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Brothers team up for first joint art exhibition

AN art exhibition featuring the work of two Paisley-born brothers, Kevin and Dermott Egan has opened in the town’s Museum and Art Galleries.

Kevin Egan and his brother, Dermott at their art exhibition in Paisley Museum and Art Galleries.

Much of the brothers’ paintings, drawings, carvings and sculptures relate to their working class roots growing up in both Paisley’s Ferguslie Park and Glenburn housing schemes.

The free exhibition, Form and Colour: A Way of Being in the World, runs until February 26.

Kevin, 61 and 57-year-old Dermott come from a very creative family. Their brother Tommy was a well-known folk singer locally and their late brother, Jim was also an accomplished singer of folk music and popular standards of the 1950s and 60s, appearing on radio and television.

Another brother, Joe enjoyed chart success in the music business as one half of the band, Stealer’s Wheel along with fellow-Paisley singer-songwriter, Gerry Rafferty.

Following a college course in commercial art, Dermott worked for different artistic agencies producing posters for venues like The Pavilion and King’s Theatres, in Glasgow. Some of his early artistic work in this field can be found in the Mitchell Library archive.

Kevin’s early work was in polychrome bas relief and free standing sculpture. His relief carvings – produced for the Marquis of Bute – can still be seen at Mount Stuart House, on the Isle of Bute. One of these particular pieces was shortlisted for the Saltire Prize.

Kevin said: “All our family were good at art and at the same time all of us, including Dermott and I were also musical and could sing.
“I suspect that on a subconscious level, Dermott and I decided to take the road of painting, drawing and sculpture, so as not to compete with our older brothers.
“When you’re in such a big family you try to find your own place to be creative and we choose art.”
Dermott adds: “Almost all of my art and much of Kevin’s is based on Paisley and the worthies we knew when we were growing up.
“This is our first joint exhibition and we hope that when people come along they bring their imagination with them and share some of the unexpected discoveries we have made while creating our art.”

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Paisley ready to bid as UK City of Culture competition launches

The team behind Paisley’s bid to be UK City of Culture say the town will be ready to host the 2021title – after the UK Government today fired the starting gun on the competition.

Paisley Town Hall lit up in support of the bid

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport today formally launched the 2021 competition, with bids due in for 28 April, and the winner to be announced at the end of the year.

The guidelines were announced by Minister for Digital and Culture Matt Hancock MP during a visit to Hull, the current holders of the title, which runs every four years.

Paisley’s unique assets include the globally-recognised Paisley Pattern, Scotland’s second-highest concentration of listed buildings, and an internationally significant museum collection, including the world’s largest collection of Paisley shawls.

The town also offers a thriving contemporary cultural scene, a highly-regarded university, international airport, and PACE, one of the UK’s largest youth theatre groups.

Paisley officially launched its intention to bid in November 2015 and the year since has seen an outpouring of support from the local community and beyond, including:

– more than 8,000 local people taking part in conversations around the bid;

– messages of support from homegrown cultural icons such as singer Paolo Nutini and playwright John Byrne;

– backing from more than 100 businesses, including Glasgow Airport, intu Braehead and the University of the West of Scotland;

– 70 million opportunities to see or hear something positive about Paisley, helping change perceptions and the tone of conversation about the town;

– cross-party political support, with an event at Westminster and one of the best –attended parliamentary receptions in the history of the Scottish Parliament;

Councillor Mark Macmillan, chair of the Paisley 2021 partnership board and Renfrewshire Council Leader, said: “We would like to thank DCMS for giving us the chance to bid for this title – we hope to use it to transform the area’s fortunes, bringing massive economic benefits and a lasting social and cultural legacy.

“The first week of Hull’s UK City of Culture year saw 342,000 visitors to the city – that is scale of boost this title could bring.

“Paisley’s name was once carried across the world thanks to the Pattern and its status as the one-time home of the global thread industry – for its size, the town’s contribution to the world has been massive.

“This bid will retell Paisley’s unique story to the world, while showing the judges Paisley wants the title, needs the title and can deliver it.”

Jean Cameron, Paisley 2021 Bid Director, added: “Over the past year we have had wonderful backing from the people of Paisley – and our thriving creative community has been at the heart of that.

“In that time we have seen a new sense of confidence and awareness of everything Paisley has to offer – and we will distil that into a bid which shows DCMS how we plan to harness the power of culture to make people’s lives better.

“We would also like to wish all the best to all the other cities who will be joining us on the bidding journey.”

Amanda McMillan, managing director of Glasgow Airport, said: “Securing UK City of Culture status would have a hugely positive effect on Paisley and everyone at Glasgow Airport is fully behind the bid.

“As well as providing a nationwide platform to showcase the town’s rich cultural heritage, it would also create a legacy of enduring civic pride for the people of Paisley.

“There’s no doubt a successful bid would play a significant role in boosting inbound tourism, so having an international airport serving more than nine million passengers just minutes from the town centre can only be to Paisley’s advantage.

“We hope our continued support can help play a part and wish the bid team good luck.”

Professor Craig Mahoney, Principal and Vice-Chancellor of University of the West of Scotland (UWS), said: “UWS is extremely proud to be one of the key partners of Paisley 2021.

“The university has already contributed to a number of initiatives related to the bid including an innovative digital art exhibition at Paisley Museum, which was commissioned by UWS in support of the bid.

“University staff are also playing an integral part in bid planning and delivery. We are excited about being part of the process and continuing to work with our partners to showcase Paisley.”

David Wallace, managing director of PACE theatre company and chair of the Creative Renfrewshire Network said, “The past year has been phenomenal in terms of taking pride in and perceptions of Paisley to a new level.

“The young people in the company now talk excitedly about their town and the competition launch brings their dream of a creative future one step closer.”

Although Paisley is not a city, the competition is open to large towns and urban areas, so as Scotland’s largest town, Paisley is equipped to apply and win.

Gavin Newlands, MP for Paisley and Renfrewshire North, said:

“The firing gun has now been fired and the race to be named UK City of Culture in 2021 can now truly begin.

“The team behind Paisley’s bid to be named UK City of Culture 2021 have been working hard for the past year, showcasing everything that our town has to offer and detailing the transformational impact that would come from Paisley being awarded this prestigious title.

“I know from my work promoting the town in Westminster that there is a lot of interest in Paisley, and I will continue to do everything in my power to help Paisley being awarded the title of UK City of Culture 2021.”

For more information about Paisley’s bid, see www.paisley2021.co.uk

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2017 programme of the PAI

2017 programme of the Paisley Art Institute.  Come back soon as more details to follow.

Both exhibitions will be shown in the familiar venue of Paisley Museum and Art Galleries

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Paisley to host Scots Trad Music Awards in 2017

The Scots Trad Music Awards are to be held in Paisley in December 2017 for the first time.

The news was announced by event founder Simon Thoumire at this year’s Gala Concert and Awards Ceremony in Caird Hall, Dundee on Saturday, December 3.

2016-12-05_14-34-48
The BBC MG ALBA Scots Trad Awards are considered a major highlight in the traditional music calendar. The aim of the annual awards is to highlight Scotland’s wonderful traditional music in all its forms and to create a high profile opportunity that will shine a light on talent as well as the industry in general.

From its inception in 2003, the awards have steadily grown in popularity and prestige attracting television coverage by BBC ALBA in 2007 and major sponsorship from MG ALBA in 2008. This year’s awards will be broadcast to the world (via bbc.co.uk/alba) and it is hoped this will afford Scotland’s largest town an opportunity to share news of its bid to become UK City of Culture 2021 with a global audience.  

The is also further evidence that Paisley is capable of hosting high profile music events – it hosted both the British Pipe Band Championships and the Scottish Album of the Year Awards this year, with both returning in 2017.  

It is also proof of Paisley’s burgeoning music scene. Renfrewshire’s talents have featured heavily in the BBC MG ALBA Scots Trad Awards in recent years with The Scott Wood Band nominated for ‘Folk Band of the Year’ in 2014 while Johnstone Pipe Band are in contention for ‘Pipe Band of the Year’ this year (see separate release for results).

Simon Thoumire said, “Hands Up for Trad are really delighted that the 2017 Scots Trad Music Awards will be hosted by Paisley, currently bidding for the UK City of Culture title in 2021, home of The Spree, and the birth place of some of Scotland’s finest musical talent. We’re really looking forward to working with Renfrewshire Council to make the Scots Trad Music Awards in 2017 the best yet“.

Welcoming the Trad Awards announcement, Renfrewshire Council leader, Mark Macmillan, said, “We are delighted to be hosting the Trad Awards in 2017 and look forward to welcoming fans from all over the world. Paisley’s music scene is thriving, offering formal concerts and more impromptu gigs in local cafes, bars and restaurants, as organisers grow in confidence. Add several major music events in 2017 and the reasons to visit have grown enormously.”                      

For more information on the Scots Trad Music Awards visit: https://projects.handsupfortrad.scot/scotstradmusicawards/

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This months events at THE BUNGLOW

Friday 2nd December:

What’s On: RadioLa & Fantanas
Genre: Soft Rock

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Saturday 3rd December:

What’s On:  Bootleg Beatnik & The Backscratchers + Andy Hamilton

Genre: Blues

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Sunday 4th December:

What’s On: Open Mic Night

Genre: Any

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Wednesday 7th December:

What’s On: The Ultimate Music Quiz

Genre: All Genres

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Thursday 8th December:

What’s On: Retro Games Night

Genre: Does PacMan Count?

Time: 6pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Friday 9th December:

What’s On: Gunz N’ Rozes Scotland + AWOL

Genre: Rock

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Entry: £3.00 (on the door)

Age: 18+

Saturday 10th December:

What’s On: Devil’s Queen, Tantrum & Civil Punk
Genre: Rock

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Sunday 11th December:

What’s On: Open Mic Night
Genre: Any

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: Free

Age 18+

Wednesday 14th December:

What’s On: The Ultimate Music Quiz

Genre: Any

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Thursday 15th December:

What’s On: Retro Games Night

Genre: We’re sure Kerplunk is available?

Time: 6pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Friday 16th December:

What’s On: All or Nothing with The Redstarts

Genre: Ska/Mod/Punk

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Entry: £3.00 on the door.

Age: 18+

Saturday 17th December:

What’s On: The Monitors Christmas Party

Genre: Punk/Rock

Time: 8pm
Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am
Entry: Free
Age: 18+

Sunday 18th December:
What’s On: Open Mic Night
Genre: Any

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Wednesday 21st December:

What’s On: The Ultimate Music Crimbo Quiz

Genre: Any

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Thursday 22nd December:

What’s On: Catholic Action, Sway & Pinact
Genre: Alternative

Time: 7pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: £5.00
Age: 18+

Friday 23rd December:

What’s On: Messa O’Blues
Genre: Blues

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Saturday 24th December:

What’s On: The Xmas Eve Bash with Snakeskin Boogie

Genre: Funk/Bluegrass/Blues

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Sunday 25th December:

WE’RE CLOSED

Monday 26th December :

What’s On: Boxing Day Open Mic and Leftovers

Genre: Any

Time: 8pm
Opening Hours:  6pm – 1am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Wednesday 28th December:

What’s On: The Ultimate Music Quiz

Genre: Any

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 1am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Thursday 29th December:

What’s On: Xmas Jumper Jamboree with Delphi. Lemonhaze & The Asuras

Genre: Alternative/Indie

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 1am

Entry: £3.00 on the door

Age: 18+

Friday 30th December:

What’s On: TBC

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Saturday 31st December:

What’s On: New Year’s Eve Party with Freespeech & Piper

Genre: Rock/Pop/Scottish

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Entry: £5.00 Tickets & On the door

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This week in the Hoose

Upcoming events in the Hoose – see flyer for details.

this-week

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“Star” Paisley Museum Burns manuscript to go on show every January

An original Burns manuscript that has been in Paisley Museum and Art Gallery’s collection for almost 100 years, but was only recently rediscovered and authenticated, is to go on display in the museum every January when light levels are low enough to protect the delicate ink on paper artifact, and to coincide with Burns Night.

burns-letter-paisley-museum

Announcing the month-long exhibit in 2017 (January 17 – February 19) for St. Andrew’s Day (November 30), Renfrewshire Leisure chair, Councillor Jim Harte, said, “I am absolutely delighted that the only existing manuscript of a lovely piece of Burns social verse will be on display in Paisley Museum in the New Year for a limited period and each subsequent January thereafter.

“We are proud to possess this charming piece and thrilled to share it with visitors during what is an extremely important time for Scotland’s largest town. We will be finalising Paisley’s bid for the title UK City of Culture 2021 during the early part of 2017 and this fantastic exhibit reveals yet another layer to our fascinating culture.”

The short verse, written in reply to a party invitation, is in typical Burns style  including wordplay – he combines the tradition for indicating the day of writing with something that suggests he is worse for wear, in “Foorsday”; highlights his joy at the invite, and pledges his attendance whether by horse, or by cart.

The artifact was verified in a letter to the Museum last year by Professor Gerard Carruthers of the Centre for Robert Burns Studies at the University of Glasgow. He said:

“The manuscript is clearly in the handwriting of Robert Burns. The ink and paper are a good match to other authentic Burns manuscript productions. 

“The poem dates from 1785 – 1786. The first publication to give an indication of its origins, and how it came to be in the collection of Paisley Library is ‘The Works of Robert Burns Volumes 1 – 5’ edited by The Ettrick Shepherd and William Motherwell. Motherwell was Secretary of the Paisley Burns Club in 1819 and became President in 1821. This puts him at the centre of Paisley literary life when the poem first surfaces. Motherwell noted that, ‘We are informed it was presented to the library by the late Mr. John Clarkson, of McGavin and Clarkson, threadmakers, Paisley’.”

The manuscript will be displayed alongside a portrait of Burns by James Tannock (1784 – 1862) also in Paisley Museum’s collection. Born in Kilmarnock, Tannock was originally a house painter, but after lessons from Alexander Nasmyth – who was a friend of Burns – became a successful portrait painter.

 

The manuscript reads:

Sir,

Yours this moment I unseal,

And faith I’m gay and hearty!

To tell the truth and shame the deil,

I am as fou as Bartie:

But Foorsday, sir, my promise leal,

Expect me o’ your partie,

If on a beastie I can speel

Or hurl in a cartie.

Yours,

Robert Burns

 

Machlin,

Monday Night, 10 o’clock

For more information on Paisley Museum visit www.renfrewshireleisure.com

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FREE weekend parking at Piazza

As part of the re-opening of our refurbished car park, we are offering free weekend parking until the end of December 2016.  Opening hours at the Piazza are:  Mon – Sat 8.00am to 6.30pm and Sun 11am to 5pm.

 

piazza

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Return of Mòd would bring economic boost

Paisley could be set for a six-figure economic boost if it can bring Scotland’s primary celebration of Gaelic language and culture back to the town in 2021.

action from the parade when the Mod last came to Paisley in 2013

action from the parade when the Mod last came to Paisley in 2013

Work to on a bid bring The Royal National Mòd back to the town is well advanced, with financial plans being put in place to cover the expected costs.

If the bid is successful, the nine-day festival would become a key part of the proposed programme for Paisley’s UK City of Culture 2021 bid.

Members of Renfrewshire Council’s Leadership Board will next week be asked to set aside a budget of £300,000 to meet event hosting costs, plus £12,500 per year for four years to fund a programme of Gaelic language events locally.

An independent analysis of Paisley previous hosting of the Mòd in 2013 found it attracted more than 8,000 visitors, 38% from outwith the area, and with total visitor spending of £700,000.

The same report found the return on Renfrewshire Council’s investment was six to one, and the economic activity was the equivalent of 33 full-time jobs.

Public meetings have already taken place to create a local organising committee, which – with support by council staff – will submit a bid by June.

Paisley’s Mòd ambitions have been supported by prominent Gaelic musicians Donnie Munro and Skerryvore, who both played the town’s Spree festival this year.

The town has also started to build a Gaelic legacy with an annual festival for under-18s – Fèis Phàislig – running each summer and which this year saw almost 100 young people take part in a week of musical workshops.

Renfrewshire Council Leader Mark Macmillan said: “We were delighted to bring the Mòd to Paisley for the first time three years ago – and I am sure residents will remember how busy the town was during that week.

“Hosting the Mòd again in 2021 would bring another massive economic boost to the Renfrewshire area.

“If we win UK City of Culture 2021 it would be a key part of the year-long programme of major events that would involve.

“But even if not it will help us maintain the momentum the 2021 bid has already created in terms of establishing Paisley as a key destination on Scotland’s cultural map.

“It would also allow us to create an even stronger Gaelic cultural legacy within Renfrewshire, building on the good work already being done.”

The Leadership Board will consider the plans when it meets on Wednesday 30 November.

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SCOTLAND’S LARGEST COLLEGE IN STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP WITH RENFREWSHIRE

West College Scotland will use its size, expertise and presence to help further improve job opportunities for the people of Renfrewshire, increase the life chances of everyone living in local communities and assist the regeneration Paisley town centre.

College Principal and Chief Executive Audrey Cumberford and Renfrewshire Council Leader Mark Macmillan.

College Principal and Chief Executive Audrey Cumberford and Renfrewshire Council Leader Mark Macmillan.

The College has entered into a Strategic Partnership with Renfrewshire Council, designed to maximise both organisations’ support for each other’s main objectives.  While both have worked closely for many years, the new partnership outlines areas for even deeper co-operation.

Speaking at a launch event, College Principal and Chief Executive, Audrey Cumberford, said:

“As Scotland’s largest college, we are well-placed to bring the benefits of first-class training and education to the people of Renfrewshire.  We believe education is the foundation stone upon which so much else is built.

“In particular, we see ourselves as educational innovators, using modern technologies to allow the people of Renfrewshire to secure good, well-paid jobs and contribute to the local economy. We will give local people access to those digital technologies which are already transforming our lives and work.

“We also believe that we have a role in closing the educational attainment gap between the better- and less-well-off areas of Renfrewshire.

“Getting this right means we are helping Renfrewshire Council meet two of their most important objectives: creating jobs and tackling poverty.”

Renfrewshire Council Leader Mark Macmillan said:  “People see the positive changes that are underway in Renfrewshire – Paisley’s bid to be UK City of Culture 2021, Renfrewshire’s role at the heart of the £1.13billion Glasgow City Region City Deal, and the regeneration of our town centres.

“The challenge facing all of us is to make sure all of our people and communities have the chance to take advantage of these opportunities.

“West College Scotland is leading the way on delivering those shared priorities – particularly in areas such as digital skills, raising attainment and boosting innovation.  The new strategic partnership will strengthen that cooperation and achievement.”