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Fairtrade Tea Party

fair trade

Renfrewshire residents looking to find out more about Fairtrade and how to get involved in local campaigns are invited to a special event this weekend.

As part of Fairtrade Fortnight (Feb 22 – March 7) a special Fairtrade Tea Party is being held on Saturday 27 February in Paisley Town Hall.

The event will include a talk by Haitham Hasasneh, a livelihood development officer in the occupied Palestinian Territory working for Oxfam.

Haitham is a Palestinian agronomist with 20 years experience. His role is focused on increasing the quantity and quality of olive oil produced for markets and developing good cooperative governance and management by and for the farmers. He also focuses on promoting access of small scale farmers to international fair trade markets and producers like those in Scotland.

The Tea Party is also an opportunity for people to find out more about Fairtrade in their town or village and how to set up a local Fairtrade group. Members of Lochwinnoch, Bishopton and Erskine’s local Fairtrade groups will be on hand to give information and advice.

There will also be representatives of the Renfrewshire Fairtrade Steering Group, who have lead the campaign to make Renfrewshire a Fairtrade zone.

Councillor Brian Lawson, chair of the Renfrewshire Fairtrade Steering Group, said: “This event is open to everyone and is a good way to encourage people to hear about Fairtrade. However we are also specifically appealing to people who may have thought about getting involved in supporting Fairtrade in Renfrewshire but are not sure how to do this. We are really pleased to welcome Haitham to Renfrewshire and I am really interested to hear more about his Fairtrade work.

“On the day we will also be encouraging people to sign up to Renfrewshire’s I Swap Campaign running throughout Fairtrade Fortnight. We are aiming to get as many people as possible to sign a pledge to swap one of their regular shopping items for a Fairtrade version.”
The Fairtrade Tea Party starts at 10am in the Alexander Wilson Suite in Paisley Town Hall.

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Paisley Arts Centre – New Building

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This is probably an old page, certainly the news is old but I hadn’t seen this page before, this shows you the artists impression of the new Paisley Cultural building to be designed and built into the space that currently is the Museum and Art Galleries.

here is some text which is on the www.glasgowarchitecture.co.uk page.

Page Park has recently completed a pre-feasibility study for Renfrewshire Council. The practice has drawn up plans for a new cultural centre in the town following a brief from the Public-Private Partnership ‘Paisley Vision’. The proposals entail refurbishing the existing Town Hall, Library and refurbishing and extending the Museum to provide improved cultural facilities, with the designs forming part of the wider regeneration strategy for Paisley Town Centre.

The first Phase of the £30m proposals will be the £7m refurbishment and enhancement of the existing town hall. The designs include plans to relocate the central lending library into a wing of the town hall, this would allow the existing library space to be incorporated into a new cultural centre. The Cultural Centre will comprise gallery facilities as well as providing a new 175 seat auditorium with cafe and bar.

read more on this link here.

Oakshaw Trinity Church

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A little bit of history from the High Church otherwise known as Oakshaw Trinity Church, all information is on their website, http://oakshawtrinity.org

High Church
1843-1994

From the Reformation until 1736, the Abbey was the only church in the burgh and parish of Paisley. During that year, however, the Laigh Kirk was built in New Street, followed by the High Kirk in 1754, adding a significant feature to Paisley’s skyline, especially when the steeple was erected between 1767 and 1770.

In 1872, the Town Council promoted a Bill of Parliament “to secure by legislative enacment the town’s financial affairs”. This Bill proposed to pay each of the ministers of the town’s three churches £266-13s-4d per annum, being one third of the interest of 4% on £20,000, the sum in which the churches ranked in the estate of the Burgh.

Over the intervening years, extensive repairs involving excavating, asphaltic for ventilation and dry-rot prevention, erection of light cast-iron pillars to support the balcony, new seating and pulpit, hot water heating, new ornamental ceiling, plastering of all walls, a new entrace to the north side as well as new stairs to both sides of the gallery formed the grand scheme.

Substantial refurbishment was undertaken in the final years of the century in concert with the organ installation and re-siting of the original church hall, opened in 1880, now recognised as too small to cater for the needs of an expanded congregation. After negotiation for adjoining land in Oakshaw Street, the long-awaited new church hall was built in 1913 at a cost of £2000. The Session House was used for the first time that year, and the initial suite completed with the McLachlan Hall in 1924.

The complex was eventually extended by the gift of the Hutcheson School by William Lang, in memory of his sister, Margaret, in 1935. Incandescent lighting was installed in the church in 1906 and electric lighting in 1935 and 1967. The gift of a sound system was donated anonymously in 1971.

http://oakshawtrinity.org

Archaeological Dig At Paisley Abbey Goes Down The Drain

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A team from Glasgow Archeological Research Division (GUARD) are plumbing the depths of a medieval drain in the grounds of the 14th century Paisley Abbey, in Renfrewshire, Scotland. The dig is jointly part of Scottish Archaeology Month and Doors Open Day Scotland – an annual event that allows the public free access to otherwise off-limits buildings, historical and modern, across the country throughout September. Michael Fediginan, who runs the local interest website Paisley.org.uk, has been on hand to photograph and record the excavation, and gave Heritage Key an insight into progress so far. read more “text from Heritage Key”

Paisley Abbey manhole dig 2009

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Today, we can confirm that as part of Doors Open Day and Scottish Archaeology Month, archaeologists from the University of Glasgow “GUARD Glasgow University Archelogical Research Division” are conducting an investigation around the modern manhole which is the present access to the Drain, i was luckily enough to be told in june about the planned dig which started this morning on schedule.

Paisley Abbey’s drain is almost unique in Britain, being in parts somel.5 to 2 metres in height, beautifully built of dressed ashlar blocks. The drain was rediscovered in 1990 when archaeologists from the GUARD (Glasgow University Archaeological Research Division) were directed to the modern manhole by Frank Snow, of the then Strathclyde Sewage Department. The drain was excavated of 2 feet (60 cm) of silt which contained some amazing finds.

Fragments of pottery from several hundred vessels were recovered, along with a complete chamber pot (on display in Paisley Abbey sacristy). Work has been carried out this summer by Sabrina Gillman a post graduate student at Glasgow Uni, to catalogue and study this pottery. She has been assisted by many volunteers from Renfrewshire Local History Forum and Glasgow Archaeology Society.

Other finds included inscribed slates, buckles, lead seals, gaming pieces, and remains of more than one hundred and forty plants. Amongst these are food plants such as barley, wheat, onions, kale, imports such as mace and figs, and medicinal plants such as opium poppies, greater celandine and hemlock.

The excavation’s purpose is two-fold. First to provide information about the construction of the drain, and, it is hoped, help date the structure and reveal any earlier form of drain on the site.
Second, to establish whether there is any valuable archaeology here which might preclude use of the area for any future permanent viewing facility.
The archaeologists will be on site during Doors Open Day to explain their findings, and there will be an exhibition in Paisley Abbey providing more information about the drain.

paisley is very grateful to the University of Glasgow’s Archaeology Department, particularly Professor Steven Driscoll, Robert Will and Sabrina Gillman for their expertise and enthusiasm; the University of the West of Scotland, particularly Tony Grace of the School of Media, Language and Music for recording the dig and helping make it more widely known; Renfrewshire Local History Forum, particularly Andrew Eadie and Bruce Hendry for their unfailing support and enthusiasm; Frank Snow – the man who knew where the Drain was when the archaeologists couldn’t find it and who has kept his sense of excitement and ownership for nearly twenty years; and On Site Ltd, Acre Industrial and Scot Jet Ltd for their generous sponsorship of the dig.

information sent in by “historicalpaisley”

November Desktop Wallpaper

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Paisley Abbey at Night is this months new Desktop wallpaper click the image to see the larger size then simply right click and set as desktop wallpaper..