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A FIRST FOR PAISLEY FIRST

Paisley is set to become the first Business Improvement District (BID) in Scotland to have a gable end transformed into a giant mural.

The work highlights one of the town’s most eminent yet relatively unknown sons, Alexander Wilson, as well as iconic buildings and local wildlife.

Paisley First, the regeneration group tasked with breathing new life into the town centre, have launched the project to enhance the town’s image and tap into the creative potential in Renfrewshire.

A number of walls have been identified for the murals which form part of a series and the first is situated at Johnston Street. It depicts a beautiful kingfisher perched next to thread woven in between the branches, while the distinctive Coats Memorial Church appears in the background.

The kingfisher, a bird that can sometimes be spotted on the Cart, represents the life and work of Paisley’s Alexander Wilson, who is credited worldwide with establishing ornithology as a science. Originally a weaver poet, Alexander Wilson moved to America where he studied wildlife and travelled widely, documenting and drawing hundreds of illustrations of birds.

The Coats Memorial Church, an iconic part of Paisley’s skyline, was built in memory of Thomas Coats, founder of the town’s biggest thread firm.

This mural is designed to amalgamate just some of Paisley’s rich historical and cultural past.

Paisley artists Mark Worst, 26, and Ross Dinnett, 25, have just painted the three-storey mural and have undergone special safety training specifically for the job.

Mark said: “At 16m, this is one of the highest murals I’ve ever painted and it’s certainly the most unusual. Ross and I had to do training to operate the scissors lift to get up and down the gable end. It’s some height up there. “

Paisley First project leader, Melanie Hughes, who has developed this wall concept with the artists from the start said: “Thanks to additional funding from Renfrewshire’s Cultural Events and Heritage Fund this is going to be the first of many murals in Paisley’s town centre. We’re excited to see the reaction from the local community and town centre businesses.”

Paisley First Chairman, Ian Henderson stated,

“This should help make the town centre more appealing to potential businesses and visitors, as well as to Buddies themselves.”

“It’s a project that will help breathe new life into the town and hopefully, raise its profile. Ultimately, we want this project to increase footfall and encourage people to spend money in local businesses.”

Melanie added: “By utilising the best of Paisley’s artistic talent we hope to create a colourful and vibrant town centre that people want to visit. In the future, we’d like to involve more people in the process by collaborating with community groups too.”

Ian said: “We asked local artists to submit their proposals for various locations around the town and we’ve had some terrific entries.”

“Some of Mark’s work can already be seen around the town in places such as Brown’s Lane where he has painted a spectacular mural on the outside wall of The Bungalow featuring Jimi Hendrix and John Lennon.”

“He has also painted another mural on one of the walls of the beer garden at the popular Paisley pub DeBeers and produced the art work on the shutters of the music shop in Causeyside Street. “

Train travellers in Glasgow might also have noticed his city mural which was placed on huge boards at Queen Street Station while the main line to Edinburgh was being renovated recently.

Mark’s talents have also taken him abroad where he has also collaborated with other mural artists in Europe.

Paisley First would like to acknowledge the help and support they have received from Paisley Housing Association and its tenants who have been kind enough to allow us to use their gable end.”

A spokeswoman for the association said: “We are delighted to support the installation of this mural which will bring beauty and energy to the local area. This statement piece showcases local artists and celebrates Alexander Wilson, his life and work, and his special place in the rich history of Paisley. “

“The association is committed to continuing its tradition of regeneration and improvement which boosts the local community and this Paisley First initiative is going to have a real positive impact on the town centre.”

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Paisley to Monte Carlo Classic Rally Photographs

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Calm Point acupuncture

Did you know that ear acupuncture can help with so many health related conditions and that a treatment typically lasts just 30-45 minutes?

CalmPoint Acupuncture, located close to the centre of Paisley, offers a free initial consultation. Find out more in CalmPoint’s latest video

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Cars set to depart Paisley for historic Monte Carlo Rally

The clock is ticking to the start of the 2017 historic Monte Carlo Rally when up to eighty cars will be flagged away from the centre of Paisley.

Drivers from the Monte Carlo rally with Renfrewshire’s Provost Anne Hall in Paisley’s Fountain Gardens today

It’s the fourth time the town – which is bidding to be UK City of Culture 2021 – is the only British start point out of seven European cities including Stockholm, Lisbon and Barcelona, for the 1300-mile trip to the South of France.

A stunning range of classic cars will leave the start ramp outside Paisley Abbey at 6pm tomorrow (Wednesday January 25th) in three separate categories.

The Historique class is being run for the 20th year and is restricted to car models which competed in the Monte Carlo Rallies between 1955 and 1980. It will take place over eight days on open public roads with the cars and crews undertaking a series of fourteen demanding test stages in the mountains of southern France.

Included in the line-up will be an ex-BMC works Mini Cooper S which competed in the Monte Carlo Rally 50 years ago, finishing 6th overall in the hands of rally legend Paddy Hopkirk.

The Classique event is for older cars from as early as 1911 to 1980 and follows the same route to Monte Carlo but does not include any test stages.

Among the cars in this category are a 1930 Austin 7 Ulster open 2-seater sports and a Sunbeam Stiletto, built nearby at the Linwood car plant and looks as good as it did when it rolled off the production line in 1968.

Once again the event will also feature the popular Monte Heritage Runs which will take in a series of short classic routes in Scotland.

Last year a crowd of more than 10,000 gathered in the centre of Paisley with the magnificent backdrop of the Abbey to wave off the crews in a party atmosphere with lights, music, street food and pyrotechnics.

Working with staff from Renfrewshire Council and volunteers from many motorsport clubs in Scotland, the organisers expect this year’s start to be even bigger and better.

The council has laid on a programme of entertainment, which starts at 4pm, and includes car-themed arts and crafts, street entertainment and music from Pulse FM

Final preparations are now being completed and Douglas Anderson, the UK co-ordinator and the man responsible for bringing the Monte back to Scotland in 2011 believes this year will be the best yet.

He said: “This year’s Monte start has all the ingredients to make it a unique mid-winter festival which is guaranteed to lift the spirits of all the folk from Paisley and beyond who come along each year to enjoy the wonderful carnival atmosphere.”

Douglas will also be doing the trip to the Mediterranean in his MG Midget which will run ahead of the group as the official opening car.

He joined some of the entrants who’ll be heading off on Burns Night as they proudly posed with their cars in the shadow of a statue of the Bard in Paisley’s Fountain Gardens

Against the striking backdrop of the park’s A-listed ornate Victorian-era fountain was Paddy Hopkirk’s Mini, Cuthbert the Rover, a Volvo Amazon and a branded Paisley for UK City of Culture 2021 Sunbeam which will also be making the run to Monte Carlo.

The event is being supported by Renfrewshire Council. Provost Anne Hall said: “We are thrilled to be welcoming the Monte Carlo Classic Rally back to Paisley for the fourth year in a row.

“Hosting such a truly international event as this is really helping to put Paisley on the map ahead of the town’s bid for UK City of Culture 2021 being submitted in a couple of months.

“Paisley Abbey always makes a fantastic backdrop for the spectacle of these classic cars setting off for France.

“The people of Renfrewshire have given the event great backing in previous years as they turn out in their numbers to wave them off and I am sure they will again – I’m looking forward to being part of another memorable night.”

Tomorrow afternoon, the cars have to undergo strict scrutineering checks to make sure they comply with the Rally’s regulations. Among those casting a careful eye over the cars will be apprentices at GTG Training in Glasgow.
Ian Taylor, Group Operations Manager at GTG said:”It’s wonderful to once again have the Monte Carlo Rally cars here. Our apprentices look forward to working with the cars which gives them fantastic, hands-on experience. We wish all cars and drivers taking part this year the very best of luck”.

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Brothers team up for first joint art exhibition

AN art exhibition featuring the work of two Paisley-born brothers, Kevin and Dermott Egan has opened in the town’s Museum and Art Galleries.

Kevin Egan and his brother, Dermott at their art exhibition in Paisley Museum and Art Galleries.

Much of the brothers’ paintings, drawings, carvings and sculptures relate to their working class roots growing up in both Paisley’s Ferguslie Park and Glenburn housing schemes.

The free exhibition, Form and Colour: A Way of Being in the World, runs until February 26.

Kevin, 61 and 57-year-old Dermott come from a very creative family. Their brother Tommy was a well-known folk singer locally and their late brother, Jim was also an accomplished singer of folk music and popular standards of the 1950s and 60s, appearing on radio and television.

Another brother, Joe enjoyed chart success in the music business as one half of the band, Stealer’s Wheel along with fellow-Paisley singer-songwriter, Gerry Rafferty.

Following a college course in commercial art, Dermott worked for different artistic agencies producing posters for venues like The Pavilion and King’s Theatres, in Glasgow. Some of his early artistic work in this field can be found in the Mitchell Library archive.

Kevin’s early work was in polychrome bas relief and free standing sculpture. His relief carvings – produced for the Marquis of Bute – can still be seen at Mount Stuart House, on the Isle of Bute. One of these particular pieces was shortlisted for the Saltire Prize.

Kevin said: “All our family were good at art and at the same time all of us, including Dermott and I were also musical and could sing.
“I suspect that on a subconscious level, Dermott and I decided to take the road of painting, drawing and sculpture, so as not to compete with our older brothers.
“When you’re in such a big family you try to find your own place to be creative and we choose art.”
Dermott adds: “Almost all of my art and much of Kevin’s is based on Paisley and the worthies we knew when we were growing up.
“This is our first joint exhibition and we hope that when people come along they bring their imagination with them and share some of the unexpected discoveries we have made while creating our art.”

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Paisley ready to bid as UK City of Culture competition launches

The team behind Paisley’s bid to be UK City of Culture say the town will be ready to host the 2021title – after the UK Government today fired the starting gun on the competition.

Paisley Town Hall lit up in support of the bid

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport today formally launched the 2021 competition, with bids due in for 28 April, and the winner to be announced at the end of the year.

The guidelines were announced by Minister for Digital and Culture Matt Hancock MP during a visit to Hull, the current holders of the title, which runs every four years.

Paisley’s unique assets include the globally-recognised Paisley Pattern, Scotland’s second-highest concentration of listed buildings, and an internationally significant museum collection, including the world’s largest collection of Paisley shawls.

The town also offers a thriving contemporary cultural scene, a highly-regarded university, international airport, and PACE, one of the UK’s largest youth theatre groups.

Paisley officially launched its intention to bid in November 2015 and the year since has seen an outpouring of support from the local community and beyond, including:

– more than 8,000 local people taking part in conversations around the bid;

– messages of support from homegrown cultural icons such as singer Paolo Nutini and playwright John Byrne;

– backing from more than 100 businesses, including Glasgow Airport, intu Braehead and the University of the West of Scotland;

– 70 million opportunities to see or hear something positive about Paisley, helping change perceptions and the tone of conversation about the town;

– cross-party political support, with an event at Westminster and one of the best –attended parliamentary receptions in the history of the Scottish Parliament;

Councillor Mark Macmillan, chair of the Paisley 2021 partnership board and Renfrewshire Council Leader, said: “We would like to thank DCMS for giving us the chance to bid for this title – we hope to use it to transform the area’s fortunes, bringing massive economic benefits and a lasting social and cultural legacy.

“The first week of Hull’s UK City of Culture year saw 342,000 visitors to the city – that is scale of boost this title could bring.

“Paisley’s name was once carried across the world thanks to the Pattern and its status as the one-time home of the global thread industry – for its size, the town’s contribution to the world has been massive.

“This bid will retell Paisley’s unique story to the world, while showing the judges Paisley wants the title, needs the title and can deliver it.”

Jean Cameron, Paisley 2021 Bid Director, added: “Over the past year we have had wonderful backing from the people of Paisley – and our thriving creative community has been at the heart of that.

“In that time we have seen a new sense of confidence and awareness of everything Paisley has to offer – and we will distil that into a bid which shows DCMS how we plan to harness the power of culture to make people’s lives better.

“We would also like to wish all the best to all the other cities who will be joining us on the bidding journey.”

Amanda McMillan, managing director of Glasgow Airport, said: “Securing UK City of Culture status would have a hugely positive effect on Paisley and everyone at Glasgow Airport is fully behind the bid.

“As well as providing a nationwide platform to showcase the town’s rich cultural heritage, it would also create a legacy of enduring civic pride for the people of Paisley.

“There’s no doubt a successful bid would play a significant role in boosting inbound tourism, so having an international airport serving more than nine million passengers just minutes from the town centre can only be to Paisley’s advantage.

“We hope our continued support can help play a part and wish the bid team good luck.”

Professor Craig Mahoney, Principal and Vice-Chancellor of University of the West of Scotland (UWS), said: “UWS is extremely proud to be one of the key partners of Paisley 2021.

“The university has already contributed to a number of initiatives related to the bid including an innovative digital art exhibition at Paisley Museum, which was commissioned by UWS in support of the bid.

“University staff are also playing an integral part in bid planning and delivery. We are excited about being part of the process and continuing to work with our partners to showcase Paisley.”

David Wallace, managing director of PACE theatre company and chair of the Creative Renfrewshire Network said, “The past year has been phenomenal in terms of taking pride in and perceptions of Paisley to a new level.

“The young people in the company now talk excitedly about their town and the competition launch brings their dream of a creative future one step closer.”

Although Paisley is not a city, the competition is open to large towns and urban areas, so as Scotland’s largest town, Paisley is equipped to apply and win.

Gavin Newlands, MP for Paisley and Renfrewshire North, said:

“The firing gun has now been fired and the race to be named UK City of Culture in 2021 can now truly begin.

“The team behind Paisley’s bid to be named UK City of Culture 2021 have been working hard for the past year, showcasing everything that our town has to offer and detailing the transformational impact that would come from Paisley being awarded this prestigious title.

“I know from my work promoting the town in Westminster that there is a lot of interest in Paisley, and I will continue to do everything in my power to help Paisley being awarded the title of UK City of Culture 2021.”

For more information about Paisley’s bid, see www.paisley2021.co.uk

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2017 programme of the PAI

2017 programme of the Paisley Art Institute.  Come back soon as more details to follow.

Both exhibitions will be shown in the familiar venue of Paisley Museum and Art Galleries

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Paisley to host Scots Trad Music Awards in 2017

The Scots Trad Music Awards are to be held in Paisley in December 2017 for the first time.

The news was announced by event founder Simon Thoumire at this year’s Gala Concert and Awards Ceremony in Caird Hall, Dundee on Saturday, December 3.

2016-12-05_14-34-48
The BBC MG ALBA Scots Trad Awards are considered a major highlight in the traditional music calendar. The aim of the annual awards is to highlight Scotland’s wonderful traditional music in all its forms and to create a high profile opportunity that will shine a light on talent as well as the industry in general.

From its inception in 2003, the awards have steadily grown in popularity and prestige attracting television coverage by BBC ALBA in 2007 and major sponsorship from MG ALBA in 2008. This year’s awards will be broadcast to the world (via bbc.co.uk/alba) and it is hoped this will afford Scotland’s largest town an opportunity to share news of its bid to become UK City of Culture 2021 with a global audience.  

The is also further evidence that Paisley is capable of hosting high profile music events – it hosted both the British Pipe Band Championships and the Scottish Album of the Year Awards this year, with both returning in 2017.  

It is also proof of Paisley’s burgeoning music scene. Renfrewshire’s talents have featured heavily in the BBC MG ALBA Scots Trad Awards in recent years with The Scott Wood Band nominated for ‘Folk Band of the Year’ in 2014 while Johnstone Pipe Band are in contention for ‘Pipe Band of the Year’ this year (see separate release for results).

Simon Thoumire said, “Hands Up for Trad are really delighted that the 2017 Scots Trad Music Awards will be hosted by Paisley, currently bidding for the UK City of Culture title in 2021, home of The Spree, and the birth place of some of Scotland’s finest musical talent. We’re really looking forward to working with Renfrewshire Council to make the Scots Trad Music Awards in 2017 the best yet“.

Welcoming the Trad Awards announcement, Renfrewshire Council leader, Mark Macmillan, said, “We are delighted to be hosting the Trad Awards in 2017 and look forward to welcoming fans from all over the world. Paisley’s music scene is thriving, offering formal concerts and more impromptu gigs in local cafes, bars and restaurants, as organisers grow in confidence. Add several major music events in 2017 and the reasons to visit have grown enormously.”                      

For more information on the Scots Trad Music Awards visit: https://projects.handsupfortrad.scot/scotstradmusicawards/

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This months events at THE BUNGLOW

Friday 2nd December:

What’s On: RadioLa & Fantanas
Genre: Soft Rock

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Saturday 3rd December:

What’s On:  Bootleg Beatnik & The Backscratchers + Andy Hamilton

Genre: Blues

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Sunday 4th December:

What’s On: Open Mic Night

Genre: Any

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Wednesday 7th December:

What’s On: The Ultimate Music Quiz

Genre: All Genres

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Thursday 8th December:

What’s On: Retro Games Night

Genre: Does PacMan Count?

Time: 6pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Friday 9th December:

What’s On: Gunz N’ Rozes Scotland + AWOL

Genre: Rock

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Entry: £3.00 (on the door)

Age: 18+

Saturday 10th December:

What’s On: Devil’s Queen, Tantrum & Civil Punk
Genre: Rock

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Sunday 11th December:

What’s On: Open Mic Night
Genre: Any

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: Free

Age 18+

Wednesday 14th December:

What’s On: The Ultimate Music Quiz

Genre: Any

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Thursday 15th December:

What’s On: Retro Games Night

Genre: We’re sure Kerplunk is available?

Time: 6pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Friday 16th December:

What’s On: All or Nothing with The Redstarts

Genre: Ska/Mod/Punk

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Entry: £3.00 on the door.

Age: 18+

Saturday 17th December:

What’s On: The Monitors Christmas Party

Genre: Punk/Rock

Time: 8pm
Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am
Entry: Free
Age: 18+

Sunday 18th December:
What’s On: Open Mic Night
Genre: Any

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Wednesday 21st December:

What’s On: The Ultimate Music Crimbo Quiz

Genre: Any

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Thursday 22nd December:

What’s On: Catholic Action, Sway & Pinact
Genre: Alternative

Time: 7pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 12am

Entry: £5.00
Age: 18+

Friday 23rd December:

What’s On: Messa O’Blues
Genre: Blues

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Saturday 24th December:

What’s On: The Xmas Eve Bash with Snakeskin Boogie

Genre: Funk/Bluegrass/Blues

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Sunday 25th December:

WE’RE CLOSED

Monday 26th December :

What’s On: Boxing Day Open Mic and Leftovers

Genre: Any

Time: 8pm
Opening Hours:  6pm – 1am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Wednesday 28th December:

What’s On: The Ultimate Music Quiz

Genre: Any

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 1am

Entry: Free

Age: 18+

Thursday 29th December:

What’s On: Xmas Jumper Jamboree with Delphi. Lemonhaze & The Asuras

Genre: Alternative/Indie

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 6pm – 1am

Entry: £3.00 on the door

Age: 18+

Friday 30th December:

What’s On: TBC

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Saturday 31st December:

What’s On: New Year’s Eve Party with Freespeech & Piper

Genre: Rock/Pop/Scottish

Time: 8pm

Opening Hours: 1pm – 1am

Entry: £5.00 Tickets & On the door

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This week in the Hoose

Upcoming events in the Hoose – see flyer for details.

this-week