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UK City of Culture win would be ‘life changing’ for Paisley people says previous winner

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Winning the UK City of Culture title would be a ‘life-changing experience’ for the people of Paisley and Renfrewshire – says the city which first hosted the title four years ago.

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The Northern Irish city of Derry-Londonderry was UK City of Culture in 2013 – and has promised Paisley is in line for wide-ranging economic and social benefits should it land the prestigious title.

Paisley was last weekend named the only Scottish bidder on the shortlist for the 2021 competition, alongside Coventry, Stoke, Sunderland and Swansea.

And one of the key figures behind Derry-Londonderry’s year in the international spotlight says Paisley’s long-term economic future would be transformed if it emerges as the winner.

That year saw the city host major events such as BBC Radio One’s Big Weekend and prestigious modern art showcase The Turner Prize.

Oonagh McGillion, Director of Legacy with Derry City and Strabane District Council said: “The hosting of the inaugural UK City of Culture in 2013 was life-changing for our citizens – it not only gave us a real sense of pride and achievement but instilled new confidence and aspirations for the entire community.

“It was also place-changing in terms of investment in regeneration and the local environment and was hugely successful in uniting our communities to share and celebrate their experiences.

“We believe our city is still in the early stages of its development and the economic legacy projected will be realised over a ten-year period.

“The UK City of Culture title was significant for us in bringing about positive investment in cultural regeneration, developing our visual arts and expanding our festival and events offering, as well as increasing our hotel occupancy figures and audience attendance at cultural events.

“Recently we launched details of our joint bid with Belfast to bid for the European Capital of Culture for 2023 and this would be a significant legacy project not only for Derry and Belfast but for all of Northern Ireland.

“Securing UK City of Culture would be a fantastic coup for Paisley in terms of investment, regeneration and profile and in putting it on the map.”

Paisley’s bid for the title is taking place as part of a wider push to use the town’s unique cultural and heritage offer to make it a key destination within Scotland.

That includes a new destination brand for the area, investment in cultural infrastructure – such as the £42m plans to transform Paisley Museum – and an expansion of the area’s existing events programme which already includes big days such as the British Pipe Band Championships, The Spree and the Halloween Festival.

That work is set to happen with or without the UK City of Culture title – but should Paisley win in 2021 it would take the town’s profile to new levels, while giving the chance to secure long-lasting benefits.

And statistics show the extent to which Derry has built a legacy of a new tourist economy over the past four years – welcoming even more visitors in 2016 than it did in 2013 when hosting the title.

Odhran Dunne, general manager of Visit Derry said: “In 2012 the city had 164,000 overnight visitors, which rose to 254,000 in 2013 and last year reached 283,000.

“The profile that 2013 created really did a lot for us in terms of attracting people to come here.”

Paisley is due to submit its second-stage bid to be UK City of Culture 2021 in September, with the winner to be announced at the end of the year.

For more information on Paisley’s bid, see paisley2021.co.uk

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Upcoming Events at The Old Swan

Upcoming Events at The Old Swan, 20 Smithhills Street, Paisley.

Our annual T in the Swan is on Saturday 2nd September, check out our Facebook page for more details.

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Rukeri Launches New Billboard Advertising Campaigns

Rukeri, a brand of Salt and Grit Solutions Ltd, has launched a new billboard advertising campaign in Paisley to help develop brand awareness and increase its customer base.

The campaign will run for 8 weeks with the adverts displayed at strategic locations throughout Paisley that include main arterial routes to maximise exposure. The advert has a simple, clean design with the same strapline on all boards, ‘You don’t have to be on the other side to have greener grass.’

Lisa Taylor, Marketing Executive at Rukeri says, ‘This is an exciting move for us as historically we have communicated to our customers through various print and online campaigns along with direct mail. A high number of our new customers find out about us from recommendations from friends and peers. This is great, but we would like to close the gap and reach more people ourselves as when our customers find us, they love what we do!’

The company supplies a range of landscaping products to both trade and public customers, to compliment the main business arm of supplying turf. Rukeri boasts an impressive number of turf fields and is committed to only supplying premium quality turf. The turf is cut daily and always fresh to order, meaning there is no time in transit or storage – paramount at this time of year for people looking to lay a new lawn.

Keep your eyes peeled for the adverts, and you can let Rukeri know what you think of them through their Facebook page www.facebook.com/Rukeri or in store.

For more information contact Rukeri:

0141 889 1455

info@rukeri.com

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Piping competition drums up another successful event for Paisley

Paisley town centre was filled with the sound of pipes and drums on Saturday (22 July) for the eighth annual Pipe Band Competition.

Grade 1 1st Johnstone

Crowds lined High Street and County Square to watch pipers and drummers from across Scotland compete to be named champions.

The successful event is part of the exciting and expanding calendar of cultural events across Renfrewshire taking place as part of Paisley’s bid to be named UK City of Culture in 2021 with the town last week being named as the only Scottish place on the shortlist for the prestigious title.

Each band marched from High Street to the final tuning area at the Cenotaph before making their way to the main arena in County Square. They then performed to a panel of judges from the Royal Scottish Pipe Band Association who organise the event each year.

The standard of competition was extremely high, with Johnstone Pipe Band performing particularly well in their categories and Dumbarton and District securing the novice award.

The winning bands were presented with their trophies by chieftain of the event, Renfrewshire’s Provost Lorraine Cameron. She said: “The Paisley Pipe Band Competition is an event that many people across Scotland look forward to each year and I was very proud to be able to present the bands with their recognition for a great day’s entertainment.

“Paisley demonstrated once again that it can put on successful events providing a great setting for the pipers, drummers and large crowds who came to experience the sounds and spectacle of Saturday’s competition. There was even more reason to celebrate as the event was the first one held in the town since the announcement was made that Paisley had made it through to the next stage in its bid to be named UK City of Culture 2021.”

Saturday also marked the 30th anniversary of the Paisley Arts Centre. To celebrate this important milestone Renfrewshire Leisure organised for a Family Fun Day to take place where children and parents could enjoy a range of activities including watching a puppet theatre, performances from PACE and participating in craft workshops.

The Paisley 2021 bid has made it through to the second and final stage of the competition and is the sole Scottish town or city featured in the shortlist. The bid aims to transform the town and Renfrewshire’s future by using its unique cultural and heritage offering as the home of the Paisley Pattern and one-time centre of the global textile industry.

Final bids are expected to be lodged with the UK Government’s Department for Culture, Media and Sport in in September 2017 with a final decision expected in December.

For more information on Paisley 2021, visit www.paisley2021.co.uk, like /Paisley2021 on Facebook or follow @Paisley2021 on Twitter and Instagram.

For more information on the winners please visit the Royal Scottish Pipe Band Association website at www.rspba.org.

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Core 2 Computing deals

Core 2 computing currently have a range of refurbished Dell Intel i5 desktop and laptop computers in stock. These all come with 4GB ram and have the latest 2017 updated version of Windows 10 installed along with word processing software.

All ready to take home today to get ready for back to school/university/college or general home use. The desktops have a 12 month hardware warranty and 6 months for the laptops.

You will have to be quick as Only 2 desktops and 3 laptops left in this deal.

Give us a call on 0141 889 6363 or come along to 10 Wellmeadow Street, Paisley.

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TAG Street Party 2017

Come along to a fantastic day of free family fun in the heart of Paisley.  This is the fifth year the TAG Street Party has been run with thousands of people popping in throughout the day each year.  Here at ECF Paisley (www.ecfpaisley.org), we are continually working on ways in which we can serve the community that we are part of. Being based in Paisley Town Centre on Gordon Street, we love putting on an event that celebrates Paisley and encourages community.

The TAG Street Party is one of the ways that we love to do this. It includes a BBQ Cafe, a Kids Creative Centre (open 12pm – 3pm), Bouncy Castles and Assault Course, lots of Games, Facepainting, Balloon Modeling and Psalm Reading.  The best part: Everything is Free!

Date: Saturday 12th August

Time: 10am – 4pm

Location: County Square, Paisley

Cost: Everything is Free

websitewww.trueactsofgoodness.com
facebookwww.facebook.com/trueactsofgoodness

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Drop-in summer social clubs offer fun for Renfrewshire’s young people

Young people aged 10 – 18 years old looking for summer activities can drop into free youth social clubs during the school holiday period.

young people at Positive About Youth awards 2016 (credit to Erskine Music and Media Studios)

The summer sessions are provided by Renfrewshire Council’s youth services team to support young people looking to make new friends, meet up with existing friends and have fun together.

The drop-in sessions will offer a range of activities, including arts and crafts, gaming, trips, photography, digital art and film making, will be held on:

-Every Tuesday and Thursday, 1.30-3.30pm and 6.30-8.30pm (ages 10-16) at Foxbar Youth Learning Centre

-Every Tuesday, 6.30-8.30pm (junior ages) and Thursday 6.30-8.30pm (senior ages) at the GoZone, Glenburn

-Every Wednesday, 3.30-5.30pm (P6 and P7) or 6-8.30pm (S1+) at Bargarran Community Centre

-Wednesday 19 July, 1.30-3.30pm (P6, P7 and S1) at Glasgow Nepalese Association Hall, Gallowhill

-Thursday 20 and 27 July, 2-4pm (P6 and P7) or 5-7pm (ages 12-18) at the Tannahill Centre, Ferguslie

Young people will also be able to have their say on what’s important to them in their community by taking part in the youth services survey as well as finding out information, such as how to get a Young Scot card, joining a Youth Voice group or the new LGBT group, volunteering in the area or working towards a Duke of Edinburgh award.

Those interested in outdoor activities can learn how to build a shelter, make a campfire, using hammocks and swings as well as survival skills by signing up to a free bush craft skill sessions for 11-18 year olds.

Renfrewshire Council’s Convener of Education and Children’s Services Policy Board, Councillor Jim Paterson, said: “It is important that young people feel that they can have access to summer activities that suit them and help them feel part of the community.

“The summer drop-in sessions and clubs are a great way for young people to get to know each other outside of school and for them to have their say on what services they want and need from the youth services team.”

To find out more, visit young.scot/renfrewshire, email youth@renfrewshire.gov.uk or like /YoungRenfrewshire on Facebook.

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Piping hot talent is heading for Paisley

Paisley town centre will welcome some of Scotland’s top piping talent for the annual Paisley Pipe Band Competition this Saturday (22 July).

The event, which is in its eighth year, will see pipers and drummers from across Scotland fill the town with the sound of bagpipes and the beat of drums.

Thousands are expected to watch the bands as they parade from High Street to the main competition arena in County Square. There, judges from the Royal Scottish Pipe Band Association – West of Scotland branch will judge the bands on their performances across the various grades. Spectators will be able to enjoy the performances during the day, with the March Past at 4.30pm.

Bands compete from 10.30am and then the massed bands will gather at 5.30pm for the prize-giving ceremony with the Chieftain.

The competition, organised by the Royal Scottish Pipe Band Association (RSPBA) and Renfrewshire Council, have quickly come to be regarded as one of the most prestigious events on the calendar. This year’s event is part of an exciting and expanding calendar of cultural events for Renfrewshire following the successful shortlisting of Paisley’s bid for UK City of Culture 2021.

Chieftain of the event, Provost Lorraine Cameron, said: “The Paisley Pipe Band Competition has attracted huge numbers of people to the town in the years that the event has been running.

“The standard of piping is extremely high attracting bands from across Scotland to compete demonstrating the prestigious nature of the event.

“These events bring big crowds into our towns and give local communities another reason to feel proud about living in Paisley and Renfrewshire. It’s also a great reason to join in the celebrations as Paisley 2021 has made it through to the second stage of the bid for the UK City of Culture 2021.”

This marks the second large scale piping event to take place in the town this year. Earlier this year, Paisley hosted the British Pipe Band Championships which saw thousands of people turn out to St James Playing Fields for one of the biggest events in world piping.

A Family Fun Day has been organised by Renfrewshire Leisure in and around the grounds of the Arts Centre, to mark its 30th anniversary, on Saturday between noon and 4pm. Youngsters can enjoy watching puppet theatre, take part in craft workshops and enjoy drama from PACE.

For more information on Paisley 2021, visit www.paisley2021.co.uk, like /Paisley2021 on Facebook or follow @Paisley2021 on Twitter and Instagram.

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Support pours in as Paisley becomes only Scottish place on UK City of Culture 2021 shortlist

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Backing for Paisley’s bid to be UK City of Culture 2021 has poured in from across the political spectrum with the town now the only Scottish place in the running to be the UK’s next City of Culture.

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The UK Government’s Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport last night announced the five places on the shortlist for the prestigious culture title – with Paisley joined by Coventry, Stoke, Sunderland and Swansea.

The five cities were chosen after the initial 11 bidders were whittled down – and will now submit detailed second-stage bids before the winner is announced at the end of the year.

Paisley is bidding for the title as part of a wider push to use the town’s unique heritage and cultural story as the home of the globally-recognised Paisley Pattern to transform its future.

It is estimated Paisley’s 2021 year could bring a £172m economic boost and create the equivalent of 4,700 jobs over a ten-year period.

Current UK City of Culture hosts Hull have seen £1 billion of investment since winning the title in 2013, with the city attracting 1.4m visitors in just the first three months of its year in the spotlight.

There has never been a Scottish winner – although Dundee made the shortlist four years ago – and senior government figures from across the country are talking up what Paisley has to offer.

Cabinet Secretary for Culture, Tourism and External Affairs Fiona Hyslop said: “Paisley makes a significant contribution to Scotland’s rich cultural life, with both historic built heritage and modern design.

“The local and national boost that being UK City of Culture 2021 would bring is an exciting prospect and I am pleased Paisley’s cultural journey and interests continue in this competition.”

Scottish Secretary David Mundell said: “I am delighted Paisley has been shortlisted for the UK City of Culture 2021. This is a superb opportunity to stimulate Paisley’s vibrant culture, generate new jobs and boost the local economy.

“While I must remain rigorously impartial, I can’t help but think the town that has given the world the Paisley Pattern, Paolo Nutini and David Tennant deserves something in return. I wish all those involved the very best of luck.”

Scottish Labour leader Kezia Dugdale said: “Culture can transform the lives of many, including those in poverty, and supports people to develop new skills and build confidence in order to compete for the jobs of the future.

“I’ve long been a supporter of Paisley’s bid and I hope it makes it all the way and becomes the UK City of Culture 2021.”

Paisley’s bid is taking place as part of a wider push to use the town’s internationally-significant story to make it a key visitor destination within Scotland, and tourism chiefs were quick to talk the town up.

VisitScotland Chief Executive, Malcolm Roughead, said: “This is fantastic news for both the town and for Scotland. This is a highly-competitive process and to have made it this far is testament to the hard work and dedication of the team to showcase the town’s wonderful cultural offering.

“Scotland is the perfect stage for cultural events and Paisley already has a number of events already taking place, including The Spree and Weave Festival, that celebrate the town’s wonderful culture and heritage.

“It is this unique culture and heritage that will provide the ideal platform for them to build a wider programme of events and activities to engage with all its communities and the UK while ultimately transform its future.

“This is a highly coveted title and competition will be fierce, however, Paisley has much to offer and I know they will make the most of this opportunity. They have our full support and I wish them the best of luck ahead of the final decision.”

The news was also greeted with delight locally, with Paisley’s MSP George Adam issuing a call for the whole country to get behind the town, adding: “This is fantastic news for our town and is down to the great work of bid director Jean Cameron and her team.

“The people of Paisley have embraced this bid and have played an enormous part so far.  Paisley’s bid has now become Scotland’s bid and Team Paisley has now become Team Scotland.

“Over the next few months Paisley will be putting everything into bringing the title back to our great town.”

For more information on Paisley’s bid to be UK City of Culture, see paisley2021.co.uk

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‘Thank you’ to town as Paisley sole Scottish bidder on UK City of Culture 2021 shortlist

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The team behind Paisley’s bid to be UK City of Culture 2021 have thanked the people of the town for their ‘incredible contribution’ after Paisley was named as the sole Scottish place on the shortlist for the next stage of the competition.

Paisley City of Culture 2021

 

The UK Government’s Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport have confirmed the 11 places bidding for the title has been whittled down to just five – Paisley, Coventry, Stoke, Sunderland and Swansea.

Initial bids were lodged in April – the five selected are due to submit more detailed second-stage bids by the end of September, with the winner announced at the end of the year.

Paisley is bidding for the title as part of a wider push to use the town’s unique heritage and cultural story as the home of the globally-recognised Paisley Pattern to transform its future.

It is estimated Paisley’s 2021 year could bring a £172m economic boost and create the equivalent of 4,700 jobs over a ten-year period.

Current UK City of Culture hosts Hull has seen £1 billion of investment since winning the title in 2013, with the city attracting 1.4m visitors in just the first three months of its year in the spotlight.

And the shortlist news has been hailed by the team behind Paisley’s bid as a massive thumbs-up for the town and its ambitions.

Renfrewshire Council Leader Iain Nicolson – chair of the Paisley 2021 Partnership Board – said: “For the judges to have shortlisted us is a major endorsement of our ambitions for Paisley and Renfrewshire – and we are in it to win it.

“I know local people will be absolutely thrilled at this news – we want to thank every one of them as they are the ones whose incredible contribution made it happen.

“They turned the bid into a mass movement, with more than 30,000 people joining the conversation – a number equivalent to almost half the town’s population.

“Winning the UK City of Culture 2021 title would be a major boost to our wider plans.

“Aside from hosting some of the world’s best performers and bringing more than a million people to Paisley in 2021, it would over the long term create thousands of new jobs, and allow us to attract massive investment and build a new town centre economy with tourism and creativity at its heart.

“We wish the best of luck to the other places which join us on the shortlist, and send our best wishes to those which didn’t make it through.”

Paisley 2021 bid director Jean Cameron added: “This is a wonderful piece of news. A huge number of people worked so hard to get us to this stage and we want to thank every one of them…from Paisley Buddies to our friends across Scotland, the UK and further afield.

“There’s never been a Scottish winner and we would be thrilled to be the first – we are now Scotland’s bid and would love to see the whole country get behind us.

“The work to date has already been really positive for Paisley – it taken awareness of our internationally-significant story to a new level and changed perceptions of the town.

“It has also brought a new sense of self-confidence to residents and shown them how the power of culture can be harnessed to change people’s lives for the better.

“Our £1m Culture, Heritage and Events Fund has boosted our local cultural scene and linked local groups with some of Scotland’s best creative talent – building a foundation for our 2021 year.

“The initial bid was the product of a wide range of local groups – community and cultural organisations, schools and young people, businesses and the council – all working together on a shared vision to change the area’s future.

“Paisley will build on that over the next few months as we look to further convince the judges that the town wants the title, needs the title, and will deliver a year of world-class culture in 2021.”

Paisley’s bid to be UK City of Culture 2021 has enjoyed the following highlights over the past 20 months:

– the creation of a £1m Renfrewshire Culture, Heritage and Events Fund aimed at boosting the local creative scene and creating partnerships with national artists. Funded projects include a series of gable-end artwork murals around the town, and a stop-motion Lego animation now seen by millions of people around the world;

– more than 30,000 people joining the conversation which helped shape the bid, including a specially-commissioned children’s story inviting every primary school child in Renfrewshire to submit ideas;

– backing from cultural figures from the town including singer Paolo Nutini, actor Gerard Butler, artist John Byrne and designer Pam Hogg;

– major events including the British Pipe Band Championships, Scotland’s largest beer festival, and the Scottish Album of the Year Award, with The Spree arts festival taking place later this year.

Work is under way in the town on new cultural infrastructure – including a proposed £42m revamp of Paisley museum and a new museum store and library on the town’s high street – as well as work to reconnect the Pattern back to the town which gave it its name via partnerships with international design houses.

For more information on Paisley’s bid to be UK City of Culture 2021, see paisley2021.co.uk