John Neilson makes Oakshaw a must visit.
  6. The Statues of Paisley – Paisley has many fascinating statues and each tells the story of a segment of the town’s history, from Paisley’s poet Robert Tannahill and The Coats brothers through to modern day Scouts statue and lots more. Don’t miss Witherspoon’s statue at the front of The University of the West of Scotland and also our glorious Cenotaph right in the centre of town.
  7. The Sma’ Shot cottages – This really is a place where you can walk through Paisley’s history and also meet some fascinating people. There is so much to see, from the original looms and the cottage set up as a museum of the time, to a relaxing cup of tea from a china cup in the café.
  8. Thomas Coats Observatory – Look outwards towards the universe of which Paisley is of course the centre. This place is astronomical!
  9. Paisley Town Hall – Paisley’s magnificent Town Hall has recently been refurbished outside and in for the recent visit of the Royal National Mod. You will find helpful information about the town at the main desk, lovely events space and a great venue for any kind of party, of course being Scottish we need no excuse.
  10. Paisley Abbey – Parts of the Abbey date back to 1163 when it was a Cluniac Monastery, it has been frequented by many Scottish Kings. William Wallace was educated here. This is the most prominent building on this list and it is rightly so, this is a must visit.
  11. Anchor Mills – Right next to the Hamills waterfall on the River Cart which flows right past this building. This now renovated building is the least visited of all our places due to it being a business centre and private housing, this is usually only open to the public once a year on Doors Open Day, with the beautiful atrium being the main attraction.
  12. The Hamills Waterfall – Mentioned above, this is a place so close to the town centre with many fishermen trying their luck in a now healthy river. This is an excellent place for photographs and some peace and quiet.
  13. Town Centre Walk – Follow the Heritage trail and you will be guided around most of the buildings and statues of the town, information on this can be had from the Town Hall.
  14. Woodside Cemetery – The resting place for many of our ancestors, the walk around the cemetery is likely to be an informative look at the stories of people who are now at peace. The Beild is just as you enter the cemetery and is home to the 7th Paisley Scouts in their newly refurbished centre.
  15. Thomas Coats Memorial Church – The Baptist Cathedral of Europe also features on our list of favourites and when you see this Gothic Style building you will see just why. If you know someone who studied at Paisley’s University then they probably had their graduation ceremony here, making this another jewel in Paisley’s visitor attractions.

 

When asking for this information from our members one of the group Stuart Duffy, who is a local photographer, posted the following statement which I found fascinating and is actually why I started taking interest in the town to begin with.

Stuart says “Paisley: An enormous resource for photographers

No matter your main hook in photography, Paisley presents itself to you as a golden place to spend a day.

Street: Street Photographers will find the “Buddie” a fantastic subject, they are honest and earthy. They are also more approachable than their cousins in other towns and cities, and in Paisley Town Centre there is a backdrop of historical buildings nestled in the architectural mistakes of the 70’s which are being removed/upgraded. Which leads me into …

Architectural: You could spend a day without having to travel more than a mile from the train station and have a months’ work at the end of the day. Cobblestone roads and paths, architecture running from the early 19th century and an Abbey that is not just old, open and friendly, they are positively welcoming.
Take a trip up the hill and pass the Coats Observatory, graveyards and roads and paths that easily let you experience Victoriana

Nature and Wildlife: I have spent a day in Barshaw Park, regardless of the season, but if you travel further afield you have wide open spaces and wild woods to allow you to capture natural wildlife.

Fashion/Social/Portraiture: There are amazing backdrops, panoramic views and cubbyholes where you can really make the session pop… within 15 minutes walk you can go from a waterfall to an ancient building and on to a leafy avenue.

Best of all, its friendly, it’s greatest asset is that the people of Paisley are friendly … oh, and you are normally only 10 minutes from coffee and cake.

When you leave by train, you might want to give yourself some time… Paisley Gilmour Street Station is worth some time!”

I hope that you have found this list helpful and the next time you are in town you will think differently and visit one of these fascinating places.

You can find more paisley Visitor Attractions listed on our Visitor Attraction Section.

Thanks to: Betty McLatchie, Nic Armstrong, Catherine Steel, Aileen Wilson, Anne McNair, Lynsey Moore, James Murray, Robert Smith, Lyndsay Cameron, David McLean, Andy Campbell, John McCue, William Robertson, Stuart Duffy, Mags MacGee, Scott Manson, Margaret Blair and Roddy Boyd.

Observations on a Colony of Adders, Slow-worms and Common Lizards on Loch Lomondside.

Paisley Natural History Society is continuing its autumn programme of evening talks with an illustrated talk by Chris McInerny, University of Glasgow on Thursday 7 November at 7.30pm in Paisley Museum.

'Red Squirrel' by Mike CruiseA colony of reptiles on the east shore of Loch Lomond was monitored intensively during 2012 to understand population numbers, distribution, movements and biology throughout the year. Large numbers of European Adder, Vipera berus, Slow-worm Anguis fragilis and Common Lizard Zootoca vivipara were found. This talk will describe these observations and outline an environmental mitigation plan for a proposed hydroelectric scheme for this site.

So if you’re interested in Scotland’s native reptiles and want to find out more about the species and the challenges face by new developments and proposals, this is the talk for you.

This talk is free and open to everyone, just come along.

www.paisleynaturalhistorysociety.org.uk

Scottish Property Valuation Rolls for 1920 Go Online.

‘Homes fit for heroes’? New historical records offer a fascinating snapshot of Scottish society in the wake of the First World War

The names and addresses of more than 2.6 million people living in Scotland during the post-WW1 period will be published online at 10am on Monday 28 October, as records of Scottish properties in 1920 are released on ScotlandsPeople.gov.uk, the government’s family history website.

scotlandspeople_logoComprising over 76,000 digital images taken from 169 volumes, these new records – known as Valuation Rolls – cover every type of property in Scotland that was assessed as having a rateable value in 1920. As the records contain details for the owners and occupiers of properties, they will offer genealogists and historians fresh insight into Scottish society in 1920.

Each Valuation Roll entry on the website is fully searchable by name and address, with the records listing the names of owners, tenants and occupiers of each property – in many cases occupations are also included. As the Rolls include all types of property, from castles and mansions to crofts and tenements, in turn, the records also include people from across the whole social spectrum.

The Rolls also reveal some fascinating trends in Scotland’s social history at this time, such as the building of the first council housing estate, and the growth of urban allotments and gardens cultivated by working-class gardeners to achieve self-sufficiency. The Rolls also reveal the widespread disposal of land by owners who faced new tax and other burdens from 1918 onwards, and the opportunities for tenant farmers to buy their own farms.

Researchers at the National Records of Scotland have also been spotting celebrities (and family ancestors of famous people) in the records, and have highlighted entries for Muriel Spark’s father, Sir William Burrell, Sir Harry Lauder, Sir Matt Busby, Bill Shankly, Samuel Peploe and the great-grandparents of The Proclaimers. The researchers have even found a quirky entry for a cottage in Dunblane, named for a poem by Robert Tannahill, the contemporary of Burns.

Fiona Hyslop, Cabinet Secretary for Culture and External Affairs in the Scottish Government, said:

“ScotlandsPeople is a wonderful resource that enables Scots, those of Scottish descent and anyone with an interest in Scotland to discover more about our nation’s fascinating family and social history. The release of the Valuation Rolls for 1920 strengthens the digital tapestry of Scotland’s story that is available through Scotland’s national archive.”

Tim Ellis, Registrar General and Keeper of the Records of Scotland, said:

“The release of the Valuation Rolls for 1920 will be of enormous help for family and local history research, enabling people to discover ancestors and where and how they were living almost a decade after the Census of 1911. The newly-available records are part of the commitment by the National Records of Scotland to improve our service to the public and provide researchers with the resources that they need.”

Annelies van den Belt, the CEO of DC Thomson Family History (formerly known as brightsolid online publishing), who enable the ScotlandsPeople website on behalf of the National Records of Scotland, said:

“We’re very pleased to add this fourth set of Valuation Roll indexes and images to the ScotlandsPeople website – bringing the current total of index entries on the website to over 94 million. These new records will complement the 1895, 1905 and 1915 Valuation Rolls, which have been published over the past 20 months, and will also help family historians who are looking to fill in gaps after the 1911 Census.”

The 1920 Valuation Rolls will be available on the ScotlandsPeople website (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk), at the ScotlandsPeople Centre in Edinburgh, and at local family history centres in Glasgow, Kilmarnock, Hawick and Inverness.

Tannahill

“Jessie the Flower o’ Dunblane” – Jenny Tennant, the sweetheart and muse of Robert Tannahill

One of Scotland’s finest love songs is undoubtedly “Jessie, the Flower o’ Dunblane”. The words were composed by the famous weaver-poet, Robert Tannahill. On Tannahill’s untimely death in 1810 at the age of 36, a search began to identify the girl immortalised in the poem. Although there were many contenders, it is believed that the real ‘Jessie’ was Jenny Tennant.

Jessie/Jenny had in fact been Tannahill’s sweetheart and muse for some three years, yet the poet believed she had been unfaithful. Tannahill then composed another poem to Jessie, this time entitled ‘Farewell’.

Jessie/Jenny was born in Braeport, Dunblane. A cottage, erected in 1808 on the site of her birthplace, can still be seen.

In the Valuation Roll entry included below, it’s possible to see the title of the poem in the ‘Description’ column (line number 504). The description reads:

“Cottage site of Birthplace of ‘Jessie, the Flower of Dunblane’, Windyhill Cot.”

We think this is the only Valuation Roll entry for 1920 (or any other year) that contains the title of a poem.

Valuation Roll entry for “Jessie, the Flower o’ Dunblane” – VR113/66/592

The ScotlandsPeople Media Website

To download images and stories for the launch of the 1920 Valuation Rolls, as well as background information and statistics, visit the ScotlandsPeople Media Website:

– http://media.scotlandspeople.gov.uk

russell institute

Progress in the bid to restore the iconic Russell Institute building.

Bid to restore iconic building making progress

Renfrewshire Council is making progress in its efforts to bring one of Paisley’s architectural gems back to life.

The iconic Russell Institute building has been put up for sale by its owners, the NHS, but needs substantial work.

Renfrewshire Council has been working with the Paisley Development Trust, a group of local volunteers dedicated to the regeneration of the town, to find a tenant.

russell institute

An organisation has been lined up to move into the former health centre – but the deal is conditional on funding being secured to pay for the restoration work.

The council has applied for a Scottish Government regeneration grant to meet a chunk of the cost – and bosses will hear soon if they have been successful.

Renfrewshire Council Leader Mark Macmillan said: “The Russell Institute is an iconic site in the centre of Paisley but sadly it is in need of investment.

“We have an understanding with the NHS where – if we can help secure a tenant – the health service will dispose of the building.

“We are now waiting to hear whether the Scottish Government is willing to back the efforts of the community to bring this important building back into use.

“The council is determined to make use of the area’s superb architectural heritage – which has already been on show this month, having been commented on by many of the visitors we had for the Royal National Mòd.

“In terms of our wider efforts to make the most of the area’s built assets, this year has already seen Paisley Town Hall reopen after a major investment.

“We have also had the continuation of the Townscape Heritage Initiative, including public realm works in Causeyside Street and the restoration of Paisley Arts Centre.”

The Paisley Development Trust commissioned a feasibility study into the condition of the building, which formed the basis for the grant application.

Piero Pieraccini, the trust’s chair, added: “We would like to thank all the people who made a contribution to the funds for the feasibility study.

“We are delighted that there is a future for the building and hopefully we will be involved in that.”

The council is due to hear in November whether its stage-two application to the Scottish Government Regeneration Grant Fund has been successful. If not, other funding sources will be considered.

The Category A-listed Russell Institute sits on the corner of New Street and Causeyside Street and was opened in 1927.

It was gifted to Paisley Burgh by Miss Agnes Russell, who wanted it to be used as a child welfare clinic as a memorial to her two brothers.

The building is notable for the distinctive bronze and stone sculptures on the exterior walls, and was used as a health centre until it closed in 2011.

fountain gardens

Grand Fountain – Scottish Ironwork Seminar.

As part of the Grand Fountain: ‘Interpretation and Restoration’ project, a Scottish Ironwork Seminar, focussing on the Grand Fountain in Paisley and the Sun Foundry, Glasgow, is to be held on Tuesday 29th October in Paisley Town Hall.

The Grand Fountain project is funded by Historic Scotland, the Heritage Lottery Fund and Renfrewshire Council and will see the A listed cast iron fountain at the centre of Fountain Gardens, Paisley, restored to full working order by summer 2014.

fountain gardens

The seminar will provide information on the current restoration project and explain the architectural and historical context of the Grand Fountain.

The full programme is attached here:

Places at this event are free, but spaces are limited so must be reserved by contacting the project officer on 0141 618 4844 or emailing pt@renfrewshire.gov.uk.

Paisley Museum

Paisley Natural History Society Talks at Paisley Museum

Plants, the real silent witnesses

Paisley Natural History Society is continuing its autumn programme of evening talks with an illustrated talk by Dr Jennifer Miller (Director of the Dickson Forensic Bio-Archaeology Unit, Northlight Heritage) on Thursday the 3 October at 7.30pm in Paisley Museum.

Paisley Museum

Locard’s Principle states that every contact leaves a trace. When applied to fingerprints, drops of blood or firearms discharge, this concept is easily understood and recognised.  However, plants and soil surround us whenever we step outside our door, ready to adhere to clothing and tools; to shed traces into or grow through a clandestine grave. Forensic Botany now has an accepted role in criminal investigation. This presentation will outline the various ways in which plants contribute to the investigation of serious crime, giving case examples to help illustrate salient points.

The talk is free and open to everyone, just come along.

Paisley Natural History Society

Paisley Natural History Society was formed in the early 1970’s by local naturalists and is still going strong. The aims of the society are simple:

1. To encourage the study of natural history in Renfrewshire, East Renfrewshire and Inverclyde.

2. To support the conservation of wildlife and habitats; and

3. To maintain links with the Natural History department of Paisley Museum.

Regular indoor meetings are held in Paisley Museum on Thursday evenings during the winter months covering a variety of natural history topics from butterflies and birds to fungi and fossils and outings are organised during the summer months visiting sites throughout Scotland.

You don’t need to be a member to come along to the talks, they are open to anyone with an interest in natural history.

Copies of the winter talks programme can be obtained from Paisley Museum and the talks are also listed on the Renfrewshire Council website.

www.paisleynaturalhistorysociety.org.uk

Paisley Museum

Paisley Museum & Coats Observatory achieves Visit Scotland Award

Paisley Museum has recently been awarded a prestigious 4 star visitor attraction award after an assessment from Visit Scotland which revealed that the programme of positive change to improve visitor experiences developed by the staff on site has been hugely successful.

Over the past year the front of house team have been successful in implementing a series of improvements which have included; the introduction of a ‘welcome host’ on arrival at the Museum, new staff uniforms, an improved schedule of free Observatory tours that all staff are now trained to provide and the introduction of free ‘drop-in’ activities for families.

The team have been recognised for these efforts by Visit Scotland who upgraded the Museum & Observatory to a 4 star rated attraction as they not only scored the venue high on cleanliness, presentation of displays and the information available about the collections but also the welcome, attitude and efficiency of the staff.

Visitors who have not been to the venue recently will be treated to a reinvigorated Pillar Gallery, a bright and attractive museum shop with new products as well as regular tours and planetarium films for all the family.

Paisley Museum

From everyone at paisley.org.uk we would like to pass on our hearty congratulations on this achievement as we know the staff all work hard to promote the venues to a wider audience and the staff have been fantastic with us too.. All brilliant.. Well done… Brian…

 

Thomas Coats Observatory

Coats Observatory 130th Anniversary

Tuesday 1 October will mark the 130th anniversary of the opening of Coats Observatory. To commemorate this event the observatory will play host to an evening of astronomical-themed events.

Coats Observatory is Scotland’s oldest public observatory. A gift to the town from the Paisley Philosophical Institution and funded primarily by Thomas Coats of the Coats thread-manufacturing family, Coats Observatory first opened its doors to the public on the night of October the first, 1883. Coats Observatory was the first purpose-built observatory in Scotland which allowed members of the public access to a powerful telescope to see the wonders of the universe up close.

Thomas Coats Observatory

The building now operates as a visitor attraction and museum. During the day visitors can enjoy a guided tour around the building, taking in some of the fantastic Victorian-era scientific equipment once used to record earthquakes, the weather and observe the stars and take in the view from the balcony. In the winter months the observatory opens twice a week to keep up the tradition of allowing members of the public to look at the night sky through the telescope. If the weather is poor a state of the art digital planetarium provides a virtual tour of the cosmos without having to leave the comfort of your seat.

To celebrate its 130th anniversary Coats Observatory will open from 7pm to 10pm on Tuesday 1 October. Amongst the activities on offer will be planetarium films, guided tours, a talk on the history of the institution and, weather permitting, night sky viewing from 9pm – 10pm. If the weather prevents the use of the telescope planetarium shows will operate instead.

Admission to Coats Observatory is free, although places must be booked for the planetarium films as spaces are limited. Please call Paisley Museum on 0300 300 1210 to book. Films will operate at 7.30pm, 8pm and 8.30pm.

Entry to Coats Observatory that evening will be via 49 Oakshaw Street West, Paisley, PA1 2DR.

For any other information on the event, please contact Coats Observatory on 0141 618 5119.

For further information on Renfrewshire Arts & Museums’ events log on to www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/events or follow us on Facebook www.facebook.com/renfrewshirearts or Twitter @RenArtsMuseums.

A celebration of Gaelic Heritage and Culture at Paisley Museum

To coincide with the Royal National Mòd, Paisley Museum presents three exhibitions, collectively titled ‘A Celebration of Gaeldom’ running from 27 September to 27 October.

The exhibition, ‘A Wing and A Prayer: Paisley’s Gaelic Chapel Graveyard’ will reveal how research into a secluded former graveyard has illuminated the rich cultural heritage of Gaelic speaking people who migrated to Paisley in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Their lives were hard but Gaelic speakers performed a huge diversity of crafts and trades. Nowadays the site shows a diversity of a different kind – of wild plants and animals – providing a small wildlife refuge in the heart of Paisley.

‘A View of Gaeldom’ is an art exhibition, featuring works from the Paisley Museum collection that depict the beautiful scenery of those parts of Scotland in which Gaelic was traditionally spoken. Indeed Gaelic place names are in evidence in many of the titles. In addition some excellent examples of Celtic Revival Art will be displayed.

The final exhibition, ‘Weaving and Waulking’ will look at the traditional methods and skills of producing cloth in Scotland. ‘Waulking’ is a method of shrinking or ‘fulling’ newly woven tweed and is carried out by a group of women who sing in unison as they work the cloth on the table. During the week of the Royal National Mòd there will be opportunities to see a traditional hand loom in operation and demonstrations by waulking groups.

Councillor Jim Harte, Convener of Sport, Leisure and Cultural Policy Board at Renfrewshire Council states ‘ As we celebrate Paisley hosting the Royal National Mòd this year, these exhibitions are a wonderful opportunity to showcase the links Renfrewshire has with Gaelic heritage and culture.’  

 

Paisley Arts Centre in New Street

Paisley Arts Centre in New Street

Formerly The Laigh Kirk, Paisley Arts Centre in New Street was very busy on Doors Open Day providing activities for the children through drama and handcrafts. The café was also open, serving snack lunches and coffees on a lovely sunny afternoon.

All photographs taken with parents’ permission, by Anne McNair for www.paisley.org.uk.

Paisley Abbey

Explore area’s hidden gems for Doors Open Day

The countdown is on to Renfrewshire’s Doors Open Day, with more than 60 local buildings set to offer visitors a peek behind the scenes this weekend.

The event offers residents a showcase of the area’s fascinating architectural history, with this year marking the 20th anniversary of Renfrewshire’s participation.

This year – for the first time – there is a special feature for children in the form of a wicked-history-themed Diabolical Diaries booklet.

There will be prizes for any child who picks up at least five ‘venue-stamps’ in their booklet, available through all libraries and participating venues.

Buildings set to throw open their doors include historic gems such as Paisley Abbey as well as newer sites like St Mirren Park and the On-X Leisure Centre in Linwood.

Other highlights include a chance to see the A-listed Bascule Bridge at Renfrew in action, with the bridge set to open at 11am, 1pm and 3pm on Saturday.

Also open will be local churches, fire stations and Paisley Sheriff Court. There will also be tours of Glasgow Airport, but places on these are now fully booked.

Paisley Abbey

Other events of note include:

– a family fun day in Paisley’s Johnston Street to mark the end of a £1m investment in the Causeyside Street area from noon until 5pm on Saturday;

– an information event regarding the project to restore the stunning 19th-century Grand Fountain in Paisley’s Fountain Gardens from 1 to 4pm on Saturday;

– a consultation event to let residents have their say on the latest proposals for the Semple Heritage Trail project in Lochwinnoch’s Castle Semple Centre on Sunday from noon until 4pm.

Renfrewshire’s Provost Anne Hall said: “Doors Open Day is a great chance for residents to uncover the hidden gems on their own doorstep.

“Renfrewshire has some superb buildings, both old and new, and I would encourage everybody to get out and about and take stock of their own surroundings.”

Residents are also invited to take part in a photo competition through social media.

All they have to do to be in with a chance of some great prizes is share their photos of the day on Facebook, Twitter, Flickr or Instagram tagged with the hashtag #doorsopendaysrenfrewshire

Doors Open Day is one of many European Heritage Days, which take place in over 50 countries, with more than 20 million visits each year.

For more information and for a full list of participating venues, visit www.doorsopendays.org.uk, or pick up a brochure from any Renfrewshire library.