, , , , , , , , ,

Kids go on the colour run

You’ve never seen colour run so fast as youngsters enjoyed an unusual race during the October Week Activities Camp, at The ON-X Sports Centre, in Linwood.

youngsters and staff at Linwood’s ON-X Sports Centre’s Colour Run Race during the October holiday activities camp.

More than 30 youngsters took part in the Colour Run Race, which saw them run round the athletics track and take part in an obstacle course while being pelted with powdered paint.

Some of the runners even stopped to let the team leaders cover them in the multi-coloured paint powder.
And the result was a bunch of kids enjoying being turned pink, green, orange and yellow.

The Colour Run Race was just one of the many fun activities organised for them by Renfrewshire Leisure the youngsters took part in.

Chief executive of Renfrewshire Leisure, Joyce McKellar said: “Our school holiday activity camps are becoming more popular every year and we try to bring lots of fun into the activities.

“Our staff spend a lot of time coming up with new ideas for activities for the kids to enjoy.”

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

International Credit Union (ICU) Day® celebrates the spirit of the global credit union movement.

Thursday 19th October 2017 Credit Unions all over the world come together to celebrate the great work that credit unions carry out. Renfrewshire-Wide Credit Union (RWCU) established in 2006 by a group of volunteers from different local areas decided to work together, to ensure that everyone who worked or lived in Renfrewshire had access to a credit union.

From their hard work Renfrewshire-Wide Credit Union was born. Ten years later Renfrewshire-Wide Credit Union is proud to be serving our community to provide access to affordable, ethical financial services, as well as working with local schools to educate our young people on the benefits of saving via the RWCU Cash Cubs program.

RWCU’s General Manager, Karen Wallace, said “Our aim at Renfrewshire-Wide Credit Union has always been to promote ethical, affordable financial choices. We believe that our credit union services and products offer the people of Renfrewshire a great value, community-based alternative to the poor deals offered elsewhere.”

What?

A credit union is a ‘mutual’ organisation, this means that it is owned by its members and all the benefits are for members alone, keeping the money in Renfrewshire for the benefit of the people of Renfrewshire. We provide affordable loans at fair rates of interest to meet every day needs, such as replacing a broken washing machine right through to a home extension. We also provide a range of savings plans and other accounts that help members save and manage their money.

 

Why?

With a wide range of products and services why would you not join? Whether you’re saving for a rainy day or looking to access ethical affordable loans then look no further than your local credit union. Being a not-for-profit organisation means it’s about what’s best for YOU, not what makes the most money. This means we are able to offer our members products and services such as –

 

Savings Accounts

Ethical affordable loans up to £10,000

Christmas accounts

Payroll Deduction

School Credit unions

Funeral Finance

Online account access

 

For more information on the products and services available please visit www.rwcu.co.uk for more information.

 

RWCU is a member of the Financial Services Compensation Scheme established under the Financial services and Markets act 2002. In respect of deposits with a UK office, payments under the scheme are limited to 100% of the first £85,000. This may be subject to change please visit www.fscs.org.uk for the latest information.  

RWCU is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) and the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) 446350.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Mall staff volunteer for gardening work at hospice

STAFF from intu Braehead have been working hard tidying up and planting shrubs and flowers in the gardens at a local hospice.
Along with workers from Cardwell Nurseries, they volunteered to spend a day working at St Vincent’s Hospice, in Johnstone.

The gardening was part of intu’s company-wide initiative encouraging staff to take the time from their work schedule to help support a local charity or community work.
Hospice Trust Fundraiser, Katrina Vine said: “We are extremely grateful to the team from intu Braehead and Cardwell Nurseries for their support.

“Our courtyard area was tired and overgrown and the difference the intu team has made to our courtyard and garden is immense. It now offers a tranquil and peaceful area.
“We rely on our volunteers to help in many different areas of the hospice, from housekeeping to maintenance, driving and patient care.

“The team helping with the garden and landscaping not only created a better environment for our patients and their families, it also saved us money, allowing vital funds to be directed to patient care.
“Each year we must raise £1.2 million to operate the hospice and offer valuable care to patients and their families in the Renfrewshire area. We could not achieve this without the support of our local business partners such as intu and Cardwell and our local community.”

Lydia Brown, community development manager at intu Braehead said: “Our staff volunteering to help good causes is one way we show that intu Braehead wants to play a positive role in our community.”

Drew Gallagher, managing director of Cardwell Nurseries, based in Gourock added: “A well kept garden can be a place where people can relax and find peace and quiet for a while.
“We hope everyone at St Vincent’s will enjoy their garden area we’ve helped create.”

If any local charities or community groups need help with tasks like landscaping, gardening, painting and decorating, or repairs to damaged property, they should email braehead.community@intu.co.ukor call Lydia Brown on 0141 885 1441.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

AGS Airports Ltd media statement

AGS Airports Ltd can today (Wednesday, October 11) announce that Chief Executive Officer Amanda McMillan has signalled her intention to stand down following a family decision to relocate to Australia.

Mrs McMillan, who also has responsibility for Glasgow Airport, where she has been Managing Director for over nine years, will continue in her role until early 2018. 

AGS Airports Chairman Sir Peter Mason said: “On behalf of the AGS Board, I would like to convey our sincere thanks to Amanda for the outstanding job she has done in establishing the AGS Airports Ltd group since its creation in 2014.

“Through her distinctive brand of leadership, AGS has become one of the UK’s leading airport groups. During this period, our airports in Aberdeen, Glasgow and Southampton have benefited hugely from her drive and commitment to continually improve the customer experience for our growing number of passengers.

Mrs McMillan added: “I have thoroughly enjoyed leading AGS Airports.  It is with mixed emotions that I am planning to move on, but this opportunity is one that comes at the right time for us as a family. I am immensely proud of the team at AGS which has delivered significant passenger growth, secured new carriers, built enviable destination lists and completed a series of first-class modernisation projects.”

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

24 hour cyclathon

2 bikes, 48 cyclists and a lot of sore legs later, Andrea and Alan Gibson, along with friends Lesley and Mike Gallagher and Stuart and Eve Gibson completed a gruelling cycling challenge at the Houston Inn that raised an incredible £4, 403.10 for St Vincent’s Hospice.

 

The motivation for event organiser Andrea, was the care that her father in law received during his final days at the hospice.

 

Andrea said “We cannot express the gratitude we as a family feel towards the staff at St Vincent’s Hospice. My father in law was very passionate about cycling so the cyclathon seemed like a fitting event to raise money for the hospice.”

 

A total of 48 cyclist took part in the event with 2 stationery bikes outside the Houston Inn from 8:30am – 8:30pm. After the challenge around 200 locals danced the night away and took part in a raffle and competitions to win some fantastic prizes.

Andrea said: “We really appreciate all the companies and businesses that have supported our fundraising, without which, it wouldn’t have been the success that it was.”

 

Laura McDade, fundraiser at St Vincent’s Hospice said “Well done to all 48 cyclists that took part. What a fantastic way to fundraise! We know the preparation that goes into these type of events so we really appreciate the support.”

 

“If you are interested in holding your own fundraising event in aid of St Vincent’s Hospice please contact the fundraising team on 01505705635 or email  info@svh.co.uk

 

Pictured in the hospice community garden

“Vinnie” the hospice mascot and Elaine Grealey, volunteer services manager, receive cheque from cyclathon event organised by Andrea Gibson and friends.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Hat-trick of wins for Kilbarchan AAC in annual sports awards

COACHES from Kilbarchan Amateur Athletic Club ran out with a hat-trick of wins at the annual Renfrewshire Sports Awards.
Arthur Smith won both the Community Coach of the Year and Dedication to Sport awards along with John Rodger, who lifted the Event Volunteer of 2017 award.

Arthur has been a member of Kilbarchan AAC for more than 50 years and has been coaching young athletes for three decades, including Scottish internationalist, Laura Stark and GB runner, Jemma Reekie.
John has been involved with the club for more than 20 years and has been instrumental in the development of athletics – cross-country, road race and track and field events in Renfrewshire’s schools. He is also heavily involved in organising the popular annual Paisley 10k Race and Fun Run.

Other winners presented with awards at the event,organised by Renfrewshire Lerisure and held at a ceremony in Johnstone Town Hall, were – Development Coach of the Year, Susan Wright, who is head coach of Clyde Judo Club; Young Coach of the Year, Claire Scougall, who coaches Paisley Juniors Netball Club and Volunteer of the Year was won by Joanne McDowall, who has developed sporting activity at Barsail Primary, in Erskine.
Young Volunteer of the Year went to Lusia Steele, who delivers school health days at Barsail Primary and volunteers at the Johnstone Jets cycling club; Disability Coach of the Year is Rachel Killens, who is a disabled athlete herself and coaches swimmers with additional support needs.

And Jack Thomson, a referee at the Basketball Paisley Friday Night Superleague, West Regional Development League and other Scottish League games, won the Technical Official of the Year award.
The Honour Our School Sports Award was given to one student from every local secondary school who has shown commitment to sport. The winners were –
Alan Rice, Linwood High; Amy McCann, Renfrew High; Craig Kennedy, Park Mains High; Eilidh Murphy, Gleniffer High; Franca Paterson, St Andrew’s Academy; Gemma Whyte, St Benedict’s High; John Martin, Johnstone High; Mario Girasoli, Trinity High and Rebecca Telford, from Gryffe High.

A Level Six Award in Higher Sports Leadership was presented to Alan Rice, Calum Findlay, Emma Driver, Heather Fawcett and Laura-Rose Reid.
The special guest at the awards ceremony was Corinne Hutton, from Lochwinnoch who has defied the odds after having had both her hands and legs amputated when she suffered acute pneumonia and septicemia.
Since losing her limbs, Corinne has gone on to set three world records including becoming the first female quadruple amputee to climb Ben Nevis. She has also set up a charity called Finding Your Feet to support families affected by amputation, or limb differences through a range of sporting and social inclusion initiatives.

Corinne took to the stage for a Question and Answer Session with the event host, broadcaster Lorraine Herbison.

Chair of Renfrewshire Leisure, Councillor Lisa Marie Hughes said: “These awards showcase the talent, dedication and commitment of individuals in our community.

“With Paisley’s bid to become UK city of Culture 2021, sport plays a large role in the culture of our community. We have a vibrant and exciting sports network in Renfrewshire, which adds energy and passion to the overall bid.”
The successful event was sponsored by Renfrewshire Council, West College Scotland, Renfrewshire Sports Network, and SportScotland.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Paisley statues yarn bombed

She was infamous for not being amused but even Queen Victoria would have raised a smile as her statue was one of a string across Paisley to be yarn bombed.

Passers-by stopped in their tracks when they saw the legendary monarch, who stands in Dunn Square, sporting a specially created tartan crinoline skirt and traffic cone crown.

The William Dunn memorial was also dressed and given silver knitted cups to mark the fact it used to be a water fountain.

Robert Tannahill’s statue in Abbey Close also enjoyed a makeover with the town’s famous weaver poet dressed in a knitted scarf with musical notes, waistcoat and gaiters.

A knitted lawn with flowers completed the yarn bombing to mark his catalogue of songs and poems celebrating nature.

The installations are part of the Winter Coats yarn bombing project, where a series of local groups worked with textile artists Ashley Holdsworth and Bex Smith to research historical figures and then create a garment for them.

With the support of the NHS’s Network Services, Capability Scotland, the Phoenix Activity Group, Craft to Recover, Laugh n Craft, the Disability Resource Centre and patients from wards at Dykebar and Leverndale all took part.

Their colourful creations were installed to coincide with the start of Renfrewshire’s contribution to the Scottish Mental Health Arts Festival.

The display of street art also saw statues of Sir Peter and Thomas Coats beside Dunn Square dressed in a Paisley pattern kilt and a waistcoat decorated with thread and ribbon to represent the family’s textiles empire and history.

At the town’s Russell Institute, where local children used to receive their inoculations, some of the infant statues were draped with sock teddy bunting. The cuddly toys were crafted to come with miniature slings and walking sticks in recognition of the institute’s child welfare clinic roots.

The town’s other illustrious textile family weren’t forgotten, with George Clark’s statue given a mortar board in honour of his family’s passion for education.

Renowned ornithologist and poet Alexander Wilson’s statue at Abbey Close was yarn bombed with a bird cage and birds.

Renfrewshire Council Leader Iain Nicolson said: “The project is a fitting contribution to the Scottish Mental Health Arts Festival and shows how the different groups all researched and understood the history of the statues and who they commemorate.

“It’s a great way of shining a light on our unique cultural heritage as we bid to be UK City of Culture for 2021. “

The Winter Coats initiative is part of a wider five year project, Renfrewshire Council’s Paisley Townscape Heritage Conservation Area Regeneration Scheme 2.

It has also received funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund and Historic Environment Scotland and has a total budget of £4.5m.

Ten per cent of the funding is allocated to a Cultural and Heritage programme which aims to engage the community in the architectural and textiles heritage of Paisley.

Lucy Casot, Head of Heritage Lottery Fund Scotland said: “Thanks to funds raised through the National Lottery, a new sense of belief and pride in Paisley’s past is growing. Fun projects like this, rooted in the town’s historic past clearly demonstrate the creative spirit alive today.

“We have invested in many projects across the town which have seen historic buildings restored, communities exploring their heritage and also confirmed our latest commitment with initial support for the transformational plans for Paisley’s museum.”

Michael Easson from Historic Environment Scotland, which partly funded the project, said: “It’s exciting to see an innovative and fun new initiative to engage people across myriad backgrounds with their local built environment.

“I hope this brings a wider awareness to the Renfrewshire Mental Health Arts Festival as well as the Historic Environment Scotland supported Paisley TH.CARS2 scheme.”

The practice of yarn bombing is thought to have started in the US by Texas knitters who wanted to find a creative way to use their leftover and unfinished knitting projects. It’s since been adopted across the globe.

A wider network of groups have also been making scarves to tie onto railings which will be donated to the homeless service in Paisley’s Abercorn Street.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Pupils supported by their parents heading back to school

An innovative education project is helping Renfrewshire pupils to reach their full potential by inviting their parents to get back into school.

Parents of pupils in three secondary schools – Gryffe, Castlehead and Trinity High – were invited to take part in a pilot of the Parents in Partnership programme between August and October 2016 as part of a series of projects supporting Renfrewshire Council’s ambition to close the poverty related attainment gap.

The pilot project – funded by Renfrewshire Council in association with the Centre for Excellence for Looked After Children in Scotland (CELCIS) at the University of Strathclyde –  assessed how a child’s attainment might relate to parental or carer involvement.

CELCIS, who work with local authorities to make lasting improvements in the wellbeing of children and young people living in and on the edges of care and their families, looked at how the programme made a difference for parents and the benefits it had on pupils, with the results published in the report Parents in Partnership 2016 Evaluation.

Parents, who attended school one morning a week for six weeks, said that the flexible model of the programme meant their unique family circumstances were taken into account and they were supported by the Homelink service, who work with identified pupils and their families to improve achievement and attainment.

One parent explained that attending the sessions helped open the lines of communication, while another said it was now much easier to approach the school to ask for support.

Teachers also found that parents were able to read with their children more often once they realised it only needed to involve fifteen minutes of reading and a chat afterwards.

Renfrewshire Council’s Convener of Education and Children’s Services Policy Board, Councillor Jim Paterson, said: “Renfrewshire is ambitious for our pupils. We want all young people to reach their full potential, regardless of their background.

“Reducing the impact of poverty on attainment is a key priority for the Council and being part of Scottish Government’s Attainment Challenge, supported by the Pupil Equity Fund, is a big deal for Renfrewshire’s children.

“We’ve already seen results from adopting the Renfrewshire Literacy Approach in partnership with the University of Strathclyde, which has seen teachers adapting teaching styles to develop a love of reading in all pupils.

“We know involving parents and carers in school life is a great way to support pupils, with parents encouraging reading at night and that has a knock-on effect to how well the child does at school.

“The report by CELCIS shows good progress on supporting those who need that extra bit of assistance through school and reinforces that parents and teachers are all working together to provide the best opportunities for children.

“High school is an unknown world for parents, so being able to involve them in the school day and encouraging more communication between teachers and parents has been incredibly beneficial.

“Parents have told us that they have benefitted from understanding high school life, felt they could talk to their child more about school and that they had much more confidence in approaching the school for support, while pupils have also felt they have more support at home.

“We will continue to build on the project, responding to the needs of parents and carers as well as the pupils across Renfrewshire schools.”

Linda O’Neill, Education Programme Lead from CELCIS, who developed this approach, said “We know that working with parents and carers in a meaningful way through school has the real potential to support family learning and improve the wellbeing of both children and their parents and carers.  It’s great to see Renfrewshire Council making a commitment to develop real and lasting partnerships between parents, schools and communities though Parents in Partnership”

All secondary schools in Renfrewshire, including the Mary Russell School, run similar parental engagement programmes.

To find out more about the Parents in Partnership programme evaluation, visit www.celcis.org.

Ends

Notes to Editor:

1. Image caption:

Parents from Gryffe and Castlehead high schools with Anne Marie Haddow, Deputy Head at Trinity High School, Chris Anderson, Principal Teacher (attainment) at Gryffe High School, Jim Russ, Education Support Manager at Castlehead High School, Linda O’Neill of CELCIS and Cllr Jim Paterson, Education adn Children’s Services Convener at Renfrewshire Council.

2. To read the full report, visit www.celcis.org/knowledge-bank/search-bank/parents-partnership-programme-evaluation-2017/.

3. Renfrewshire Council Home Link Service aims to help parents engage in supporting their children’s education. Research suggests parental engagement in education makes an important contribution to a child’s educational attainment throughout the school years. This is particularly true for children from disadvantaged backgrounds.

4. In Scotland a child’s socio-economic status is the strongest predictor of educational attainment, which leads to a significant gap in attainment between pupils from the least disadvantaged and those from the most disadvantaged backgrounds (OECD, 2010). Current research indicates that “only parental involvement makes a significant contribution to closing the attainment gap” (JRF, 2014).

5. CELCIS, based at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, is committed to making positive and lasting improvements in the wellbeing of Scotland’s children living in and on the edges of care. Taking a multi-agency, collaborative approach towards making lasting change, CELCIS works alongside leaders, managers and practitioners to break down barriers and forge new paths in order to change thinking and ways of working with everyone whose work touches the lives of vulnerable children and families. CELCIS builds on national experience to inform its work in different countries around the world and plays a key role in the work of the University’s Institute for Inspiring Children’s Futures.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

BBC Rip Off Britain Live

BBC Rip Off Britain Live is coming to Glasgow! It will be broadcast live daily between 16-20th October 2017 and we are looking for audience members to be a part of the show. As well as the excitement of the live broadcast, we also have a number of experts on hand to take questions from the audience about their consumer queries.

 

If you are interested in being part of our Glasgow audience for Rip Off Britain: Live, then please send us an email with your name and contact details to: RipOffBritain@bbc.co.uk  and a member of the team will be in touch or you can call us on 0303 083 6588.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/showsandtours/takepart/rip_off_britain_live

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Basketball Paisley

Basketball Paisley are the biggest and most successful basketball club in Scotland and are looking out for new talent to join their community clubs being held all across Renfrewshire and East Renfrewshire.

Over 150 young people across Renfrewshire and East Renfrewshire attended basketballpaisley Community Clubs during the Autumn term and have been competing in our Friday Night Superleague.

Booking for our Winter Term is now open to new and returning players. Whether you have played before or are a beginner visit the link below to book the complete term or a 1-week trial: https://basketballpaisley.class4kids.co.uk/