Posts

, , ,

Scottish Property Valuation Rolls for 1895 Go Online

Abdul-Karim-VR-87-89-69

Scottish Property Valuation Rolls for 1895 Go Online

New records reveal a colourful picture of Victorian society in Scotland

 

The names of more than two million Scots from the late Victorian age will be published today, as records of Scottish properties and their owners and occupiers in 1895 are released on ScotlandsPeople, the government’s family history website.

Called the Valuation Rolls, the records give an insight into Scottish society during that period, and will be a major resource for genealogists.

The records comprise more than two million indexed names and over 75,000 digital images, covering every kind of building, structure or property in Scotland that was assessed as having a rateable value.

The 1895 Valuation Rolls - Parish of Crathie and Braemar Reference: VR87/89/69 Crown copyright. National Records of Scotland.

The 1895 Valuation Rolls – Parish of Crathie and Braemar
Reference: VR87/89/69
Crown copyright. National Records of Scotland.

The Valuation Rolls include people from right across the social spectrum, from the wealthiest proprietors to the humblest property owners and tenants of Scotland’s urban housing.

Some fascinating aspects of social history in Scotland during the late Victorian age are revealed in the Rolls, including the growth of tea rooms, the opening of Scotland’s first crematorium and the provision of housing for workers, such as shale miners and prison staff.

Researchers at the National Records of Scotland have also identified many ‘tee-names’ in the Rolls, the names used in some communities in the north-east and elsewhere to distinguish people of the same name.

Every one of the Valuation Rolls on the website is fully searchable by name and address, with the records listing the names of owners, tenants and occupiers of each property – in many cases occupations are also included.

Fiona Hyslop, Cabinet Secretary for Culture and External Affairs in the Scottish Government, said:

“ScotlandsPeople is an incredible resource that enables Scots, those of Scottish descent and anyone with an interest in Scotland to find out more about our nation’s fascinating history, heritage, people and built environment. The release of the Valuation Rolls for 1895 is a welcome development that will strengthen the rich resource available in Scotland’s national archive.”

Tim Ellis, Registrar General and Keeper of the Records of Scotland, said:

“The release of the Valuation Rolls for 1895 will prove invaluable for family and local history research, enabling people to discover much more about who their ancestors were and how they lived. Reading an entry for a single building can provide a fascinating insight into local life at the time – adding to the information people can obtain from census records taken around that period. This forms part of the National Records of Scotland’s commitment to improving our service to the public and providing researchers with the resources that they need.”

Chris van der Kuyl, the CEO of brightsolid, the company that runs the ScotlandsPeople website on behalf of the National Records of Scotland, said:

“We’re very pleased to add a third set of Valuation Rolls indexes and images to the ScotlandsPeople website, bringing our total number of index entries to a remarkable 92 million. As part of an on-going digitisation project, the Valuation Rolls are an excellent historical resource and will help to bridge the gap between the 1891 and 1901 censuses.”

The 1895 Valuation Rolls are available on the ScotlandsPeople website (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk), and at the ScotlandsPeople Centre in Edinburgh.

, , , , , , , , , , ,

Scottish Property Records for 1905 Go Online

scotlandspeople_logo

Scottish Property Records for 1905 Go Online

From tenements to palaces – these records offer a fascinating snapshot of Scotland during the Edwardian era and are a major new genealogy resource

Over 2 million names of Scots included in the property records for 1905 are being released today online for the first time via ScotlandsPeople, the official government family history website. The new records, known as the Valuation Rolls and comprising over 2.4 million indexed names and over 74,000 digital images, cover every kind of building, structure or property in Scotland which were assessed as having a rateable value.

scotlandspeople_logoThe Rolls also reveal much about the changing social fabric of Scotland at this time – such as the growth in women owning property and running businesses, the rise in sports and recreation clubs, the development of music halls and theatres, and the expansion of railway hotels. As the Rolls include details about rents and the value of property, they will also help researchers to learn more about the cost of living during this period.

Fully-searchable by name and address, the records list the names of owners, tenants and occupiers of each property – so genealogists, historians and other researchers can now discover fresh insights into their ancestors’ lives through viewing these new records. As the 1905 Rolls appear between census years, they will be invaluable for genealogists who are trying to fill in gaps about their ancestors.

People from all social classes are included in the 1905 Valuation Rolls – from well-known land and property owners, to the tenants of Scotland’s tenements. Some of the famous Scots whose property situation appears in the records are AJ Balfour, Keir Hardie, Sir Hugh Munro, Lady Gordon Cathcart, Lord Armitstead and Donald Stewart (head gamekeeper to Queen Victoria).

Cabinet Secretary for Culture and External Affairs, Fiona Hyslop, said:

“ScotlandsPeople is a wonderful gateway to Scotland’s wealth of archives that tell the story of our nation and its people. I welcome this latest addition to their digital resources, which can be enjoyed by the people of Scotland, and people of Scottish descent everywhere.”

Audrey Robertson, Acting Registrar General and Keeper of the Records of Scotland, said:

The latest release of details about property owners and tenants in 1905 will be very useful for people researching the history of their family, or of their house or local area. The rolls can be searched alongside other records in ScotlandsPeople, and may help locate people who cannot be found in other sources.”

Chris van der Kuyl, the CEO of brightsolid, the company that enables ScotlandsPeople for the National Records of Scotland, said:

“The publication of the 1905 Valuation Rolls on ScotlandsPeople is another important piece of the jigsaw for helping people to trace their Scottish ancestry. As well as appealing to people’s fascination with property, these new records will complement the 1911 Census records that were published on ScotlandsPeople in 2011.”

The Valuation Rolls will be available on the ScotlandsPeople website (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk), and at the ScotlandsPeople Centre in Edinburgh. These new online records will be interesting both to people in Scotland and to the Scottish diaspora across the UK, USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and the rest of the world.

, , , , , , , , , ,

Scotlands People Wills and Testaments

scotlandspeople_logo

Wills and Testaments in Scotland, 1902 to 1925 Go Online

From inmates of poorhouses to owners of mansions – a fascinating portrait of Scottish life during the early 20th Century and a major new family history resource

 

A colourful picture of life in Scotland in the early 20th Century is revealed today, with the release of the Wills and Testaments from 1902 to 1925 by the National Records of Scotland on the ScotlandsPeople website.

scotlandspeople_logoThe new records, 392,595 in total, document the last wishes of 267,548 individuals who lived and died in Scotland during this period. The collection also includes the wills of Scots who died outside Scotland, but still had assets in the country. As inventories of moveable estate (savings, cash, furniture, stock, etc) are also included, you can discover the fine details of people’s worldly possessions in this era.

People from all social classes are included in the records – from famous industrialists and philanthropists such as Andrew Carnegie and George Coats, to the impoverished inmates of the nation’s poorhouses. With more than 35 millionaires included in the records, you can learn how the members of this Scottish ‘Rich List’ ultimately chose to divide up their wealth. Conversely, simpler and cheaper procedures for recording wills meant that estates below £500 were also included.

The records also highlight the effects of major historical events on people’s lives, with the wills of World War One soldiers, suffragettes and people who perished on the Titanic and Lusitania included in the collection. In addition to helping general historians with their research, the new records will also be invaluable to genealogists, who can use these documents to learn more about family relationships as well as the close friendships that their ancestors enjoyed.

Audrey Robertson, Acting Registrar General and Keeper of the Records of Scotland, said:

“We’re proud to be marking the tenth anniversary of ScotlandsPeople by creating a major enhancement of our popular resource for Scottish family history. The 400,000 additional testament entries from 1902 to 1925 will open up exciting new avenues for people in search of their Scottish ancestry.”

Cabinet Secretary for Culture and External Affairs, Fiona Hyslop, said:

“ScotlandsPeople is a wonderful gateway to Scotland’s wealth of archives that tell the story of our nation and its people. These wills and testaments offer a compelling and moving insight into the lives of Scots a century ago and provide a powerful connection to our past. I welcome the addition of so many more wills to the digital resources that can be enjoyed by the people of Scotland, and people of Scottish descent everywhere.”

The Wills and Testaments are available on the ScotlandsPeople website (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk) and at the ScotlandsPeople Centre in Edinburgh. These new online records will be interesting both to people in Scotland and to the Scottish diaspora across the UK, USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.

Sir William Arrol from Renfrewshire is even listed in the search.

  •  Sir William Arrol (1839-1913), Engineer – Ayr/Renfrewshire

To find out more about the Wills and Testaments in Scotland, 1902 to 1925 please click here.

,

Descendant of Scotland’s ‘Weaver Poet’ found by twitter.

roberttannahill-descendant

Descendant of Scotland’s ‘Weaver Poet’ found by twitter.

A tweet about Robert Tannahill was the catalyst that helped a woman living in south-east England to

learn that she is a descendant of Scotland’s ‘Weaver Poet’.

 

Caroline Shelley, a scenic artist from Waterlooville, made the chance discovery through reading a

tweet on the ScotlandsPeople Twitter page.

 

Caroline was researching her family history on the ScotlandsPeople website and had found that her

4xgreat grandmother was a Tannahill from Paisley. She then visited ScotlandsPeople on Twitter and

saw a tweet about the famous poet, who came a generation after Robert Burns.

 

“It was fate!” Caroline said. “I’d just learned that my Scottish ancestors were called Tannahill,

but I’d never heard of Robert Tannahill, so the surname didn’t mean anything to me. But then I

visited the ScotlandsPeople Twitter page and the first tweet was about Robert Tannahill! I did some

more digging using parish records and found that my 4xgreat grandmother’s father, also called

Robert, was the poet’s cousin. I’m thrilled – connecting the dots like this is amazing! I’m hoping

to visit Robert Tannahill’s cottage in Paisley on a future visit to Scotland.”

 

Dee Williams, Head of the ScotlandsPeople Centre, said: “We’re delighted that Caroline has made this

connection with such an important figure in Scottish history and literature. Caroline’s online

journey to reach Robert Tannahill used BMD certificates, census papers and then parish records. So

it’s great to know that these documents helped Caroline with her ancestral jigsaw.”

 

With one poet now residing in “Poets’ Corner” of Caroline’s family tree, Ms Shelley is now hoping

that she might be related to other famous poets. “I haven’t found a connection to Percy Bysshe

Shelley yet”, Caroline said, “but would love to be related to both poets!”

www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk