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Scottish Property Valuation Rolls for 1895 Go Online

Scottish Property Valuation Rolls for 1895 Go Online

New records reveal a colourful picture of Victorian society in Scotland

 

The names of more than two million Scots from the late Victorian age will be published today, as records of Scottish properties and their owners and occupiers in 1895 are released on ScotlandsPeople, the government’s family history website.

Called the Valuation Rolls, the records give an insight into Scottish society during that period, and will be a major resource for genealogists.

The records comprise more than two million indexed names and over 75,000 digital images, covering every kind of building, structure or property in Scotland that was assessed as having a rateable value.

The 1895 Valuation Rolls - Parish of Crathie and Braemar Reference: VR87/89/69 Crown copyright. National Records of Scotland.

The 1895 Valuation Rolls – Parish of Crathie and Braemar
Reference: VR87/89/69
Crown copyright. National Records of Scotland.

The Valuation Rolls include people from right across the social spectrum, from the wealthiest proprietors to the humblest property owners and tenants of Scotland’s urban housing.

Some fascinating aspects of social history in Scotland during the late Victorian age are revealed in the Rolls, including the growth of tea rooms, the opening of Scotland’s first crematorium and the provision of housing for workers, such as shale miners and prison staff.

Researchers at the National Records of Scotland have also identified many ‘tee-names’ in the Rolls, the names used in some communities in the north-east and elsewhere to distinguish people of the same name.

Every one of the Valuation Rolls on the website is fully searchable by name and address, with the records listing the names of owners, tenants and occupiers of each property – in many cases occupations are also included.

Fiona Hyslop, Cabinet Secretary for Culture and External Affairs in the Scottish Government, said:

“ScotlandsPeople is an incredible resource that enables Scots, those of Scottish descent and anyone with an interest in Scotland to find out more about our nation’s fascinating history, heritage, people and built environment. The release of the Valuation Rolls for 1895 is a welcome development that will strengthen the rich resource available in Scotland’s national archive.”

Tim Ellis, Registrar General and Keeper of the Records of Scotland, said:

“The release of the Valuation Rolls for 1895 will prove invaluable for family and local history research, enabling people to discover much more about who their ancestors were and how they lived. Reading an entry for a single building can provide a fascinating insight into local life at the time – adding to the information people can obtain from census records taken around that period. This forms part of the National Records of Scotland’s commitment to improving our service to the public and providing researchers with the resources that they need.”

Chris van der Kuyl, the CEO of brightsolid, the company that runs the ScotlandsPeople website on behalf of the National Records of Scotland, said:

“We’re very pleased to add a third set of Valuation Rolls indexes and images to the ScotlandsPeople website, bringing our total number of index entries to a remarkable 92 million. As part of an on-going digitisation project, the Valuation Rolls are an excellent historical resource and will help to bridge the gap between the 1891 and 1901 censuses.”

The 1895 Valuation Rolls are available on the ScotlandsPeople website (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk), and at the ScotlandsPeople Centre in Edinburgh.

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Scottish History Courses

Paisley Abbey Britain from above

History of Scotland 1 – LLNG07016 Credit and Level:10 points SCQF Level 7

Entry Requirements: LLNG07008 First Steps in IT or Basic IT competence

Assessment: Group project

Paisley Abbey Britain from aboveDelivery/Location:

Tuesday 6-9pm, September – Hamilton  from 25th Sept

Wednesday 6-9pm, September – Paisley from 26th Sept

Fee: £110 – Can be funded though ILA and first time students may qualify for a fee waver depending on their benefits.

Summary:

This module aims to introduce students to the history of Scotland from the 5th Century to the 15th Century, and to encourage recognition of the complexity of Scotland’s past,

through the study of primary and secondary sources. During this period Scotland emerged as a unified entity within the British Isles and established a national identity that

still remains today. The wars that led to the development of Scotland from a number of different kingdoms, and the later Wars of Independence fought between Scotland and

England, are central to this module.  Although the Focus is on Scotland, Paisley and Renfrewshire are dominant in the module giving participants a good introduction to local history as well as National, as does the 1697 Witch hunt case, where i spend a session looking at the accusations and its background.

 

Family Histories LLNG07014 Credit and Level: 10 points SCQF Level 7

Entry Requirements: LLNG07008 First Steps in IT/Basic IT competence

Assessment: Individual coursework, including family tree

Delivery/Location: Monday 6-9pm, September – Paisley from 24th Sept

NB. This module is delivered over 10 weeks.

Fee: £110 Can be funded though ILA and first time students may qualify for a fee waver depending on their benefits.

Summary:

This module will introduce the main issues associated with genealogical research in Britain and Ireland. It will embed basic research techniques for conducting online

and practical archive enquiry within the broader historical context of the west of Scotland in particular and the British Isles generally.

You will learn how to identify the key historical resources involved in genealogical research, notably the census, birth, death and marriage registers, and how to extract

and collate this information in the form of a ’family tree.’ This module will also give you an understanding of the economic, social and political circumstances that shaped

the life experiences of previous generations dating back to the early-Victorian era. The classes will consist of a combination of lectures and practical tutorials working

with family tree-building software such as that offered by MyHeritage, and online resources, in particular the official records made available through www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk

Please note: there will be additional costs to participate fully in this module. These concern the downloading of certificates and documents from the governmental agency run Scotland’s People website.

Lifelong Learning –  0141 848 3193

or Email: lifelonglearning@uws.ac.uk